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NEWS
December 6, 1992 | MICHELE FUETSCH and KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of Marines, Air Force pilots and Navy engineers around Southern California are packing their bags, paying their bills and rushing out to buy Christmas gifts because they soon will be helping deliver food and other lifesaving supplies to starving people in Somalia. For many of the service personnel and their families, it is the second time in two years that they have had to prepare for a lonely holiday season.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2013 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
They were the swinging, sassy voice of the homefront for U.S. service personnel overseas during World War II, singing catchy hit tunes such as "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" and "Rum and Coca Cola" that delighted Americans and catapulted the Andrews Sisters to the very top of the pop charts. One of the most successful female recording groups in pop history, the sisters - LaVerne, Maxene and Patty Andrews - became a beloved American institution, lifting the nation's spirits during a conflict whose outcome seemed often in doubt.
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NEWS
March 9, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 6,300 American troops flew home Friday toward a joyous, grateful nation giddily preparing to embrace them with open arms. Among the returning men and women were hundreds of sun-baked Marines from Camp Pendleton and Twentynine Palms. "California here I come," one Marine exulted. "We're the ones who took Kuwait International Airport," another shouted from the back of a 2 1/2-ton truck as it lurched to a stop just outside the passenger terminal at the Jubayl Naval Airport here.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, The Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
In a finding suggesting powerful psychiatric benefits for a component of fish oil, a study published Wednesday has linked military suicides to low levels of docosahexaenoic acid and found that service personnel with higher levels of DHA in their blood were less likely to take their own lives. The study, published this week in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, looked back at the medical records of 800 U.S. servicemen and women who took their own lives between 2002 and 2008, and compared them with the records of 800 service personnel -- matched for age, gender and rank -- who had no history of suicide attempts.  Men whose records showed they had low levels of DHA in their blood were 62% more likely to have been suicide victims than those with the highest levels.
NEWS
April 22, 1990 | ROBERT BURNS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bob Thorlakson looked back at 22 years in the Army and ahead to the shrinking military of the post-Cold War '90s and made a decision. "I got out. I decided not to wait around for the cuts to hit," he said. Thorlakson and untold numbers of other men and women in the American armed forces are trying to make their peace with peace. Some are leaving. Many more are considering it.
NEWS
January 22, 1991
KILLED IN ACTION: 1 1 American killed in action SERVICE PERSONNEL MISSING IN ACTION: 21 12 Americans 6 Britons 2 Italians 1 Kuwaiti PLANES LOST IN COMBAT: 16 9 American 4 British 1 Kuwait 1 Italian 1 Saudi
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Civilians who don the uniform and march into war carrying the psychological burden of previous trauma -- or of afflictions such as depression or anxiety disorder --  are far more likely than their mentally healthy comrades to suffer battle-related stress following deployment, new research has found. A study published this week in the Archives of General Psychiatry also found that women, African Americans and those with less education were slightly more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder ( PTSD )
NEWS
April 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The Senate voted to confirm Douglas "Pete" Peterson as the first postwar U.S. ambassador to Vietnam. Peterson, a former Democratic congressman from Florida, served as a fighter pilot in Vietnam and was held prisoner by Hanoi for more than six years. Peterson was nominated by President Clinton in May, and his confirmation was delayed amid a debate over Vietnam's efforts to account for missing U.S. service personnel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1999 | NORINE DRESSER, Norine Dresser's latest book is "Multicultural Celebrations" (Three Rivers Press, 1999). E-mail: norined@earthlink.net
Before entering the home of his next customer, Mike, the Southern California Gas Co. serviceman, covers his shoes with surgical booties. What does it mean? OSHA regulations require service personnel to wear leather boots with metal toe-covers while they work.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, The Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
In a finding suggesting powerful psychiatric benefits for a component of fish oil, a study published Wednesday has linked military suicides to low levels of docosahexaenoic acid and found that service personnel with higher levels of DHA in their blood were less likely to take their own lives. The study, published this week in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, looked back at the medical records of 800 U.S. servicemen and women who took their own lives between 2002 and 2008, and compared them with the records of 800 service personnel -- matched for age, gender and rank -- who had no history of suicide attempts.  Men whose records showed they had low levels of DHA in their blood were 62% more likely to have been suicide victims than those with the highest levels.
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Civilians who don the uniform and march into war carrying the psychological burden of previous trauma -- or of afflictions such as depression or anxiety disorder --  are far more likely than their mentally healthy comrades to suffer battle-related stress following deployment, new research has found. A study published this week in the Archives of General Psychiatry also found that women, African Americans and those with less education were slightly more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder ( PTSD )
WORLD
August 30, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Before Marine Cpl. Corey Griggs went on his last patrol in Afghanistan's restive Helmand province, he had a premonition of sorts. "I was joking with my buddies that it was going to be a bad night," said Griggs, 23, of Portland, Ore. He was right. As darkness settled on a recent Saturday over the desert village of Sangin, someone threw a bomb over a mud wall at Griggs and his squad. The blast shattered his right forearm and embedded jagged shrapnel in his left. After emergency surgery at a military outpost, Griggs, who is also being monitored for possible brain injuries, was placed aboard a specially outfitted cargo plane airlifting him to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center next to the U.S. air base at Ramstein, Germany.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2005 | Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writer
There's a diner called Peggy Sue's about eight miles outside of Barstow, and as hard as Lt. Col. Kenneth Parks tries, he can never seem to pay his bill. He orders a burger and a chocolate shake. But before he's finished, the waitress informs him the tab has been taken care of by yet another stranger who prefers to remain anonymous but who wants to do something for a soldier in uniform. Many Americans have conflicted feelings about the Iraq war, but not about the warriors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2004 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
In its strongest language yet, the Defense Department reiterated that it had no plans to reopen the commissary at the closed El Toro Marine base. But three members of Orange County's congressional delegation say they won't give up their protracted battle to reopen the facility, which offered food and other merchandise at discounted prices to active and retired military personnel. In a Jan. 22 letter, Deputy Undersecretary John M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2003 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Marine Sgt. Jovany Rolon sat in the front row of a Montebello country club ballroom Thursday in his dress uniform, fidgeting with his little plastic American flag. Minutes later, the Guadalajara-born 22-year-old took an oath and became a citizen of the country he served during recent military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. "If I would've stayed in Mexico, I wouldn't be who I am today, so I wanted to give something back," Rolon said. "I'm nervous....
BUSINESS
May 26, 2003 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
What's next for returning military personnel after they kiss their loved ones hello? Thousands will be looking for work in one of the toughest job markets in years. Karin Markley of Chatsworth saw an opportunity. A year ago, she started Military Exits, a Web-based placement agency for those leaving the armed services -- or "transitioning out," in military jargon.
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | Associated Press
The U.S. Navy will begin pulling out from its largest base in Asia by mid-May and will turn over the garrison to the Philippines by the end of the year, it was reported Sunday. The Stars and Stripes, the unofficial newspaper of the U.S. military, said the timetable was contained in a 13-page schedule of withdrawal distributed to commanders at Subic Bay Naval Base, 50 miles west of Manila. According to the newspaper, the Navy will start moving out of the main part of the base by mid-May. By Sept.
NEWS
August 11, 1986 | EDITH H. FINE and JUDITH P. JOSEPHSON
A Marine strapped all his gear onto his motorcycle and barreled west from his Kansas home to report for duty. Arriving at Camp Pendleton five days later, the exhausted young man was denied entry to the base because his bike failed to pass muster. Alone, with nowhere to stash his gear, the Marine felt stymied. Then he remembered the Chalet. A chalet? In Oceanside, Calif.? Forget the snow-covered mountains.
NEWS
April 30, 2003 | Esther Schrader, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon has moved its Middle East air operations control center from Saudi Arabia to neighboring Qatar, and nearly all of the 4,500 service members and 100 planes at Prince Sultan Air Base will leave by August, U.S. military officials said Tuesday. The decision to mothball the center in Saudi Arabia -- part of the U.S. presence there that has drawn the wrath of terrorists -- was made by "mutual agreement" with the Saudi government, Defense Secretary Donald H.
NEWS
February 16, 2003
Re "Some Oppose War, Some Oppose Protest," Feb. 2: I was deeply troubled by a letter from Mary Monk of San Clemente. I am a Vietnam veteran who feels his service was at least in part about defending our individual rights (including our freedom of speech). I was troubled because I felt it was an attempt by Ms. Monk to silence my desire to protest this war; at the same time I don't want a repeat of war protesters who blamed the soldiers for the war. I was called "baby killer" when I wore my uniform in public during my service in 1969 and 1970 (something I was required to do when traveling)
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