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Seth Greenland

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July 6, 2008
Seth GREENLAND'S very funny second novel shows how easily money rubs out our naive notions of right and wrong, especially in a city like L.A., where trying to be decent can seem not merely foolish but self-destructive and self-indulgent. Greenland's hero, Marcus Ripps, starts out as a middle-class guy with a wife, a son and a two-story, three-bedroom house in an unfashionable neighborhood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012
Panel: Fiction: At Loose Ends When: April 21, 12:00 p.m. Where: Annenberg Auditorium on the USC campus Who: Seth Greenland, Eleanor Henderson, Josh Rolnick, Jervey Tervalon, moderator Rachel Resnick Information: http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012
Panel: Fiction: At Loose Ends When: April 21, 12:00 p.m. Where: Annenberg Auditorium on the USC campus Who: Seth Greenland, Eleanor Henderson, Josh Rolnick, Jervey Tervalon, moderator Rachel Resnick Information: http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Angry Buddhist A Novel Seth Greenland Europa Editions: 400 pp., $16 paper Seth Greenland's "The Angry Buddhist" begins with two sexy American women getting matching tattoos in Puerto Vallarta - and then it swiftly jumps forward into the madcap final week of a congressional race out in the desert around Palm Springs. The incumbent, a wily and infinitely pragmatic political sleazebag named Randall Duke, finds himself facing a new kind of problem, namely, an opponent who might actually defeat him. Her name is Mary Swain, and here she is, observed at a rally by the angry Buddhist of the title, one of Randall's brothers, the busted cop called Jimmy Ray Duke: "She glides to the microphone and Jimmy notes the burnished skin, the blinding smile, the five hundred dollars' worth of blond highlights, fitted red blouse set off against the matching white linen skin and jacket that wraps her like cellophane.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Angry Buddhist A Novel Seth Greenland Europa Editions: 400 pp., $16 paper Seth Greenland's "The Angry Buddhist" begins with two sexy American women getting matching tattoos in Puerto Vallarta - and then it swiftly jumps forward into the madcap final week of a congressional race out in the desert around Palm Springs. The incumbent, a wily and infinitely pragmatic political sleazebag named Randall Duke, finds himself facing a new kind of problem, namely, an opponent who might actually defeat him. Her name is Mary Swain, and here she is, observed at a rally by the angry Buddhist of the title, one of Randall's brothers, the busted cop called Jimmy Ray Duke: "She glides to the microphone and Jimmy notes the burnished skin, the blinding smile, the five hundred dollars' worth of blond highlights, fitted red blouse set off against the matching white linen skin and jacket that wraps her like cellophane.
BOOKS
April 17, 2005 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
"The BONES" is a snapshot of the point at which the careers and destinies of two very different men intersect, collide and explode. Frank Bones, an outlaw comedian with a serious substance-abuse problem whose last chance at success is a sitcom in which he is to play an Eskimo, is clearly on the way down. And Lloyd Melnick, a television writer with a 10-figure development deal and a big new house in Brentwood, is on the way up.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2005 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
On a recent morning, Seth Greenland sits in his Santa Monica office wearing black jeans and a gray pullover, trying to keep his sense of balance intact. Outwardly calm, soft-spoken even, the 49-year-old is, by his own admission, that rarest of human specimens: a writer on the verge of getting what he wants. For more than two decades, Greenland has toiled in the trenches of the entertainment industry, doing everything from writing gags for stand-ups to working on sitcoms such as "a.k.a.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Who's the Man?" (countywide), a raucous, laugh-out-loud comedy, introduces to the screen Doctor Dre and Ed Lover, MTV rap stars, who can be as funny as they are goofy. As Harlem barbers they're so bad their boss strong-arms them into taking a police academy exam. Don't ask why he thinks this would be a good idea, especially since Doctor Dre is about 200 pounds overweight for the job. Naturally, they pass, much to their surprise, if not ours.
MAGAZINE
July 6, 2008 | Laurie Winer
Seth Greenland really knows how to take a mild-mannered Van Nuysian and put him through the ringer. Pity Marcus Ripps, the hero of Greenland's new comic novel, "Shining City." He's a husband and father who is ripped from middle-class complacency when his job gets tossed to China and he inherits a dry cleaner that fronts for a prostitution ring. For Marcus, it's Guangdong or pimping, and on top of that he has a bar mitzvah to throw.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2011
COMEDY Demetri Martin Actor Jeff Garlin hosts an evening with Martin, a comedian known for his witty songs, ironic observations and wordplay. Martin will chat with Garlin, take audience questions, and sign and discuss his new book, "This Is a Book. " Proceeds from the show will support efforts to free the West Memphis Three, three men seeking retrial after being convicted in the 1993 killing of three Cub Scouts. Largo at the Coronet , 366 N. La Cienega Blvd., L.A. 8 p.m. $30. (310)
BOOKS
July 6, 2008
Seth GREENLAND'S very funny second novel shows how easily money rubs out our naive notions of right and wrong, especially in a city like L.A., where trying to be decent can seem not merely foolish but self-destructive and self-indulgent. Greenland's hero, Marcus Ripps, starts out as a middle-class guy with a wife, a son and a two-story, three-bedroom house in an unfashionable neighborhood.
BOOKS
April 17, 2005 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to the Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
"The BONES" is a snapshot of the point at which the careers and destinies of two very different men intersect, collide and explode. Frank Bones, an outlaw comedian with a serious substance-abuse problem whose last chance at success is a sitcom in which he is to play an Eskimo, is clearly on the way down. And Lloyd Melnick, a television writer with a 10-figure development deal and a big new house in Brentwood, is on the way up.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2005 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
On a recent morning, Seth Greenland sits in his Santa Monica office wearing black jeans and a gray pullover, trying to keep his sense of balance intact. Outwardly calm, soft-spoken even, the 49-year-old is, by his own admission, that rarest of human specimens: a writer on the verge of getting what he wants. For more than two decades, Greenland has toiled in the trenches of the entertainment industry, doing everything from writing gags for stand-ups to working on sitcoms such as "a.k.a.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2011
BOOKS Meghan Daum L.A. Times columnist Meghan Daum will moderate a panel about fiction and narrative nonfiction at Skylight Books. Those answering the questions are local memoirists and novelists James Brown ("This River"), Seth Greenland ("Shining City"), Diana Wagman ("Spontaneous") and Leslie Schwartz ("Angels Crest"). The discussion is sure to be lively and timely. Skylight Books, 1818 N. Vermont Ave., L.A. 7:30 p.m. Free. (323) 660-1175; skylightbooks.com . EVENTS LA Comedy Fest 365 This year-round comedy series highlighting up-and-coming comedians and filmmakers presents two shows by local improv groups: the trio Circle One and the colorfully named Yellow-Bellied Marmots.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
NEW YORK -- Partway through my Sunday panel at the Brooklyn Book Festival, the subject turned to archetypes of Los Angeles. We - the novelists Seth Greenland (“The Angry Buddhist”),  Emma Straub (“Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures”), Karolina Waclawiak (“How to Get Into the Twin Palms”) and myself - were there to discuss the literature of Southern California. Cognitive dissonance, perhaps … or maybe a sign that, 55 years after L.A. stole the Dodgers, Brooklyn has come around.
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