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Seve Ballesteros

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2011 | Chuck Culpepper
Seve Ballesteros, the dashing, audacious force of golfing nature who zoomed from a fishing village in northern Spain to five major titles, No. 1 in the world and a pioneer's role in golf's European surge of the 1980s, died early Saturday. He was 54. Ballesteros, who enjoyed such renown for his vivid shot-making that fellow pro Nick Faldo called him "golf's Cirque du Soleil," died of complications from brain cancer at his home in Pedrena, the town where he was born, his family announced on his website.
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SPORTS
July 31, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
LONDON — They don't have an Olympic sport for surfboard biting (yet), but the Great White Shark was in town Tuesday anyway. The subject for Greg Norman was Olympic golf, and if you haven't been paying attention, that phrase may be a stunner. But why not? Olympic Games that used to be a celebration of amateur athletics are now the Dream Team, the NHL in full force, the pro tennis tours and six-figure-income sprinters and swimmers. Why shouldn't golf go with the flow? It's not as if this is a first.
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SPORTS
February 22, 1988 | CURT HOLBREICH, Times Staff Writer
Follow Seve Ballesteros around a course and you see why he might be golf's most intriguing figure. He has more than control of his game; he has command of the event. He strides the fairways briskly ahead of the pack, drawing his caddy, his partners, their caddies, scorers, officials and the scurrying crowd along like a king and his court. He creates the impression that this is his round, if not his game. The truth, as always, is a little more complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2011 | Chuck Culpepper
Seve Ballesteros, the dashing, audacious force of golfing nature who zoomed from a fishing village in northern Spain to five major titles, No. 1 in the world and a pioneer's role in golf's European surge of the 1980s, died early Saturday. He was 54. Ballesteros, who enjoyed such renown for his vivid shot-making that fellow pro Nick Faldo called him "golf's Cirque du Soleil," died of complications from brain cancer at his home in Pedrena, the town where he was born, his family announced on his website.
NEWS
September 25, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You are a king by your own fireside, as much as any monarch in his throne. --Miguel de Cervantes of Don Quixote * If Cervantes were still writing, his hero would be Don Seve, tilting at various European and American PGA tour windmills and taking on the Ryder Cup Committee in his spare time. Seve Ballesteros has been a swashbuckling hero with a keen sense of right and wrong, even if what was right for him was wrong for everyone else.
SPORTS
February 16, 1987 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
Seve Ballesteros has fought authority, and authority has always won. As a boy, he earned money as a caddie--30 cents a round--but he couldn't keep his paws off the players' clubs. One day he picked up a club and started swinging away, something caddies ought not to do. The country club suspended him for a week. So he was angry, he screamed a lot and he pouted. But it did no good. And now it has happened again.
SPORTS
July 31, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
LONDON — They don't have an Olympic sport for surfboard biting (yet), but the Great White Shark was in town Tuesday anyway. The subject for Greg Norman was Olympic golf, and if you haven't been paying attention, that phrase may be a stunner. But why not? Olympic Games that used to be a celebration of amateur athletics are now the Dream Team, the NHL in full force, the pro tennis tours and six-figure-income sprinters and swimmers. Why shouldn't golf go with the flow? It's not as if this is a first.
SPORTS
April 1, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The British Open will return to Royal Lytham and St. Annes in 1996, giving Seve Ballesteros a chance to win the championship three times at the same venue. Harry Vardon was the last to achieve the feat, at Prestwick in 1898, 1903 and 1914.
SPORTS
March 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Magnus Persson of Sweden fired his second straight 7-under-par 65 today and held a one-stroke lead over Seve Ballesteros after two rounds of the Balearics Open golf tournament at Palma de Majorca, Spain. Ballesteros, playing with a 101-degree fever, also shot a 65 for a two-round total of 131.
SPORTS
May 7, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Rafael Nadal wiped away tears shed for Seve Ballesteros after reaching the Madrid Open final, saying his win over Roger Federer was too inconsequential to dedicate to the golf great he describes as a Spanish sporting pioneer. Before his semifinal match against Federer, the top-ranked Nadal watched the video screen showing images of Ballesteros' career. Nadal's eyes welled up and he brushed away tears before the start of the match. Nadal, sporting a black ribbon on his bright yellow shirt in memory of Ballesteros, went on to win, 5-7, 6-1, 6-3, to reach his third straight Madrid final and improve to 11-2 against Federer on clay.
NEWS
September 25, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You are a king by your own fireside, as much as any monarch in his throne. --Miguel de Cervantes of Don Quixote * If Cervantes were still writing, his hero would be Don Seve, tilting at various European and American PGA tour windmills and taking on the Ryder Cup Committee in his spare time. Seve Ballesteros has been a swashbuckling hero with a keen sense of right and wrong, even if what was right for him was wrong for everyone else.
SPORTS
September 19, 1997 | THOMAS BONK
The Ryder Cup doesn't start until next week, but the European team already has a bogey--the way captain Seve Ballesteros booted Miguel Angel Martin. A 35-year-old career scuffler who worked two years to make his first Ryder Cup team on points, Martin deserved to be part of the Valderrama scene. If he was physically unable to play because of his wrist injury, there's no way Martin would have embarrassed himself or his team and played anyway.
SPORTS
September 12, 1997 | From Associated Press
Seve Ballesteros showed fans something they won't see him do at the Ryder Cup when he hit a four-wood 185 yards while on his knees Thursday to finish with a 65 and a tie for the lead at the Lancome Trophy in Saint-Nom-La-Breteche, France. Ballesteros is captain of the European team that will play the United States in Spain in two weeks, but he failed to qualify as a player after his worst season in 23 years as a professional.
SPORTS
September 5, 1997 | THOMAS BONK
That hot breeze that's bending those Ryder Cup flagsticks in Sotogrande, Spain? Yes, it's the familiar breath of controversy, but this time it's coming from a different direction. This time it's Europe's problem. If Curtis Strange was a controversial captain's pick to the U.S. team by Lanny Wadkins in 1995, the way things are going for Seve Ballesteros, there just might be a few new cracks in nearby Gibraltar any day now.
SPORTS
September 22, 1995 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The forecast for the first day of Ryder Cup? Cloudy skies and mild dislike. The flags will be flying, the temperature will be dropping and the rain may be falling today when the 31st Ryder Cup competition opens at Oak Hill Country Club, where golfers from the United States and Europe match each other, shot for shot and attitude for attitude.
SPORTS
June 11, 1994
So Seve Ballesteros thinks he deserves an exemption to (play in) the U.S. Open more than Arnold Palmer. Why? Because of Ballesteros' career-long snubbing of the U.S. tour? Because he won the Sardine Open in Sardinia last week? Because of all he has done for golf in America? Seve, I used to think you had some class. I hope you find every bunker and divot at Oakmont in your two rounds there. Then go home and win another Dutch Open. DUANE PLANK Torrance Golfers such as Seve Ballesteros and the rest of professional golf should be on their knees thanking Arnold Palmer for making the tour as lucrative as it is today.
SPORTS
June 11, 1994
So Seve Ballesteros thinks he deserves an exemption to (play in) the U.S. Open more than Arnold Palmer. Why? Because of Ballesteros' career-long snubbing of the U.S. tour? Because he won the Sardine Open in Sardinia last week? Because of all he has done for golf in America? Seve, I used to think you had some class. I hope you find every bunker and divot at Oakmont in your two rounds there. Then go home and win another Dutch Open. DUANE PLANK Torrance Golfers such as Seve Ballesteros and the rest of professional golf should be on their knees thanking Arnold Palmer for making the tour as lucrative as it is today.
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