Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsService Industry Wages And Salaries
IN THE NEWS

Service Industry Wages And Salaries

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1991
A union representing hundreds of maids, waiters, bellhops and other workers signed an agreement Monday with three Hyatt hotels in Los Angeles, ending a sometimes bitter 2 1/2-year dispute over wages and other benefits. Officials of Local 11 of the AFL-CIO's Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees Union said that employees voted 269 to 0 last week to ratify a three-year agreement with the Hyatt Regency, Hyatt on Sunset and Hyatt Wilshire hotels.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Santa Monica City Council has been forced to put a hotel-backed initiative on the November ballot that requires pay raises for some city workers, but forbids the council from enacting a citywide living wage law. To put the measure on the ballot, Santa Monicans for a Living Wage, a group organized by the city's luxury beach hotels, spent more than $400,000 to gather 9,815 signatures to qualify the measure.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
A state commission voted narrowly Friday to raise California's minimum wage to $4.25 an hour, the highest in the nation, in an action that drew loud cheers from laborers who took an all-night bus ride from Los Angeles to be here for the decision. The 27% increase, approved by a 3-2 vote of the Industrial Welfare Commission, will take effect July 1. The rise will make the state's minimum wage higher than the federal minimum, which has been $3.35 an hour since 1981.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Martha Crawford suspected that the Sears, Roebuck & Co. salesman checking the squeaky brakes on her 1985 Honda Accord cared more about his commission than her car. The estimate came to a staggering $422 for new front brakes; a Honda dealer later charged her $137 to fix the rear brakes and stop the squeaks. "It made me really angry," Crawford, an Orange resident, said of the April incident. "It seemed so greedy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1990
A proposed Community Redevelopment Agency policy that could lead to improved wages and health benefits for thousands of Los Angeles janitors, hotel maids and low-paid workers received support Thursday from Mayor Tom Bradley and three City Council members. Under the plan, employers whose businesses are built with the help of CRA funds would be required to pay workers substantially more than the near-minimum wage rates that prevail in the service sector.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1991
A hotel developer dropped from a major downtown Los Angeles redevelopment project filed a $70-million lawsuit against the city and county Wednesday, alleging the agencies illegally conspired to require union-style wages and worker protections in the project. The federal suit centers on a 350-room Ritz-Carlton Hotel that was to be built adjacent to the proposed Walt Disney Concert Hall complex near the Music Center. Gemtel Corp.
SPORTS
October 18, 1990 | JOHN CHERWA
The union that represents all pari-mutuel clerks in California and the organization that represents all of the race tracks have agreed in principle to sign a labor contract that has been unsigned for two years. Both Joe Stellino, president of Service Employees International Union Local 280, and Richard Hughes, director of industrial relations for the Federation of California Racing Assns., said the contract will be signed in the next few weeks.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The end of Las Vegas' most bitter labor dispute in years appears near at Binion's Horseshoe in downtown Las Vegas, where 600 workers have been on the picket lines for more than nine months. Employees will vote on a new three-year contract offer today. It was approved Monday night by the 30-member negotiating committee representing Culinary Local 226 and Bartenders Local 165. The new proposal was presented to the union Sunday night after negotiations between top union and management officials.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1992 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Every now and then, local governments try to do something innovative to help those low-income workers who take unenviable private sector jobs to earn enough money to keep them off welfare. In the wide and growing world of poverty in America, those rare acts of local government decency can only help a relatively few people; but they could, in theory, be expanded substantially.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1992 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Every now and then, local governments try to do something innovative to help those low-income workers who take unenviable private sector jobs to earn enough money to keep them off welfare. In the wide and growing world of poverty in America, those rare acts of local government decency can only help a relatively few people; but they could, in theory, be expanded substantially.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1991
A union representing hundreds of maids, waiters, bellhops and other workers signed an agreement Monday with three Hyatt hotels in Los Angeles, ending a sometimes bitter 2 1/2-year dispute over wages and other benefits. Officials of Local 11 of the AFL-CIO's Hotel Employees & Restaurant Employees Union said that employees voted 269 to 0 last week to ratify a three-year agreement with the Hyatt Regency, Hyatt on Sunset and Hyatt Wilshire hotels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1991
A hotel developer dropped from a major downtown Los Angeles redevelopment project filed a $70-million lawsuit against the city and county Wednesday, alleging the agencies illegally conspired to require union-style wages and worker protections in the project. The federal suit centers on a 350-room Ritz-Carlton Hotel that was to be built adjacent to the proposed Walt Disney Concert Hall complex near the Music Center. Gemtel Corp.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The end of Las Vegas' most bitter labor dispute in years appears near at Binion's Horseshoe in downtown Las Vegas, where 600 workers have been on the picket lines for more than nine months. Employees will vote on a new three-year contract offer today. It was approved Monday night by the 30-member negotiating committee representing Culinary Local 226 and Bartenders Local 165. The new proposal was presented to the union Sunday night after negotiations between top union and management officials.
SPORTS
October 18, 1990 | JOHN CHERWA
The union that represents all pari-mutuel clerks in California and the organization that represents all of the race tracks have agreed in principle to sign a labor contract that has been unsigned for two years. Both Joe Stellino, president of Service Employees International Union Local 280, and Richard Hughes, director of industrial relations for the Federation of California Racing Assns., said the contract will be signed in the next few weeks.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Martha Crawford suspected that the Sears, Roebuck & Co. salesman checking the squeaky brakes on her 1985 Honda Accord cared more about his commission than her car. The estimate came to a staggering $422 for new front brakes; a Honda dealer later charged her $137 to fix the rear brakes and stop the squeaks. "It made me really angry," Crawford, an Orange resident, said of the April incident. "It seemed so greedy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Santa Monica City Council has been forced to put a hotel-backed initiative on the November ballot that requires pay raises for some city workers, but forbids the council from enacting a citywide living wage law. To put the measure on the ballot, Santa Monicans for a Living Wage, a group organized by the city's luxury beach hotels, spent more than $400,000 to gather 9,815 signatures to qualify the measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1990
A proposed Community Redevelopment Agency policy that could lead to improved wages and health benefits for thousands of Los Angeles janitors, hotel maids and low-paid workers received support Thursday from Mayor Tom Bradley and three City Council members. Under the plan, employers whose businesses are built with the help of CRA funds would be required to pay workers substantially more than the near-minimum wage rates that prevail in the service sector.
NEWS
December 19, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
A state commission voted narrowly Friday to raise California's minimum wage to $4.25 an hour, the highest in the nation, in an action that drew loud cheers from laborers who took an all-night bus ride from Los Angeles to be here for the decision. The 27% increase, approved by a 3-2 vote of the Industrial Welfare Commission, will take effect July 1. The rise will make the state's minimum wage higher than the federal minimum, which has been $3.35 an hour since 1981.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|