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Seth Godin

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BUSINESS
June 16, 1999 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marketing guru Seth Godin wants your permission to send you a portion of his new book by e-mail for free. He hopes you'll like the first 85 pages so much that you'll want to buy the entire 255-page book for $24. Godin, vice president of direct marketing at Yahoo, talked his publisher into allowing the deal to demonstrate the principles espoused in his book, "Permission Marketing" (Simon & Schuster, 1999). Thanks in part to the giveaway, the book is among Amazon.
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BUSINESS
June 16, 1999 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marketing guru Seth Godin wants your permission to send you a portion of his new book by e-mail for free. He hopes you'll like the first 85 pages so much that you'll want to buy the entire 255-page book for $24. Godin, vice president of direct marketing at Yahoo, talked his publisher into allowing the deal to demonstrate the principles espoused in his book, "Permission Marketing" (Simon & Schuster, 1999). Thanks in part to the giveaway, the book is among Amazon.
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BUSINESS
September 28, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
AOL has recruited some Hollywood heavyweights to revitalize its struggling year-old online entertainment site Cambio, aimed at teens and young adults — a demographic coveted by advertisers. Reality television producer Mark Burnett and director McG, best known for the "Charlie's Angels" movies and NBC's spy comedy "Chuck," will create original Web shows with production spending as big as any prime-time series. AOL and its investment partners — brand strategist MGX Lab and Jonas Group, which manages such musical acts as the Jonas Brothers, Demi Lovato and Jordin Sparks — are betting that recognizable screenwriters, actors and directors are the digital catnip needed to draw a greater share of the 49 million people ages 12 to 24 who go online.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Hoping to defuse pressure for further government indecency crackdowns, networks and cable companies are borrowing a Web page from the playbook of their critics. A new coalition called TV Watch, bankrolled in part by CBS parent Viacom Inc., Fox owner News Corp. and NBC Universal, recently launched an Internet site, at televisionwatch.org.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2012 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
A Vice magazine writer newly arrived from London recently put out a top 10 list of reasons to hate Los Angeles, and one had the ring of truth: Nobody here will tell you what they do for a living. The writer, Jamie Lee Curtis Taete, said that's because everyone pretends to be mega-successful or to work in Hollywood, but I have a different take: Jobs you can easily make sense of are going the way of the floppy disc. Butcher, baker, candlestick-maker? All vanishing. In their place are buzzy-sounding, multi-syllabic titles involving social media, the cloud and other nebulae.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2010 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
Joe Konrath can't wait for his books to go out of print. When that happens, the 40-year-old crime novelist plans to reclaim the copyrights from his publisher, Hyperion Books, and self-publish them on Amazon.com, Apple Inc.'s iBooks and other online outlets. That way he'll be able to collect 70% of the sale price, compared with the 6% to 18% he receives from Hyperion. As for future novels, Konrath plans to self-publish all of them in digital form without having to leave his house in Schaumburg, Ill. "I doubt I'll ever have another traditional print deal," said the author of "Whiskey Sour," "Bloody Mary" and other titles.
NEWS
May 13, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the Internet's reputation as privacy's gravest modern threat, consumers are increasingly finding more safeguards on the Net than off. A study released Wednesday offers new evidence of this trend, showing a sharp rise in the number of Web sites that post policies telling people what information is collected from them and how it is used.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2005 | Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writer
Success in advertising usually means getting people to part with their hard-earned cash. Ray DeThorne's success is measured by how many people he can get to let go of their sons and daughters. As brand manager for the Army's advertising account at Leo Burnett Inc., a Chicago ad agency, DeThorne's job is to sell the Army. And these days, it's a difficult product to sell. In marketing terms, the Army is a troubled brand.
MAGAZINE
December 21, 2003 | Matthew Heller, Matthew Heller last wrote for the magazine about the sons of convicted murderer Sante Kimes.
Alyx Sachs is raging about the clutter in her e-mailbox. "I hate spam!" she says of unwanted electronic solicitations, and with so much vehemence it seems as if she's distancing herself from some odious accusation. She recalls recently logging into her Yahoo e-mail account and missing two important messages because Yahoo had filtered them into her bulk e-mail--that is, spam--folder. "My e-mail's getting censored by ISPs," she grumbles, referring to Internet service providers.
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