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Service Tax

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NEWS
April 18, 1991 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The $30 hourly fee for accordion lessons at Dave's Accordion School in the Atwater Village would probably go up. So would the cost of having a tent zipper replaced at Leslie's Outdoor Gear Repair in Costa Mesa if the state begins taxing not just the new zipper, but the labor required to sew it in. "It means that every time I sew up a little hole, I'd have to pass it along to my customers," said proprietor Leslie Pemberton. "It would get really confusing."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County supervisors unanimously approved a tax increase Tuesday that would give their Fire Department an extra $1.5 million in annual revenue. The 2% increase will raise the fire protection district taxes for a single-family home by about $1 to $62.26 each year. The special service tax is an essential funding component for the department, according to a letter fire officials sent to the board. The department has a $940-million total budget and serves about 4 million residents in the unincorporated parts of the county and various contract cities.
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NEWS
December 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Gov. Bob Martinez signed a bill Friday repealing an unpopular state tax on many professional services and enacting a $1.2-billion increase in the sales tax on goods. The action ended months of bickering between Martinez, a first-term Republican, and the Democratic-controlled Legislature, which was splintered by three special sessions needed to repeal the 5% services tax. Several hours after the signing, Standard & Poor's Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2010 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Kimi Yoshino and Ruben Vives, Los Angeles Times
The city of Bell nearly doubled taxes for sewer, trash and other public services without voter approval — then illegally funneled more than $1 million of the proceeds to then-City Administrator Robert Rizzo and his assistant, a state audit released Wednesday shows. The long-awaited audit provides the clearest link to date between two of the leading elements of the scandal in Bell — the city's illegal tax increases and the outsized pay and benefits provided to its former leaders, eight of whom were arrested Tuesday on charges of public corruption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1996 | KELLY DAVID
In order to keep their streets clean, their landscape green and their street lights lit, Oak Park residents may have to pay an additional $20 at tax time next year to cover a budget shortfall. The Oak Park Municipal Advisory Council unanimously supported a service tax, equal to about $20 per household, at its meeting Tuesday night. But it is not expected to come before the Ventura County Board of Supervisors for final approval until this summer.
OPINION
May 6, 2008
When Democrats propose broadening sales taxes to cover services, and Republicans such as Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and business groups like the California Chamber of Commerce say no, taxpayers on either side of the issue know they can at least rely on the natural order of things. But when the governor's staff mulls a new service tax, and business groups back it, some kind of cosmic shift is afoot. Californians should embrace it -- warily.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2012 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County supervisors unanimously approved a tax increase Tuesday that would give their Fire Department an extra $1.5 million in annual revenue. The 2% increase will raise the fire protection district taxes for a single-family home by about $1 to $62.26 each year. The special service tax is an essential funding component for the department, according to a letter fire officials sent to the board. The department has a $940-million total budget and serves about 4 million residents in the unincorporated parts of the county and various contract cities.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | HELAINE OLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The states, desperate to ease their mounting fiscal crises, are once again eyeing a seemingly boundless source of additional revenues--imposing taxes not just on the sale of goods but also of services, which now are exempt from most state sales taxes. And, despite powerful opposition, the move toward taxing services may become an unavoidable trend for a more basic reason: It permits state tax systems to adapt to the fundamental shift in the U.S. economy from manufacturing to services.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
If your phone bill seems to be getting tougher to figure out, you're not alone. Even experts confess they have difficulty decoding phone bills that in recent years have added fees, taxes and explanations of the new charges that more often than not add to the confusion. Telephone regulators--led by Federal Communications Commission Chairman William E. Kennard, who says he has trouble understanding his own bill--are expected this month to issue proposals aimed at making phone bills less confusing.
OPINION
January 16, 2008
Re "Pain of budget plan is widely spread," Jan. 12 Where did Americans get the idea that the words "bad" and "taxes" always belong in the same sentence? We want schools, parks, highways, police, fire protection and a host of other things that make life more civilized. These cost money. That is why we pay taxes. I am not rich. I don't want my tax money wasted. But I expect to pay to be safe, to have my children well-educated, to drive on good roads, to play in beautiful, well-maintained parks and to have all the other things that ensure a good life.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2009 | MICHAEL HILTZIK
The Schwarzenegger administration, which was launched via an electoral campaign of majestic hypocrisy in 2003, has finally fulfilled all the heady promise of those distant days of the Gray Davis recall. Just a few days after being featured on "60 Minutes" talking about his commitment to "what is best for the people of California," he sneaked his sixth annual budget plan into the public spotlight on New Year's Eve.
OPINION
May 6, 2008
When Democrats propose broadening sales taxes to cover services, and Republicans such as Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and business groups like the California Chamber of Commerce say no, taxpayers on either side of the issue know they can at least rely on the natural order of things. But when the governor's staff mulls a new service tax, and business groups back it, some kind of cosmic shift is afoot. Californians should embrace it -- warily.
OPINION
January 16, 2008
Re "Pain of budget plan is widely spread," Jan. 12 Where did Americans get the idea that the words "bad" and "taxes" always belong in the same sentence? We want schools, parks, highways, police, fire protection and a host of other things that make life more civilized. These cost money. That is why we pay taxes. I am not rich. I don't want my tax money wasted. But I expect to pay to be safe, to have my children well-educated, to drive on good roads, to play in beautiful, well-maintained parks and to have all the other things that ensure a good life.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2005 | From Associated Press
One month after pledging to staunch the loss of customers from its digital tax business, H&R Block Inc. said Thursday that it had acquired a small, online tax service company whose founders helped create the popular Turbo Tax software. TaxNet Inc. of San Diego, formed last year by Tom Allanson and David Murray, launched its online tax preparation and filing program in January. Formerly with Intuit Inc.'
BUSINESS
January 23, 2004 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
The IRS kicked off the second year of a free online income tax filing service Thursday, saying the kinks that brought so many complaints last year had been worked out. Then the system crashed. "The start of every filing season is like the release of new software," said Terry Lutes, deputy associate chief of information technology services for the IRS. "There are always a few bugs, but once the bugs are worked out, it hums for the rest of the year."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2003 | Mitchell Landsberg and Evan Halper, Times Staff Writers
Gov. Gray Davis proposed a $96.4-billion state budget Friday that offers pain for almost every Californian, from tax hikes for the rich to reductions in medical care for the poor and elderly, and pointedly sidesteps the long-term "structural reform" that Davis has said is necessary. The budget also shifts $8 billion in programs, along with the revenue to fund them, to county governments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1995 | CARLOS V. LOZANO
Ventura County residents who live in the unincorporated areas around Ventura and Ojai will be allowed to decide whether they want to tax themselves to help pay for library services, county supervisors agreed Tuesday. The board decided to place a measure on the ballot in November that would levy a $35 parcel tax on every property owner in the area. The election would coincide with similar elections in the cities of Ventura and Ojai.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | Associated Press
Frustrated after nearly a month of haggling with Gov. Bob Martinez, legislative leaders abruptly adjourned a second special session Wednesday without acting on the state's controversial services tax. The decision by lawmakers to leave the landmark $760-million tax on the books, at least for the time being, stifled Martinez's efforts to shed a law that has brought him heavy voter disapproval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2001 | EVELYN LARRUBIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a year where California counties already are struggling from increased energy costs and a softening economy, bioterrorism preparedness could drain an additional $80 million from the coffers of those governments, which supply most of the social services used by poor people and others.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1999 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
H&R Block Inc. says it is looking to sell its Irvine-based wholesale mortgage unit, Option One, in an effort to focus on its retail businesses. Founded in 1992, Option One specializes in mortgages to customers with bad credit, originating about $3.6 billion in loans over the last year. That makes the company--which employs 1,500 people nationwide, including 600 in Orange County--slightly larger than Orange-based rival Long Beach Financial Corp.
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