Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSettlers
IN THE NEWS

Settlers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
May 1, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
The early American settlers called it "the starving time," and accounts of the winter of 1609-1610 were so ghastly, and so morbid, that scholars weren't sure if the stories were true. George Percy, then president of the English settlement of Jamestown in Virginia, wrote that settlers ate horses, then cats and dogs, then boots and bits of leather, and, finally, one another. "One of our colony murdered his wife, ripped the child out of her womb and threw it into the river, and after chopped the mother in pieces and salted her for his food," wrote Percy, who then ordered the man executed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
November 13, 2013 | By Maher Abukhater
RAMALLAH, West Bank -- Peace negotiators Saeb Erekat and Mohammed Shtayyeh have submitted their written resignations to Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, a member of the Palestine Liberation Organization's executive committee said Wednesday. Abbas told Egypt's CBC-TV that his negotiators have resigned over the lack of progress in U.S.-brokered talks with Israel and over Israeli settlement activity, Reuters news service reported. Hanan Ashrawi, a PLO official, told a Palestinian radio station that although the executive committee was not informed of the resignation, Erekat confirmed to her that he had submitted the letter to Abbas.
Advertisement
OPINION
January 25, 2006
Re "A first step in Hebron," editorial, Jan. 20 The Jewish settlers being removed from Hebron are illegally living in Palestinian-owned buildings and shops; they're no better than common thieves. As a Jewish American, I am revolted by the arrogance of those settlers who think that they can steal a person's property simply because that person is Palestinian. That is not the lesson taught us by the prophet Isaiah, who preached universal justice. The Israeli government is correct in removing the settlers and restoring the property to its rightful and legal owners.
WORLD
October 17, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Israeli construction in West Bank settlements has increased dramatically in 2013, according to a new report. According to the report by Peace Now, an anti-settlement advocacy group, construction of Jewish settlements in the West Bank  was up 70% from January to June this year, compared with the same period in 2012. The report offers a summary of the trends and numbers of Israeli settlements in the West Bank since the 1990s Oslo peace accords between Israel and the Palestinians, and the effects the settlements could have on the proposed two-state solution . To date, more than 340,000 settlers live in the West Bank, more than triple the number 20 years ago when the peace process began.
WORLD
September 18, 2011 | By Batsheva Sobelman, Los Angeles Times
Sitting at his computer, security officer Nitsan Brizel pans his remote surveillance cameras out to the main road below the West Bank settlement of Nili, then zooms back in to focus on a Palestinian worker at one of the construction sites in the expanding community. Brizel and other security officials in Israel's West Bank settlements are on high alert these days as Palestinians prepare to launch large demonstrations in support of their bid Friday for United Nations membership. Some fear the effort will trigger another violent Palestinian uprising, particularly if it is rejected.
OPINION
July 13, 2003
David Wilder asks why he and his fellow settlers must leave Hebron ("Why Stay in a Place of Fear? It's Home," Commentary, July 11). Hmmm. Perhaps because the settlements in the occupied territories violate international law. Perhaps because a few hundred religious fanatics should not be allowed to hold a city of 100,000 people, and the peace process, hostage. Perhaps because the Hebron settlers are largely a gang of hoodlums who love to terrorize and provoke the indigenous population.
TRAVEL
June 15, 2003
Regarding "No Scheme Behind the Indians' Fate" (June 1): If Indians did not want to integrate with whites, that was their choice. If I told letter writer Steven Foster to integrate with whomever, with no choice about it, how would he react? Foster talked about settler necessity, but he failed to realize that killing settlers was probably the only way the Indians thought they could survive. His last remark, "If they had won, you'd be vacationing somewhere else," is so callous and irresponsible that it is beyond comprehension.
NEWS
June 20, 1989 | From Times wire services
Shouting "traitor" and "go home," enraged Jewish settlers jeered Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir and nearly drowned out his speech today at the funeral of a slain U.S.-born Israeli citizen. Hundreds of Jews attended the tumultuous service for Frederick Rosenfeld, who was stabbed to death Saturday while hiking in an isolated area near the settlement of Ariel in the Israeli-occupied West Bank where he lived. While Rosenfeld's wooden casket was being lowered into a grave, several flag-waving Israelis yelled for revenge and a change in the government.
NEWS
November 7, 1985 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin on Wednesday ordered the closing of a West Bank newspaper for Jewish settlers because, he said, it incited its readers to revolt against the government. The paper, Aleph Yud, published an article last Sunday predicting the outbreak of a civil war if the authorities try to give up any of the territory Israel captured in the Six-Day War of 1967. The newspaper's editor, Yaakov Rahamim, said in an interview that the article was meant to warn, not incite.
OPINION
April 7, 2005
"A Time to Move, and Move On" (editorial, April 3) is a rare display of mostly balanced American journalism. It stands on the side of peace, coexistence and justice in the Arab-Israeli conflict. It is striking however that your editorial ignores U.N. Security Council Resolution 242 and the Geneva Convention, which state that the occupation and building of settlements on occupied lands are illegal. Our recent wars in the Persian Gulf, and pressure to force Syrian troops out of Lebanon, invoked U.N. resolutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2013 | By Philip Brandes
As a snapshot of Harlem in 1943, John Henry Redwood's “The Old Settler” evokes some historical artifacts that have faded into obscurity - party line telephones, the Savoy Ballroom - and others that stubbornly endure in more camouflaged form, i.e., segregationist tactics that stack the economic deck. Nevertheless, Redwood's 1998 romantic dramedy is first and foremost a humanist work with a vision of endurance and connectedness that transcends race and politics, and its best qualities are admirably served in William Stanford Davis' fine staging at the Pico Playhouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
LONE PINE, Calif. - Oral histories of Native Americans and U.S. Cavalry records offer insights into a horrific massacre here in 1863: Thirty-five Paiute Indians were chased into Owens Lake by settlers and soldiers to drown or be gunned down. But the records are silent on one important point. Exactly where did the massacre occur on the moonlit night of March 19, 1863? An archaeological find in what is today a vast alkali playa has revealed a cache of bullets, musket balls, cavalry uniform buttons and Native American artifacts that Paiute tribal members and researchers believe are evidence of the grim chapter in Owens Valley history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
The phone jangles in the bright white-walled computer shop off Hillhurst Avenue, and Ariel Belkin picks it up. "Los FEE-lus Hi-Tech," he says. "This is Ariel. " After the call comes his confession. Photos: It's all in the name The 30-year-old tech whiz, who also plays guitar in a band, moved to Los Feliz from the Valley a year and a half ago. Back then, he resolved to pronounce his new neighborhood as Los Fey-LEASE. The Spanish pronunciation, he says, is the "the right way. " But pretty soon he caved to the weird stares and smug corrections from locals and switched to the more common anglicized pronunciation.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
The early American settlers called it "the starving time," and accounts of the winter of 1609-1610 were so ghastly, and so morbid, that scholars weren't sure if the stories were true. George Percy, then president of the English settlement of Jamestown in Virginia, wrote that settlers ate horses, then cats and dogs, then boots and bits of leather, and, finally, one another. "One of our colony murdered his wife, ripped the child out of her womb and threw it into the river, and after chopped the mother in pieces and salted her for his food," wrote Percy, who then ordered the man executed.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Aspiring astronauts and wannabe reality TV stars, take note: A nonprofit that aims to send the first human colonists to Mars by 2023 will start taking applications in July of this year. Mars One, the Netherlands-based organization that wants to turn the colonizing of Mars into a global reality television phenomenon, is encouraging anyone who is interested in space travel to apply. Previous training in space travel is not required, nor is a science degree of any sort, but applicants do need to be at least 18 years of age and willing to leave Earth forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2013 | By David Kipen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The bigger the fight between a screenwriter and a director, the better the picture. It's an arrant generalization but not necessarily an errant one. Look at Budd Schulberg's battles with "On the Waterfront," or Robert Towne's over the ending of "Chinatown," or most if not all the writers on director Otto Preminger's best movies - few if any of whom could stand ever to work with him again. "The Searchers," which many critics and filmmakers consider the best western ever made, was written by a former film critic named Frank Nugent.
NEWS
November 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak warned settlers that he would send in soldiers to dismantle illegal West Bank outposts if they were not cleared out by Saturday, Israel Radio reported. Barak's decision came a day after he returned from meetings with Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat and President Clinton in Oslo designed to jump-start talks for a final peace treaty.
WORLD
November 17, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A group of Israeli soldiers disobeyed orders to help dismantle several structures that Jewish settlers had built without government authorization in the occupied West Bank. A military spokeswoman said two of the soldiers were immediately sent to prison for 30 days and permanently dismissed from command or combat positions. Several others were still under investigation. The mutiny at an outpost near the West Bank city of Hebron followed a similar incident last month that raised concern about rebellion in the ranks of soldiers opposed on religious or political grounds to any settler evacuation in a future peace deal with Palestinians.
WORLD
April 10, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - Israel's government is scrambling to find ways to save some of the unauthorized West Bank settlements it once promised to dismantle, including some that are built partly on private Palestinian land. The new strategy seeks to retroactively legalize some outposts and, in other cases, relocate Jewish settlers to nearby land that is not privately owned, in effect creating what critics say would be the first new West Bank settlements in years. The approach by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's right-wing coalition government appears designed to avoid the need to carry out high-profile military evictions of settlers in order to appease conservative lawmakers, who have accused Netanyahu of betraying the settlers' cause.
WORLD
December 29, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
For months many Israelis shrugged off the mosque burnings, the uprooted Palestinian olive trees and even the death threats against Jewish leftists. But when young settlers this month vandalized army bases and stoned Israeli soldiers, the question of Jewish terrorism turned into a national emergency. The recent flare-up in settler violence has puzzled many because it comes when there are no peace talks that might lead to land concessions, Palestinian attacks in the West Bank have dropped to new lows, and Israel is led by a conservative government that is expanding settlement construction.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|