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Seth Warshavsky

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MAGAZINE
June 13, 1999 | MARK EHRMAN, Mark Ehrman's last piece for the magazine was on Richard Simmons' "Cruise to Lose" program
The pictures of Luciana are not responding." It's 11 p.m. Seth Warshavsky is home, in a spacious condo 23 floors above the Seattle waterfront, but still awake, still working, still on the phone. His day began 20 hours earlier in Miami and, having been gone all of one weekend, a backlog of crises awaits. Most pressing: "The Mick Jagger girl."
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BUSINESS
July 7, 2000 | SHARON WAXMAN, WASHINGTON POST
Internet porn mogul Seth Warshavsky and his Seattle-based company are being investigated for possible credit card fraud and income tax evasion, according to former associates who said they have been questioned by federal agents. Warshavsky, founder and chief executive of Internet Entertainment Group Inc., said he had heard he was under investigation, but added that he has done nothing wrong.
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MAGAZINE
July 18, 1999
For Internet pornographer Seth Warshavsky to label himself a journalist is outrageous ("Sue Me," by Mark Ehrman, June 13). The tone of your article indicates to me that he's a self-absorbed young man more concerned about his wallet than the 1st Amendment. Pornographic images do have an impact: What we see affects what we think. If that were not true, the top 10 advertisers in the country would not be spending more than $5 billion a year to entice us to buy their products. Numerous research studies have highlighted significant negative effects of pornography.
MAGAZINE
July 18, 1999
For Internet pornographer Seth Warshavsky to label himself a journalist is outrageous ("Sue Me," by Mark Ehrman, June 13). The tone of your article indicates to me that he's a self-absorbed young man more concerned about his wallet than the 1st Amendment. Pornographic images do have an impact: What we see affects what we think. If that were not true, the top 10 advertisers in the country would not be spending more than $5 billion a year to entice us to buy their products. Numerous research studies have highlighted significant negative effects of pornography.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1997 | MICHELLE V. RAFTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Michelle V. Rafter is a contributor to The Cutting Edge. Reach her at mvrafter@deltanet.com
In many ways, Seth Warshavsky is a typical Internet publisher. He's spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on a Web site, and even more on computer servers and high-speed phone lines to make it easy for people to log on. He subscribes to a Web audit service and pays bounties to other sites that send customers his way. Even Warshavsky's age--23--isn't remarkable in an industry teeming with whiz kids. But Warshavsky is anything but average.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2000 | SHARON WAXMAN, WASHINGTON POST
Internet porn mogul Seth Warshavsky and his Seattle-based company are being investigated for possible credit card fraud and income tax evasion, according to former associates who said they have been questioned by federal agents. Warshavsky, founder and chief executive of Internet Entertainment Group Inc., said he had heard he was under investigation, but added that he has done nothing wrong.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
Sex and money are two of the most popular topics on the Web, so it was just a matter of time before someone put them together. That fateful day came Friday with the debut of SexQuotes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000 | ANN W. O'NEILL
Father's Day . . . Madonna's $5-million cameo . . . Who's in Charge? As far as we're concerned, the only gorgeous George who matters is George Clooney. But a retired pro wrestler is suing a porn Web site in federal court over the use of the name "Gorgeous George." Randy "Macho Man" Savage says he owns the rights to the moniker "Gorgeous George." According to his suit, Savage licensed the name temporarily to Stephanie Bellars, who used it to create her own wrestling persona a couple of years ago.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An improbable plan for two Southern California teens to broadcast their first sexual encounter on the Internet is a moneymaking hoax, according to a Seattle company hired to provide the computer equipment for the event. Internet Entertainment Group, which had signed a contract to supply the computer hardware, said organizers planned to charge Internet users $5 each and then not deliver on their promise that the couple would have sex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | Shawn Hubler
Her patio no longer features call girls lounging poolside. For that matter, it no longer features a pool. Except for the fact that it's in Hollywood, nothing about the plain gray stucco house in the canyon hints that the former Hollywood Madam now lives there, except, of course, for the familiar face at the door. "Hey."
MAGAZINE
June 13, 1999 | MARK EHRMAN, Mark Ehrman's last piece for the magazine was on Richard Simmons' "Cruise to Lose" program
The pictures of Luciana are not responding." It's 11 p.m. Seth Warshavsky is home, in a spacious condo 23 floors above the Seattle waterfront, but still awake, still working, still on the phone. His day began 20 hours earlier in Miami and, having been gone all of one weekend, a backlog of crises awaits. Most pressing: "The Mick Jagger girl."
BUSINESS
March 17, 1997 | MICHELLE V. RAFTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Michelle V. Rafter is a contributor to The Cutting Edge. Reach her at mvrafter@deltanet.com
In many ways, Seth Warshavsky is a typical Internet publisher. He's spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on a Web site, and even more on computer servers and high-speed phone lines to make it easy for people to log on. He subscribes to a Web audit service and pays bounties to other sites that send customers his way. Even Warshavsky's age--23--isn't remarkable in an industry teeming with whiz kids. But Warshavsky is anything but average.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1998 | AL MARTINEZ
Among the erotic fantasies I have never entertained is one of Dr. Laura prancing about in the nude. It hadn't occurred to me that radio's Queen of Morality would ever do that sort of thing so I never included her. I may have to rethink my fantasies. I refer, of course, to Dr. Laura Schlessinger, the talky-preachy St. Laura of radio station KFI whose nude photographs are the hit of sleaze Internet.
NATIONAL
November 27, 2005 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Ruth Parasol has made a fortune selling vice to the masses. Through phone sex, then Web porn and most recently online poker, the 38-year-old lawyer has leveraged a succession of new technologies to become a self-made billionaire whose net worth rivals those of Internet entrepreneur Mark Cuban and Las Vegas mogul Steve Wynn. Like Cuban, Parasol was quick to recognize the Internet's power to transform daily life.
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