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Settlements

NEWS
August 4, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government was ordered Tuesday to pay the heirs of amateur filmmaker Abraham Zapruder $16 million for seizing one of the nation's most macabre artifacts--the 26-second film capturing President John F. Kennedy's final moments. An arbitration panel charged with determining the value of the film said that the figure might be on the low side.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1995
The Pasadena City Council has agreed to pay $125,000 to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit filed by a former police cadet who said she was "repeatedly raped" by a superior while on the job and subjected to continuous intimidation, city officials announced Friday. The council approved the settlement with the former cadet in closed session Monday, officials said.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
An Encinitas man who claimed he was plied with drinks while he gambled away more than $1 million has reached an undisclosed settlement with two Las Vegas casinos. Stephen Roel, 54, filed a federal lawsuit in January, accusing the Las Vegas Hilton and the Mandalay Bay Resort of capitalizing on his alcoholism last fall by serving him alcohol while he was drunk and loaning him money to wager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of a tourist killed in a Christmas Eve, 1998, accident at Disneyland settled its claim against the park Wednesday, capping a case that focused the nation's attention on amusement park safety issues and spurred the state's first law regulating the industry. Terms of the settlement were sealed. An outside expert previously estimated the damages could top $20 million. Disneyland spokesman Ray Gomez declined comment.
WORLD
July 17, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM - The European Union's tightened guidelines restricting member nations from providing funds, grants, scholarships, financing or other assistance to Jewish settlements in the West Bank, have drawn sharp criticism from Israeli officials. Though the EU has long restricted such activity, the new guidelines - expected to be formally issued Friday - require that the practice be more explicitly stated in writing whenever assistance is provided to Israel. “All agreements between the State of Israel and the EU must unequivocally and explicitly indicate their inapplicability to the territories occupied by Israel in 1967," the guidelines state.
OPINION
June 28, 2009 | Yisrael Medad, Yisrael Medad, an American-born Israeli commentator, has lived in Shiloh since 1981. He is head of information resources at the Menachem Begin Heritage Center in Jerusalem and blogs at www.myrightword.blogspot.com.
No one, including a president of the United States of America, can presume to tell me, a Jew, that I cannot live in the area of my national homeland. That's one of the main reasons my wife and I chose in 1981 to move to Shiloh, a so-called settlement less than 30 miles north of Jerusalem. After Shiloh was founded in 1978, then-President Carter demanded of Prime Minister Menachem Begin that the village of eight families be removed.
OPINION
March 15, 2010
Aweek later, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is still apologizing for the timing of his government's announcement of plans to build 1,600 housing units in the Ramat Shlomo neighborhood of East Jerusalem. But Netanyahu is missing the point: The problem isn't the timing of the announcement, which came during Vice President Joe Biden's trip to renew peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians. It's the plan itself, under which Israel intends to build housing for Jews on land that was captured from Jordan in the 1967 Middle East war and subsequently annexed to Israel.
OPINION
July 12, 2012
Re "Panel urges legalization of West Bank outposts," July 10 The Israeli advisory panel is out of touch, even with the "only Jews count" view of many Israeli leaders. But it serves to illustrate how different values are between the United States and Israel. It is not that there are no racists in America; it is just that their views are so far out of the mainstream that they would never be appointed to serve on a national panel. This demonstrates again that Israel may be an ally, but Americans and Israelis do not share a dedication to democracy.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
On its website, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. says pursuing damages when banks fail is a way to restore public confidence in the industry. Doing so, it says in an analysis of the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s, creates “the perception as well as the reality that directors, officers and other professionals at financial institutions are held accountable for wrongful conduct.” But can confidence be restored if the public doesn't...
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