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October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
The racist comments purportedly made by Donald Sterling in the audio recording that surfaced Saturday via TMZ.com are the latest in a years-long string of racially charged incidents linked to the real estate mogul. In 2009, Sterling agreed to a $2.765-million settlement in a case that alleged discrimination against African Americans, Latinos and others at apartment buildings he owned in Los Angeles County. Sterling denied the charges by the Justice Department and in two separate lawsuits by former tenants.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2012 | By Anh Do, Los Angeles Times
A group of Filipino nurses who claimed they were mocked for their accents and ordered to speak "English only" won a nearly $1-million settlement against a Central California hospital where bosses and co-workers were allegedly urged to eavesdrop on the immigrant workers. The $975,000 settlement, announced Monday by lawyers from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, is believed to be the largest language discrimination settlement in the U.S. healthcare industry, according to the Asian Pacific American Legal Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
An oil operation that sent noxious fumes into a South Los Angeles neighborhood has agreed to spend about $700,000 on upgrades to prevent future hazardous emissions, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday. The settlement capped a four-month investigation by the EPA into Allenco Energy Inc. that was prompted by hundreds of complaints of chemical odors, respiratory ailments, nosebleeds and other health problems in the University Park community, about a half-mile north of USC. "The company must notify the EPA that they have completed the improvements at least 15 days before reopening," said Jared Blumenfeld, the EPA's regional administrator for the Pacific Southwest.
WORLD
October 31, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Israel has announced that it is advancing plans to build settlements in the West Bank and Jerusalem amid sharp international criticism that the projects will hurt the peace process with the Palestinians. Hours after releasing a group of Palestinian prisoners Tuesday night, Israel announced the renewal of several developments in the Jerusalem area on lands annexed after the 1967 war, which Palestinians claim for a future state. A number of the projects announced are not new, such as the expansion of the northeast Jewish neighborhood of Ramat Shlomo by 1,500 units.
WORLD
December 17, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Israel gave a green light Monday to 1,500 new units of Jewish housing in the Ramat Shlomo development in the northern Jerusalem area, an expansion that had triggered a diplomatic rift with the U.S. after it was first announced during a 2010 visit to Israel by Vice President Joe Biden. The project, located on land Israel seized during the 1967 Middle East war, had been largely dormant after the Obama administration complained that the timing of the announcement during Biden's trip was an “insult.” The U.S. opposes Israeli settlement on land beyond the 1967 Green Line, considering it an obstacle to peace talks.
WORLD
June 12, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- As U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry is poised to return to the region, Israel is advancing a plan for a large-scale expansion of a West Bank settlement, according to Israeli media reports. Plans for more than 600 housing units in the settlement of Itamar were recently submitted to authorities, the reports say. If completed, the new construction would significantly expand the settlement, which currently has about 1,200 residents. A previous government pledged more housing for Itamar after five family members were killed in an attack in their home.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- With the nine months initially allotted by U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry to Israeli-Palestinian peace talks more than halfway spent and a rumored American plan nearing, a scrambling for a foothold appears underway. Speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, over the weekend, Kerry cautioned both sides of the consequences of failure. The demographic dynamic will make it impossible for Israel to remain Jewish and democratic, Kerry said, adding that “the status quo, my friends ... will not last forever.” As for the Palestinians, they will be no closer to sovereignty or controlling their own fate and economy, Kerry said.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles
If you lived in California between 1999 and 2006 and purchased an electronic device with an LCD panel -- such as a computer monitor, laptop or all-in-one PC -- you may be eligible as a claimant on a $500-million price-fixing settlement between hardware makers and California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris' office. The California Department of Justice on Friday said that consumers should check lcdclass.com , call (855) 115-1886 or write to LCD Class, P.O.Box 8025, Faribault, MN 55021, to obtain a copy of the settlement and register to receive a claim form.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Google Inc. has reached a tentative settlement with European antitrust regulators to end an investigation into allegations it abused its search-engine dominance to promote its own services over those of rivals. The deal, announced Wednesday in Brussels, could end a lengthy probe and allow Google to avoid a large fine and other penalties from European regulators. Under the settlement, Google has promised that whenever it promotes its own specialized services in search results it also will promote the services of three competitors, the European Union's competition commissioner said.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
A South Bay woman who sued the Transportation Security Administration over the way agents treated her for trying to bring breast milk on a plane said she won a settlement. The woman, Stacey Armato, said the TSA agreed to pay her $75,000 to settle the suit, as well as retraining all screeners to better treat travelers carrying breast milk. "That's a big deal," she said in an interview. "I expect a lot of changes. " TSA officials declined to comment, saying the settlement has not been finalized and the agency still has 30 days to request a dismissal.
WORLD
April 22, 2014 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- With Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations still deadlocked a week before their current round expires, negotiating teams met Tuesday with U.S. envoy Martin Indyk in Jerusalem to discuss extending the troubled talks. Nine months of meetings between Israeli and Palestinian teams have yielded little agreement, and both sides' tough positions have stymied the effort to secure a framework for working toward a two-state solution to the conflict. The U.S.-mediated negotiations broke down last month over Israel's delay in releasing a group of Palestinian prisoners as promised.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
University of California regents agreed to pay $10 million to the former chairman of UCLA's orthopedic surgery department, who had alleged that the well-known medical school allowed doctors to take industry payments that may have compromised patient care. The settlement reached Tuesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court came just before closing arguments were due to begin in a whistleblower-retaliation case brought by Dr. Robert Pedowitz, 54, a surgeon who was recruited to UCLA in 2009 to run the orthopedic surgery department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
When she was 4, Doris Pilkington Garimara was uprooted from her home in western Australia and sent to a camp for "half-caste" aboriginals, where she grew up believing she had been abandoned and forgotten by her mother. Decades passed before she learned the full story - one that would not only answer painful questions about her past but help Australians understand one of the ugliest chapters in theirs. Pilkington Garimara and her mother belonged to "the stolen generations" - the estimated 100,000 children of mixed aboriginal and white ancestry who by government edict were snatched from their homes and reared in desolate settlements.
WORLD
April 16, 2014 | By Maher Abukhater
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas told Israeli lawmakers on Wednesday that it was still possible to revive moribund peace negotiations. Abbas told five Israeli opposition legislators from the Labor and Meretz parties that he was willing to extend the negotiations past their April 29 deadline "if the Israeli side commits to the principles that can allow an extension," his spokesman Nabil Abu Rudeineh said.  The Palestinians first want Israel to release a fourth group of Palestinian prisoners as promised, and to announce a total settlement freeze.
SPORTS
April 16, 2014 | By Sam Farmer, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
A federal judge in Philadelphia declined Wednesday to approve a proposed $765-million concussion settlement between the NFL and a group of retired players. [UPDATED, 4:30 p.m. PDT, April 16:  Although this was originally characterized as a setback for those pushing for a concussion settlement, attorneys for the plaintiffs clarified Wednesday afternoon that U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody's ruling was more of a procedural housekeeping item. The ruling was submitted electronically late Tuesday and was announced Wednesday.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Kelly Scott and David Ng
The warring parties in the "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark" lawsuits -- one-time director Julie Taymor  and the show's producers -- have reached what appears to be a tentative settlement. Judge Katherine B. Forrest issued an order Thursday reporting that the two parties have reached an agreement in principle, according to a court spokeswoman. The spokeswoman said she could not elaborate on the order. An official spokesman for "Spider-Man" said there was no comment on the matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
In an unforeseen upside to the electric-power market crisis of 2001, a new proposed legal settlement between utility NRG and the California Public Utilities Commission would bring more than $100 million in new electric-vehicle charging infrastructure to the state. Under the terms of the settlement, announced Friday by the commission and the Greenlining Institute, an advocacy group, NRG would be installing at least 200 public fast-charging stations and the infrastructure for 10,000 plug-in units at about 1,000 locations across the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Los Angeles County has agreed to a $7.9-million settlement with thousands of  people who were knocked off the welfare rolls when general relief grants swelled during the Great Recession, county and plaintiffs' spokesmen said Tuesday. Under the settlement, which must be approved by a judge, the county agreed to stop cutting off recipients' $221 general relief checks for early or unintentional violations of welfare-to-work rules, according to court documents.  At an annual cost to the county of $5.3 million, it also will stop reducing grants if people decide to share housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014
Anthony Wardlaw was fresh out of foster care three years ago when he went on general relief, Los Angeles County's $221-a-month welfare program for the destitute. When he tried to use the money to buy his mother a hamburger, his government debit card didn't work. And he had no idea why. According to a $7.9-million settlement agreement announced Tuesday, Wardlaw was one of thousands of people who were knocked off the welfare rolls without proper notice when applications swelled during the Great Recession.
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