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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy and Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- An attorney who aided an investigation that resulted in fines against lobbyist Kevin Sloat said the settlement of the matter approved Thursday by the state Fair Political Practices Commission falls short and fails to address some of the most serious allegations involving elected officials. “It's not sufficient,” attorney Jesse Ortiz. “I think Mr. Sloat should be held accountable for all of his actions and not just some of them, which is what the FPPC decided to do.” Ortiz represents Rhonda Smira, a former employee of Sloat's lobbying firm who sued the lobbyist, claiming she was wrongly fired after complaining about illegal gifts and campaign contributions being made by the firm to a large number of members of the Legislature.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014
Join Times staff writer Victoria Kim for a discussion at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday on what officials say is the Los Angeles Archdiocese's final settlement of its pending priest molestation lawsuits. A decade of wrenching abuse litigation  has cost the Catholic Church more than $740 million. What is supposed to be the final settlement was reached last week with 17 victims for $13 million. That trial would have been about the alleged acts of Father Nicolas Aguilar-Rivera, a visiting cleric from Mexico who police believe molested more than two dozen boys over nine months in 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Jeremiah Dobruck
Newport Beach has agreed to a nearly $1-million settlement with three former officers who claim they were victims of a corrupt and retaliatory police department that passed them over for promotions by using tests designed to favor hand-picked candidates. Two of the ex-officers said a pair of past police chiefs and a former city administrator engaged in favoritism, and the third said he was demoted when he complained about the promotion practices. Former police lieutenants Craig Frizzell and Steve Shulman will each receive about $425,000 in the settlement.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Children's advocates are challenging a settlement in a class-action lawsuit in an effort to require Facebook to get explicit permission from parents before using the personal information - as well as the images, likes and comments - of teens in advertising on the giant social network. The advocates want the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to vacate the Facebook settlement. They say the settlement violates the law in seven states including California that require parents' permission before a child's image can be used in advertising.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014 | By Howard Blume, Richard Winton and Alan Zarembo
The Los Angeles Unified School District said it would not reverse its decision to fire former Miramonte Elementary teacher Martin Springer after charges against him were dropped Wednesday, officials said. L.A. County prosecutors canceled Springer's pending trial after the teacher's young accuser decided not to testify. Her family said the 12-year-old was too traumatized, "so we are unable to proceed at this time," said Jane Robison, a spokeswoman for the district attorney's office.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Google Inc. has reached a tentative settlement with European antitrust regulators to end an investigation into allegations it abused its search-engine dominance to promote its own services over those of rivals. The deal, announced Wednesday in Brussels, could end a lengthy probe and allow Google to avoid a large fine and other penalties from European regulators. Under the settlement, Google has promised that whenever it promotes its own specialized services in search results it also will promote the services of three competitors, the European Union's competition commissioner said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo and Howard Blume
Los Angeles County prosecutors have dropped their case against a Miramonte Elementary School teacher who became embroiled in a child-abuse scandal that rocked the Los Angeles school district and resulted in the costliest settlements in the system's history. The trial of Martin Springer was set to begin Wednesday morning, but his accuser, a 12-year-old girl who alleged that he had touched her leg several times, decided not to testify, officials said. "She's not saying these things didn't happen," Deputy Dist.
SPORTS
February 3, 2014 | By Sam Farmer
NEW YORK - Pete Carroll felt a lot of emotions Monday morning, hours after his Seattle Seahawks crushed Denver, 43-8, in Super Bowl XLVIII. He was proud, excited, drained, satisfied. But not surprised. "We developed a mentality from the first day we start talking about these kinds of moments, because this is exactly what we envisioned from Day 1," Carroll said at the traditional most-valuable-player news conference. Linebacker Malcolm Smith, who played for him at USC, won that award.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2014 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK - A New York state judge has approved nearly all of an $8.5-billion settlement between Bank of America and large investors who suffered losses in mortgage-backed bonds stemming from the housing meltdown. The settlement centers around mortgage-backed securities for which the Bank of New York Mellon Corp. acted as a trustee. Some of the claims in the 3-year-old case were not resolved, and the agreement still faces challenges despite the judge's approval. The case's resolution would help Bank of America put baggage stemming from the financial crisis behind it. The Charlotte, N.C.-based bank has struggled to lay to rest lingering fallout from its ill-fated 2008 acquisition of Countrywide Financial Corp., the Calabasas mortgage lender.
SPORTS
January 31, 2014 | By Gary Klein and Sam Farmer
  NEW YORK - NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said Friday that the league is working to persuade a federal judge that a proposed $765-million concussion settlement will work the way it was intended. "The No. 1 thing for us right now is to get the money in place so that we can help the players and their families if they need it, and that is our priority," Goodell said during his annual pre-Super Bowl news conference, which was held at a midtown theater. U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody this month denied preliminary approval of the proposed settlement between the NFL and more than 4,500 retired players because of concerns the money will be insufficient over the life of the deal.
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