Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsServicers
IN THE NEWS

Servicers

BUSINESS
February 17, 2011 | By Ronald D. Orol
Major U.S. banks are about to get penalized for "critical deficiencies" and shortcomings in how they handled foreclosures, a top federal regulator said Thursday at a Senate Banking Committee hearing examining the Dodd-Frank Act six months after its congressional approval. "These deficiencies have resulted in violations of state and local foreclosure laws, regulations or rules," said John Walsh, acting comptroller of the currency. Banking regulators are preparing sanctions and "remedial requirements," he said.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 6, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Up to 3 million homeowners could save about $1,000 a year because of a reduction in fees, announced Tuesday by President Obama ,  on refinancing their government-backed mortgages. In addition, the White House said it was taking new steps to help military members whose homes were improperly foreclosed by large mortgage servicers. Among the steps, the servicers have agreed to conduct a review overseen by the Justice Department of all foreclosures of military members since 2006 to determine if they violated a federal ban on such actions for active duty service members.  Any violations will result in the servicer paying the military member's lost equity, plus interest, plus $116,785.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley will begin sending $247 million in payments on Friday to nearly a quarter-million people under a settlement of foreclosure-abuse allegations with regulators, the Federal Reserve said. The two Wall Street giants are the last of 13 mortgage servicers to begin making the payments to borrowers whose homes were in foreclosure proceedings in 2009 and 2010. The servicers, which also included Bank of America Corp. , Wells Fargo & Co. and JPMorgan Chase & Co., agreed to pay $3.6 billion to more than 4.2 million borrowers in a settlement reached in January.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
As part of a settlement with federal regulators, 13 lenders this week are to begin paying $3.6 billion to more than 4 million troubled borrowers whose homes were in foreclosure proceedings in 2009 and 2010. A chart released Tuesday by the regulators showed most of the borrowers would receive $300, the minimum allowed under the settlement terms. The maximum of $125,000 was to be paid to 1,135 borrowers whose homes were seized while they were serving in the military or were current on their payments.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2012 | By Lew Sichelman
Deadlines are looming for anyone seeking a review of their foreclosure proceeding and for homeowners considering a short sale. Few taking advantage of foreclosure review Under the terms of an enforcement action between Uncle Sam and large mortgage servicers, you still have time to ask someone to ensure that you were treated fairly if you were involved in a foreclosure. In February, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Reserve Board extended the deadline for the "independent foreclosure review" to July 31 from April 30. Now the deadline has been extended again, to Sept.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Violations of a landmark mortgage settlement alleged by New York's attorney general are also widespread in California, a housing advocacy group says. “Banks aren't doing what they're supposed to be doing to help people stay in their homes,” said Kevin Stein, associate director of the California Reinvestment Coalition, a San Francisco-based group that lobbies for low-income Californians.  New York Atty. Gen. Eric Schneiderman announced Monday he planned to sue Wells Fargo and Bank of America for "flagrantly" violating terms of last year's $25 billion National Mortgage Settlement.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2009 | E. Scott Reckard
A report from federal regulators contains bits of encouragement for struggling homeowners seeking to have their mortgages modified. In the second quarter, 78% of loan modifications involved actually reducing borrowers' payments, up from 54% in the first quarter, the report says. The shift came as mortgage servicers became less likely to merely add missed payments to the balance of a reworked loan. The joint report from the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, which regulates national banks, and the Office of Thrift Supervision, the federal overseer for savings and loans, surveyed servicers of 64% of all U.S. home loans.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
Banks aren't living up to pledges they made as part of a $26-billion settlement of government investigations into mortgage servicing and foreclosure abuses, according to an advocacy group's survey of California housing counselors and lawyers. The survey, the ninth in a series conducted by the California Reinvestment Coalition, also found that providers of mortgage customer service are violating consumer-protection provisions in the California Homeowner Bill of Rights, the package of foreclosure-prevention laws sponsored last year by state Atty.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By Lew Sichelman
Financially strapped homeowners who are close to foreclosure may want to face the music now rather than continuing to struggle with their monthly payments. There's a high probability of losing the house anyway, even with the government's help. According to a new report, people who take advantage of a key federal program to modify their mortgages in an effort to save their homes are defaulting "at an alarming rate. " The report from the special inspector general for the Treasury Department's Troubled Asset Relief Program doesn't say why an inordinately high percentage of owners who take part in the Home Affordable Modification Program, or HAMP, are unable to maintain their loan modifications.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2009 | By Lew Sichelman
For most of the growing legion of financially stretched families in danger of losing their homes, there is help available -- as long as they don't bury their heads in the sand. According to industry estimates, half of all owners who lose their homes to foreclosure have no contact with the "servicers" that mail out the statements and collect payments. That's a mind-numbing statistic given the government's efforts to keep people in their homes. "Never in history have more resources been devoted" to solving the foreclosure crisis, says Faith Schwartz, executive director of the HOPE Now Alliance, a collaboration of housing counselors and mortgage-industry participants created to reach out to owners who cannot pay their mortgages.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|