Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsService Industry Layoffs
IN THE NEWS

Service Industry Layoffs

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 31, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To open her Mrs. Fields Cookies store in Costa Mesa's South Coast Plaza each morning, Janet Osinski, 21, flips on her computer even before she starts warming up the oven. Paging to a daily planner, she plugs in a few crucial facts: Rain is expected. Daylight savings time has just begun. Schools are on holiday. There's been an earthquake. And then she sits back.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1996 | GREG HERNANDEZ and CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the Angels played their final home game of the season Wednesday, many stadium employees wondered if they would ever work at the Big A again. Disney Sports Enterprises, which as part of its purchase of the California Angels in May will assume management of Anaheim Stadium on Tuesday, has interviewed but not promised jobs to the more than 700 part-time city employees who work as ushers, parking lot attendants and ticket sellers.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 28, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Sometimes today's economy is like an illness--before you even think about getting better, you want to know just what's wrong with you. Right now, even though experts insist that the economy is recovering from recession, the people don't believe it. Most people believe that there will be fewer jobs in the next year and that their income won't go up, according to the latest survey of consumer confidence by the Conference Board, a business research organization.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Phar-Mor Lays Off 310 More Employees: Phar-Mor Inc., the Youngstown, Ohio, discount drug store chain that has accused some of its top executives of a massive embezzlement scheme, said it will lay off 310 more workers. The company, which operates more than 300 stores, said 260 of the layoffs at its Tamco Distributors Co. inventory operation will be temporary, lasting about six weeks.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
Southland Corp. said Tuesday that it would eliminate 1,800 jobs during the next few months to cut costs and more efficiently operate its 7-Eleven convenience stores. The move affects 4% of the company's worldwide work force of 42,600, chiefly in local and district marketing groups and corporate offices. Southland took a $17.5-million charge in the second quarter to pay for the restructuring, contributing to a $17.9-million loss for the period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1996 | GREG HERNANDEZ and CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the Angels played their final home game of the season Wednesday, many stadium employees wondered if they would ever work at the Big A again. Disney Sports Enterprises, which as part of its purchase of the California Angels in May will assume management of Anaheim Stadium on Tuesday, has interviewed but not promised jobs to the more than 700 part-time city employees who work as ushers, parking lot attendants and ticket sellers.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Phar-Mor Lays Off 310 More Employees: Phar-Mor Inc., the Youngstown, Ohio, discount drug store chain that has accused some of its top executives of a massive embezzlement scheme, said it will lay off 310 more workers. The company, which operates more than 300 stores, said 260 of the layoffs at its Tamco Distributors Co. inventory operation will be temporary, lasting about six weeks.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to stem its mounting losses, R. H. Macy & Co. said Wednesday that it will close seven poorly performing Macy's department stores, most of them on the East Coast, and the Bullock's in La Habra. The closings, to be completed by Aug. 1, will result in the layoff or reassignment of 1,850 workers and change the face of some communities in which the stores are important retail assets.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- First-time jobless claims dropped to 346,000 last week, a positive sign ahead of Friday's government unemployment report for May. The Labor Department said Thursday the number of people filing for initial unemployment benefits in the week ending Saturday fell 11,000 from the previous week's upwardly revised figure of 357,000. The new snapshot on the labor market was in line with analyst expectations and indicated the labor market continues to grow at a moderate pace.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1992 | From Associated Press
Southland Corp. said Tuesday that it would eliminate 1,800 jobs during the next few months to cut costs and more efficiently operate its 7-Eleven convenience stores. The move affects 4% of the company's worldwide work force of 42,600, chiefly in local and district marketing groups and corporate offices. Southland took a $17.5-million charge in the second quarter to pay for the restructuring, contributing to a $17.9-million loss for the period.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To open her Mrs. Fields Cookies store in Costa Mesa's South Coast Plaza each morning, Janet Osinski, 21, flips on her computer even before she starts warming up the oven. Paging to a daily planner, she plugs in a few crucial facts: Rain is expected. Daylight savings time has just begun. Schools are on holiday. There's been an earthquake. And then she sits back.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to stem its mounting losses, R. H. Macy & Co. said Wednesday that it will close seven poorly performing Macy's department stores, most of them on the East Coast, and the Bullock's in La Habra. The closings, to be completed by Aug. 1, will result in the layoff or reassignment of 1,850 workers and change the face of some communities in which the stores are important retail assets.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Sometimes today's economy is like an illness--before you even think about getting better, you want to know just what's wrong with you. Right now, even though experts insist that the economy is recovering from recession, the people don't believe it. Most people believe that there will be fewer jobs in the next year and that their income won't go up, according to the latest survey of consumer confidence by the Conference Board, a business research organization.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|