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Seth Wescott

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SPORTS
February 16, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
Going from fourth place to first on dry, flat land: Hard. Going from fourth to first careening down a tight, slushy course on a snowboard: Harder. Doing it at the Winter Olympics: Priceless. Improvisation, thy name is Seth Wescott. The 33-year-old Wescott went from last to first Monday afternoon in the men's snowboard cross final at Cypress Mountain, holding off crowd favorite Mike Robertson at the finish line to win the U.S.'s second gold medal. Wescott, of Sugarloaf, Maine, remains the only winner of this event at the Olympics, having captured the inaugural snowboard cross four years ago in Turin, Italy.
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SPORTS
February 16, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
Going from fourth place to first on dry, flat land: Hard. Going from fourth to first careening down a tight, slushy course on a snowboard: Harder. Doing it at the Winter Olympics: Priceless. Improvisation, thy name is Seth Wescott. The 33-year-old Wescott went from last to first Monday afternoon in the men's snowboard cross final at Cypress Mountain, holding off crowd favorite Mike Robertson at the finish line to win the U.S.'s second gold medal. Wescott, of Sugarloaf, Maine, remains the only winner of this event at the Olympics, having captured the inaugural snowboard cross four years ago in Turin, Italy.
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SPORTS
February 16, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
He lunged forward, dived ahead, twisting his body and board down the snowy banks of Cypress Mountain, skidding into gold. And then Seth Wescott reached back. Back to a grandfather who taught him about patriotism, a father who taught him about strength, an heirloom that will connect them forever. Did you see the size of that American flag Wescott draped around his chilled body after winning his second consecutive gold medal in the men's snowboard cross Monday? It's not just big. It's three generations big. It's family big. It's the flag that was given to his grandfather Ben as a reward for service in the Army during World War II. It's the flag that was handed down to his father, Jim, upon Ben's death 22 years ago. It's the flag that Jim brought to Seth after the victory four years ago in Turin, Italy, the old man leaping over a barrier and rushing past the cops to give the kid a piece of his past.
SPORTS
February 16, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
He lunged forward, dived ahead, twisting his body and board down the snowy banks of Cypress Mountain, skidding into gold. And then Seth Wescott reached back. Back to a grandfather who taught him about patriotism, a father who taught him about strength, an heirloom that will connect them forever. Did you see the size of that American flag Wescott draped around his chilled body after winning his second consecutive gold medal in the men's snowboard cross Monday? It's not just big. It's three generations big. It's family big. It's the flag that was given to his grandfather Ben as a reward for service in the Army during World War II. It's the flag that was handed down to his father, Jim, upon Ben's death 22 years ago. It's the flag that Jim brought to Seth after the victory four years ago in Turin, Italy, the old man leaping over a barrier and rushing past the cops to give the kid a piece of his past.
SPORTS
February 15, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
They are now the coolest kids in the cafeteria -- or if you want to take the school analogy one step further -- on campus. (Not that they'd all make it to class consistently.) Forget the guys from the conventional, old-school sports. The men's snowboarders, not exactly a news flash, are hip at the Winter Olympics. Maybe because they aren't forcing the issue in some contrived way. "We were the outsiders, and the jocks are cool in high school and now [it is] the board people," said Peter Foley, coach of the U.S. snowboarding team.
SPORTS
February 17, 2006 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Half a snowboard ... That was the difference between gold and silver, and between a tremendous boost for a declining sport in the United States and merely a solid one. And for a veteran snowboarder who has waited eight years to compete in his first Olympics, it was the difference between a glorious conclusion and an admirable one.
SPORTS
February 18, 2006 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
After U.S. snowboarding sensations Hannah Teter and Gretchen Bleiler had gone 1-2 this week in the Olympic women's halfpipe, Teter, amid the frenzy of cameras, notebooks, TV producers, autograph hounds, doping protocols, snapshot requests, American flags, TV morning shows and medal ceremonies, said, "I can't even comprehend the coolness factor of what we just achieved." Bleiler echoed the emotion: "It's pretty insane." Fortunately, she added, "Peter and his guys are so on it."
SPORTS
February 16, 2006
The injury during practice to Jayson Hale (knee, sidelined today) should not hurt the United States' chances of getting to the podium. Nate Holland, X Games champion; Seth Wescott, 2005 world champion; and Jason Smith have taken a liking to the long track. The man to beat is Xavier Delerue of France, the three-time World Cup champion who seems to have recovered from a foot injury suffered last month during a World Cup event. Drew Neilson of Canada also has looked sharp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2010
Healthcare Summit President Obama's meeting with congressional leaders will be broadcast live on CSPAN3. CNN plans extensive coverage throughout the day; MSNBC offers live coverage until 11 a.m.; Fox News will provide special coverage throughout the day. 7 a.m. through 1 p.m. The Early Show Johnny Depp; Tim Burton. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Cesar Millan. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Ree Drummond. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Regis and Kelly Bruce Willis.
SPORTS
January 23, 2006 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
An agent for one of the halfpipe riders trying to qualify for the Olympics commented recently, "They might as well just give Shaun White the gold medal now and have everybody else compete for the silver and bronze." White, 19, who Sunday concluded an unprecedented sweep of all five U.S. Snowboard Grand Prix events, would seem to be the United States' best hope to strike gold in the Winter Games next month at Turin, Italy.
SPORTS
February 15, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
They are now the coolest kids in the cafeteria -- or if you want to take the school analogy one step further -- on campus. (Not that they'd all make it to class consistently.) Forget the guys from the conventional, old-school sports. The men's snowboarders, not exactly a news flash, are hip at the Winter Olympics. Maybe because they aren't forcing the issue in some contrived way. "We were the outsiders, and the jocks are cool in high school and now [it is] the board people," said Peter Foley, coach of the U.S. snowboarding team.
SPORTS
February 18, 2006 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
After U.S. snowboarding sensations Hannah Teter and Gretchen Bleiler had gone 1-2 this week in the Olympic women's halfpipe, Teter, amid the frenzy of cameras, notebooks, TV producers, autograph hounds, doping protocols, snapshot requests, American flags, TV morning shows and medal ceremonies, said, "I can't even comprehend the coolness factor of what we just achieved." Bleiler echoed the emotion: "It's pretty insane." Fortunately, she added, "Peter and his guys are so on it."
SPORTS
February 17, 2006 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Half a snowboard ... That was the difference between gold and silver, and between a tremendous boost for a declining sport in the United States and merely a solid one. And for a veteran snowboarder who has waited eight years to compete in his first Olympics, it was the difference between a glorious conclusion and an admirable one.
SPORTS
January 27, 2006 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The winds of change swirling through this posh mountain retreat have delivered a hint of impetuousness: attitude to be complemented, over the next five days, by amplitude. The Flying Tomato, Big Dan, Lucky Lindsey and other young athletes have arrived, along with their families, friends and thousands of fans, for the Winter X Games. Remarkably, the upscale populace has embraced this brief transformation from haughty to hip.
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