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Seven Dwarfs

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OPINION
February 5, 2005
Readers of this page may recall our cynicism at recent reports that SpongeBob SquarePants, who we thought was just a treacly cartoon sponge-person, actually has lurid designs on young children. Last month, James Dobson, Focus on the Family's thoughtmeister, declared that SpongeBob's penchant for holding hands with his male starfish pal and his soft and swishy, er, squishy demeanor signals that he is really a homosexual cartoon sponge.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
March 29, 2014 | By Carren Jao
Fredda Weiss used to tell people visiting her Mandeville Canyon cottage for the first time to watch for the house "that looks like the seven dwarfs live there. " Weiss' 1950s home was warm and inviting - but also a little dark and dated. So after three decades of living in the 2,283-square-foot cottage, Weiss decided to give her storybook home a happy ending. And she had just the architect in mind: Zoltan Pali. "If I was going to do this house, he was going to be my architect," Weiss says.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James Trivers is an eccentric, L.A.-based wit whose books, paintings and prints have, in the past, been wickedly funny, even outrageously original. But his seven muddled pictures at Newspace look overworked and unfinished, with or without the cheap, 3-D glasses you're supposed to wear when viewing them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009 | Noel Murray
Year One Sony, $28.96; Blu-ray, $39.95 Whenever writer-director Harold Ramis' biblical spoof shoots for Mel Brooks-style zaniness, the movie misses badly, but when Ramis leans on his lead actors Jack Black and Michael Cera -- playing hunter-gatherers who leave their tribe and discover civilization -- it becomes much funnier than its reputation. Cera's sardonic "woe is me" attitude balances Black's manic dunderheadedness well, and as the duo encounters Abraham, Cain and Abel and the Sodomites, Ramis brings the same "people are people" heart he brought to such films as "Groundhog Day" and "Analyze This."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2004 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Ever since Walt Disney began turning out feature-length animated films, scholars, theologians and journalists have plumbed the depths of the simple morality tales for deeper religious meanings and messages. Was Snow White's eating of the poison apple an allusion to the Fall in the Garden of Eden? When the puppet maker Geppetto was swallowed by a whale, was that a veiled reference to Jonah in Hebrew Scriptures? Were Jiminy Cricket's initials in "Pinocchio" a hidden reference to Jesus Christ?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1991 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Newlyweds Deny and Christine Staggs like kids. Lots of kids. By summer, they're planning on having, oh, about 1,700 of them. The Staggses are among 10 two-member teams that Missoula (Mont.) Children's Theatre sends on the road each year to schools across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1994 | Donald Liebenson, Donald Liebenson is a Chicago-based free-lance writer
This was the year "Jurassic Park" was snowed in. Steven Spielberg's monster blockbuster may be the biggest box-office hit of all time, but when it came to video, T. rex and the raptors were no match for Doc, Grumpy, Sleepy, Bashful, Happy, Sneezy and Dopey. "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," with its reported 27 million copies sold to retailers and mass merchants, pulled the magic carpet out from under the previous sales champ, Disney's "Aladdin."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009 | Noel Murray
Year One Sony, $28.96; Blu-ray, $39.95 Whenever writer-director Harold Ramis' biblical spoof shoots for Mel Brooks-style zaniness, the movie misses badly, but when Ramis leans on his lead actors Jack Black and Michael Cera -- playing hunter-gatherers who leave their tribe and discover civilization -- it becomes much funnier than its reputation. Cera's sardonic "woe is me" attitude balances Black's manic dunderheadedness well, and as the duo encounters Abraham, Cain and Abel and the Sodomites, Ramis brings the same "people are people" heart he brought to such films as "Groundhog Day" and "Analyze This."
HOME & GARDEN
March 29, 2014 | By Carren Jao
Fredda Weiss used to tell people visiting her Mandeville Canyon cottage for the first time to watch for the house "that looks like the seven dwarfs live there. " Weiss' 1950s home was warm and inviting - but also a little dark and dated. So after three decades of living in the 2,283-square-foot cottage, Weiss decided to give her storybook home a happy ending. And she had just the architect in mind: Zoltan Pali. "If I was going to do this house, he was going to be my architect," Weiss says.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1996 | Peter Green, Peter Green is a freelance writer based in Prague
Five hours of makeup have transformed Sigourney Weaver, the stunning 6-foot heroine of three (and soon to be four) "Alien" films into a snaggle-toothed, hunchbacked, gnarled hag. Layers of finely sculpted dermaplast, the latest thing in fake skin, give her a bald pate with a fringe of long gray hair, while dentures flush out her teeth and her ears would make Alfred E. Neuman jealous. "I'm not disfigured," Weaver protests as a reporter does a double take.
OPINION
February 5, 2005
Readers of this page may recall our cynicism at recent reports that SpongeBob SquarePants, who we thought was just a treacly cartoon sponge-person, actually has lurid designs on young children. Last month, James Dobson, Focus on the Family's thoughtmeister, declared that SpongeBob's penchant for holding hands with his male starfish pal and his soft and swishy, er, squishy demeanor signals that he is really a homosexual cartoon sponge.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1996 | Peter Green, Peter Green is a freelance writer based in Prague
Five hours of makeup have transformed Sigourney Weaver, the stunning 6-foot heroine of three (and soon to be four) "Alien" films into a snaggle-toothed, hunchbacked, gnarled hag. Layers of finely sculpted dermaplast, the latest thing in fake skin, give her a bald pate with a fringe of long gray hair, while dentures flush out her teeth and her ears would make Alfred E. Neuman jealous. "I'm not disfigured," Weaver protests as a reporter does a double take.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James Trivers is an eccentric, L.A.-based wit whose books, paintings and prints have, in the past, been wickedly funny, even outrageously original. But his seven muddled pictures at Newspace look overworked and unfinished, with or without the cheap, 3-D glasses you're supposed to wear when viewing them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1994 | Donald Liebenson, Donald Liebenson is a Chicago-based free-lance writer
This was the year "Jurassic Park" was snowed in. Steven Spielberg's monster blockbuster may be the biggest box-office hit of all time, but when it came to video, T. rex and the raptors were no match for Doc, Grumpy, Sleepy, Bashful, Happy, Sneezy and Dopey. "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs," with its reported 27 million copies sold to retailers and mass merchants, pulled the magic carpet out from under the previous sales champ, Disney's "Aladdin."
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not easy searching for the perfect wave in the middle of a forest. But the seven dwarfs have spent their lives doing just that. Until one day, a princess, who is on the lam from a queen who's trying to have her killed, comes into their lives . . . well, you probably know the rest. So do the producers of the Moorpark Melodrama, who are presenting "Snow White and the Seven Surfin' Dwarfs," a lively twist on the old tale.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1991 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Newlyweds Deny and Christine Staggs like kids. Lots of kids. By summer, they're planning on having, oh, about 1,700 of them. The Staggses are among 10 two-member teams that Missoula (Mont.) Children's Theatre sends on the road each year to schools across the country.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1987 | JOHN TIGHE, Times Staff Writer
Opening day of the Sneezy sale was a madhouse. By 11 a.m., the sales board was filled with scribbled numbers, dealers had tied up phone lines trying to place orders and those who did get through had gobbled up $1.5 million worth of the silver medallions. By day's end, orders had been placed for $2.5 million worth of the Rarities Mint "Sneezy," the fifth in a series of 11 medallions based on the key characters in Walt Disney's classic, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs."
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not easy searching for the perfect wave in the middle of a forest. But the seven dwarfs have spent their lives doing just that. Until one day, a princess, who is on the lam from a queen who's trying to have her killed, comes into their lives . . . well, you probably know the rest. So do the producers of the Moorpark Melodrama, who are presenting "Snow White and the Seven Surfin' Dwarfs," a lively twist on the old tale.
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