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NATIONAL
June 1, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania said he did not seek and was not given any assurance that he would not face a primary challenge when he decided to leave the Republican Party to join the Democrats. "I didn't ask that the field be cleared. There was no discussion of that," Specter said on "Fox News Sunday," when asked about a possible Democratic primary challenge by Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.). "Everybody ought to run if he or she wants to run. And I'm ready to take on all comers." Sestak has said he is seriously considering taking on the incumbent.
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NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Former Congressman Pat Toomey has defeated Democrat Rep. Joe Sestak in Pennsylvania's Senate race, reclaiming the seat for Republicans 19 months after incumbent Arlen Specter abandoned the party. Toomey nearly unseated Specter in a 2004 primary and looked to challenge the five-term incumbent again this year. Faced with a rematch that looked more difficult, and after a lobbying campaign led by Vice President Joe Biden, Specter decided in late April 2009 to seek reelection as a Democrat.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
As Democrats seek to focus voter attention on the nation's economic problems that existed before President Obama took over, they have begun wielding a sharp new tool: the Wall Street reform law and Republican opposition to it. Large GOP gains in Congress could allow Republicans to hinder, or in some cases block, the ability of regulators to implement the law's stricter oversight of the financial industry. With the stakes so high, Democrats are highlighting any Republican ties to Wall Street — no matter how dated or tangential.
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Locked in a close race for the seat representing Pennsylvania in the U.S. Senate, Republican Pat Toomey on Sunday insisted that he is no Christine O’Donnell. O’Donnell, the GOP senatorial candidate in neighboring Delaware, is a “tea party” movement favorite, whose conservative positions allowed her to defeat an establishment Republican for the senatorial nomination. Her campaign in the general election has been become bogged down in a variety of issues, including her campaign ad explaining that she is not really a witch.
OPINION
October 24, 2010 | Doyle McManus
If you're looking for a bellwether race that might tell you early on election night how the congressional elections will turn out nationwide, look to Pennsylvania. The Senate race here is as pure a version of the national debate as you're likely to find, and it's in a state that often reflects the mood of the country as a whole. According to recent polls, the race is a dead heat. The Democratic candidate is Rep. Joe Sestak, a retired Navy admiral who says he's proud of his votes for President Obama's economic stimulus and healthcare bills ?
NATIONAL
September 15, 2009 | Peter Nicholas and Josh Drobnyk
President Obama wades into an intramural fight among Democrats today by attending a high-dollar fundraising dinner for Sen. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.), demonstrating an unusual measure of personal commitment in a primary battle whose outcome is far from clear. As leader of his party, Obama had the option of following a more neutral course and staying out of the primary race between Specter and Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.). But the White House has opted to double down on its support for Specter, a longtime Republican who switched parties in the spring partly to avoid an anticipated defeat in the GOP primary next year.
OPINION
May 27, 2010
It's no secret that the Obama administration wanted Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.) to drop his primary challenge to Republican-turned-Democrat Sen. Arlen Specter. But did President Obama's representatives try to entice Sestak into leaving the race by promising him a job? It's a simple question, and one that Sestak already has answered in the affirmative, but the administration continues to treat the issue as much ado about nothing. Actually, it's much ado about something. Yes, political factors often influence appointments in unsavory ways — witness the practice of awarding ambassadorships to campaign contributors.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2009 | By Joshua Drobnyk
Rep. Joe Sestak needs a comb. His wavy, graying hair has been through a hectic morning, and the Pennsylvania Democrat is racing toward his third interview of the day, this time with ABC News. "Nobody under 40 carries a comb," he says. "See, watch this." Sestak, 57, looks at one of the young aides rushing ahead of him up an escalator in the Capitol Visitor Center: "Do you have a comb?" The staffer answers nervously: "No, sir." Primped or not, Sestak's life as a Senate candidate is a constant scramble to get his face on the air or his words in print, a frantic push to paint a portrait of himself for state voters -- and anyone else with the time to listen -- as he fights to get noticed.
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Locked in a close race for the seat representing Pennsylvania in the U.S. Senate, Republican Pat Toomey on Sunday insisted that he is no Christine O’Donnell. O’Donnell, the GOP senatorial candidate in neighboring Delaware, is a “tea party” movement favorite, whose conservative positions allowed her to defeat an establishment Republican for the senatorial nomination. Her campaign in the general election has been become bogged down in a variety of issues, including her campaign ad explaining that she is not really a witch.
NEWS
September 20, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to discussing the man who is running to replace him, Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter would prefer the aptly named game of squash. Specter, 80, was among those who greeted President Obama on Monday when the president arrived in Philadelphia to campaign for Joe Sestak, who defeated Specter in the Democratic primary. The White House had strongly backed Specter, who converted to the Democratic Party last year, helping it to control the Senate where he had served as a top Republican since 1980.
OPINION
October 24, 2010 | Doyle McManus
If you're looking for a bellwether race that might tell you early on election night how the congressional elections will turn out nationwide, look to Pennsylvania. The Senate race here is as pure a version of the national debate as you're likely to find, and it's in a state that often reflects the mood of the country as a whole. According to recent polls, the race is a dead heat. The Democratic candidate is Rep. Joe Sestak, a retired Navy admiral who says he's proud of his votes for President Obama's economic stimulus and healthcare bills ?
NEWS
September 20, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to discussing the man who is running to replace him, Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter would prefer the aptly named game of squash. Specter, 80, was among those who greeted President Obama on Monday when the president arrived in Philadelphia to campaign for Joe Sestak, who defeated Specter in the Democratic primary. The White House had strongly backed Specter, who converted to the Democratic Party last year, helping it to control the Senate where he had served as a top Republican since 1980.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
As Democrats seek to focus voter attention on the nation's economic problems that existed before President Obama took over, they have begun wielding a sharp new tool: the Wall Street reform law and Republican opposition to it. Large GOP gains in Congress could allow Republicans to hinder, or in some cases block, the ability of regulators to implement the law's stricter oversight of the financial industry. With the stakes so high, Democrats are highlighting any Republican ties to Wall Street — no matter how dated or tangential.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Obama White House enlisted former President Clinton to push a Democratic candidate out of a primary campaign by offering an appointment to a prestigious federal board as an inducement, according to an internal White House investigation whose findings were released Friday. White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, a top aide to Clinton in the 1990s, used the former president as a go-between in the unsuccessful attempt to clear the field for Sen. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.), the report showed.
OPINION
May 27, 2010
It's no secret that the Obama administration wanted Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.) to drop his primary challenge to Republican-turned-Democrat Sen. Arlen Specter. But did President Obama's representatives try to entice Sestak into leaving the race by promising him a job? It's a simple question, and one that Sestak already has answered in the affirmative, but the administration continues to treat the issue as much ado about nothing. Actually, it's much ado about something. Yes, political factors often influence appointments in unsavory ways — witness the practice of awarding ambassadorships to campaign contributors.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2009 | By Joshua Drobnyk
Rep. Joe Sestak needs a comb. His wavy, graying hair has been through a hectic morning, and the Pennsylvania Democrat is racing toward his third interview of the day, this time with ABC News. "Nobody under 40 carries a comb," he says. "See, watch this." Sestak, 57, looks at one of the young aides rushing ahead of him up an escalator in the Capitol Visitor Center: "Do you have a comb?" The staffer answers nervously: "No, sir." Primped or not, Sestak's life as a Senate candidate is a constant scramble to get his face on the air or his words in print, a frantic push to paint a portrait of himself for state voters -- and anyone else with the time to listen -- as he fights to get noticed.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Former Congressman Pat Toomey has defeated Democrat Rep. Joe Sestak in Pennsylvania's Senate race, reclaiming the seat for Republicans 19 months after incumbent Arlen Specter abandoned the party. Toomey nearly unseated Specter in a 2004 primary and looked to challenge the five-term incumbent again this year. Faced with a rematch that looked more difficult, and after a lobbying campaign led by Vice President Joe Biden, Specter decided in late April 2009 to seek reelection as a Democrat.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Obama White House enlisted former President Clinton to push a Democratic candidate out of a primary campaign by offering an appointment to a prestigious federal board as an inducement, according to an internal White House investigation whose findings were released Friday. White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, a top aide to Clinton in the 1990s, used the former president as a go-between in the unsuccessful attempt to clear the field for Sen. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.), the report showed.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2009 | Peter Nicholas and Josh Drobnyk
President Obama wades into an intramural fight among Democrats today by attending a high-dollar fundraising dinner for Sen. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.), demonstrating an unusual measure of personal commitment in a primary battle whose outcome is far from clear. As leader of his party, Obama had the option of following a more neutral course and staying out of the primary race between Specter and Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.). But the White House has opted to double down on its support for Specter, a longtime Republican who switched parties in the spring partly to avoid an anticipated defeat in the GOP primary next year.
OPINION
August 6, 2009
Arlen Specter, the five-term senator from Pennsylvania and recently minted Democrat, is one of the great survivors of U.S. politics, and he may extend his lease on public office next year when he seeks reelection. But he shouldn't expect to win the nomination of his new party by default. Thanks to Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.), he won't. Sestak, a retired vice admiral, announced Tuesday that he will challenge Specter in the 2010 Democratic primary.
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