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NEWS
June 21, 1990 | LEON WHITESON, Whiteson is a Los Angeles architect and author whose most recent book is "The Watts Towers of Los Angeles."
In Ayn Rand's 1940s bestseller "The Fountainhead," architect Howard Roark blows up a housing complex he designed because the developer changed its style. It was a dramatic act and a dramatic role for an architect. And when the book became a movie starring Gary Cooper, producers asked the dynamic real-life model for Roark--Frank Lloyd Wright--to design the movie sets.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | Marisa Gerber
Stephenie McMillan, the prolific British set designer whose meticulous eye brought the whimsical world of Harry Potter to life and earned her an Academy Award for "The English Patient," has died. She was 71. McMillan, who almost always collaborated with production designer Stuart Craig, with whom she shared the Oscar for best art direction/set decoration, died Monday from complications of ovarian cancer at her home in Norfolk, England, said her partner, Phil Hardy. An eye for even the smallest details -- and an understanding of how they swayed the story line -- set her body of work apart, said Thomas Walsh, former president of the Art Directors Guild.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
If recent pop culture can be succinctly described, it might be called the Age of the Designer. It started with designer jeans, and now it's extended all the way to designer hand vacuums. The demand for designed goods, cars and living spaces are all telling signs of an ever-growing interest in how things look, and diminished interest in what's inside the package. We have all heard the dangers of form over substance in many areas of society, and it's also discussed in the theater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc, Los Angeles Times
Jim Mees, an Emmy-winning set decorator who helped bring alien worlds to life in the long-running "Star Trek" TV series, died Friday at his home in Selinsgrove, Pa., said his partner, Michael Smyth. He was 57 and had pancreatic cancer. Mees, who worked on more than a dozen TV shows in his 30-year career, spent a total of 14 years on "Star Trek" sets, spanning from "The Next Generation" to "Star Trek: Enterprise. " He was known for the futuristic sets he conjured, often from scratch, with elaborate schemes and basic challenges such as a director's edict against showing wheels on props.
HOME & GARDEN
December 27, 2007 | Christy Hobart, Special to The Times
CHANCES are you've seen the grand entry before. And the immense hallway. You've probably seen the kitchen, the dining room and a bedroom or two. Greystone Mansion, the house designed by Gordon Kaufman and completed in 1928 as a gift from oil tycoon Edward Doheny to his son, is a versatile estate that film crews descend upon often for its opulent beauty, acres of manicured grounds and Beverly Hills location.
MAGAZINE
February 9, 2003 | Barbara Thornburg
Where do L.A.'s film and TV set designers find that perfect chair, offbeat lighting or unusual linoleum rug? Allow us to introduce L.A.'s star design talents in furniture, textiles, surfaces, lighting and accessories. Working out of small studios, home kitchens or garages, from Carpinteria to Venice to Inglewood, these boutique manufacturers have often toiled in anonymity. Until now. Which means even you can go out and buy an on-screen original.
HOME & GARDEN
October 24, 1992 | KATHY BRYANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To some degree, what we know about history and what we think might happen in the future has been brought to us--in Technicolor--by the movies. Whether they're accurate or not is beside the point; they are glimpses into worlds we could otherwise never hope to visit. Interior design has been touched by Hollywood since the early Talkies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2005 | Gary Dymski, Newsday
What type of interior designer writes a book about television? Someone who once believed those weren't characters on the tube but real people. Someone like Diana Friedman. "When I was watching television as a kid, my older sister used to tell me that if I could see them, then they could see me too," says Friedman, 33, a freelance writer who, as a child in Manhattan, fixated on "The Brady Bunch" kids as well as their four-bedroom, three-bath California split-level house.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2006 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
TRANSFORMING a bare stage into a realistic art institution, replete with works by master painters -- and doing it twice in two very different venues -- was the challenge faced by set designers Victoria Bellocq and James Eric. Thomas Gibbons' "Permanent Collection" is inspired by a real-life dispute at Philadelphia's Barnes Foundation, home to an eclectic assortment of 19th and 20th century paintings and other pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The actors in "Tombstone" (citywide) playing bad guys and good guys and in-between guys spit very convincingly. They also slouch well and reach for their pistols with aplomb. So much for authenticity. Just about everything else in this aggressively overlong Western about trouble in Tombstone seems posed and facetious. It's the latest in a new line of designer Westerns--not quite as loony or self-infatuated as "Posse" but close enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
When it came to designing this year's Oscar sets, Derek McLane didn't have to look far for inspiration. McLane, a Tony Award-winning set designer who has crafted the scenery for such Broadway shows as "33 Variations," "I Am My Own Wife," "The Heiress" and the upcoming "Breakfast at Tiffany's," stole an idea from his own New York apartment - an installation of 35 industrial lamps on a wall, each in its own cubbyhole, backed by an antique mirror....
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Leslie Van Buskirk
The “Friends” gang might have painted the walls a cheery yellow and brought in lots of candy-colored furniture. The “Gossip Girl” brats would have made fun of anyone poor enough to live there, and Carrie probably would have been too horrified to allow her “Sex and the City” Manolos to touch the scratched floors. But the unrenovated Brooklyn brownstone where TV's modern-day Sherlock Holmes rests his head and solves some of the Big Apple's twistiest crimes hits some amusing -- and timely -- decorating notes.
HOME & GARDEN
July 30, 2011 | By David A. Keeps, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As "True Blood" speeds along into Season 4, witches may have joined the cast of vampires, shape-shifters, werewolves, fairies and cat people, but changes on the domestic front are what have really put design fans under a spell. In painstaking detail, "True Blood" production designer Suzuki Ingerslev answered questions about the inspirations and resources used to create striking residences for the show's characters including Bill Compton (played by Stephen Moyer), Vampire King of Louisiana, and Eric Northman (Alexander Skarsgard)
IMAGE
February 28, 2010 | Nora Zelevansky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Celebrities pull focus. And rightfully so: That is their job, after all. Annual Academy Awards evenings are no exception. Billy Crystal flies across the stage (and into Charlie Chaplin films), appropriating "Ol' Man River" and "People (Who Need People)" for his best-picture-themed musical revues. George Clooney, Sandra Bullock and other mega-stars read nonchalantly from teleprompters, adding improvised winks or quips. Hordes of hopeful dancers don garish costumes to tango or crunk through elaborate best-original-song performances.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2009 | Richard Verrier
The Art Directors Guild said Thursday that it had put the finishing touches on its controversial merger with two smaller unions representing illustrators and set designers. The guild said it had combined the operations of the three unions and named a new 20-member board with representatives from each craft. As expected, Scott Roth will remain as executive director of the guild, which now has 2,000 members, up from 1,500.
HOME & GARDEN
December 27, 2007 | Christy Hobart, Special to The Times
CHANCES are you've seen the grand entry before. And the immense hallway. You've probably seen the kitchen, the dining room and a bedroom or two. Greystone Mansion, the house designed by Gordon Kaufman and completed in 1928 as a gift from oil tycoon Edward Doheny to his son, is a versatile estate that film crews descend upon often for its opulent beauty, acres of manicured grounds and Beverly Hills location.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
Backstage at South Coast Repertory, the cast and crew call it "the battle of the sets." In one corner: "Search and Destroy," Howard Korder's chronicle of a man who will do anything for success in the get-ahead '80s. The spare Mainstage set is sleek, cold and immaculate. In the other corner: "Holy Days," Sally Nemeth's tale of two farm couples surviving the Kansas Dust Bowl during the Depression a half-century earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Up on the Shubert Theatre stage, Grover Dale leads a clutch of young dancers through scenes from "West Side Story." Over and over again, the Jets strut across the stage, snapping their fingers, leaping, snarling at the Sharks. Rehearsals were winding down for "Jerome Robbins' Broadway," set to open Wednesday in Century City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2007 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Newell Taylor Reynolds, an architect and a set designer for the Bella Lewitzky Dance Company until it disbanded 10 years ago, died Wednesday. He was 91. Reynolds, who was married to Lewitzky from 1940 until her death in 2004, died at the home of his daughter, Nora Reynolds Daniel, in Sierra Madre. The cause was complications from a fall, she said. In the late 1930s, Reynolds began a career as a dancer in Los Angeles with the Horton Dance Group, founded by Lester Horton.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2006 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
TRANSFORMING a bare stage into a realistic art institution, replete with works by master painters -- and doing it twice in two very different venues -- was the challenge faced by set designers Victoria Bellocq and James Eric. Thomas Gibbons' "Permanent Collection" is inspired by a real-life dispute at Philadelphia's Barnes Foundation, home to an eclectic assortment of 19th and 20th century paintings and other pieces.
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