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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2005 | Susan King
The Controversial Classics Collection Warner Home Video, $20 each; $80 for the set Warner is advertising this tantalizing DVD collection as "Seven Reel Revolutionaries that Brought About Real Reform." Spanning 1932 to 1964, the seven classic movies explore such hot-button topics of their time as prison abuse, lynching, prejudice, juvenile delinquency, homosexuality and the folly of war.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2005 | Susan King
The Controversial Classics Collection Warner Home Video, $20 each; $80 for the set Warner is advertising this tantalizing DVD collection as "Seven Reel Revolutionaries that Brought About Real Reform." Spanning 1932 to 1964, the seven classic movies explore such hot-button topics of their time as prison abuse, lynching, prejudice, juvenile delinquency, homosexuality and the folly of war.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 1985
Walt Disney Productions sold pay-TV rights to "Splash," "Country," "Tex," "Trenchcoat," "Something Wicked This Way Comes," "Midnight Madness" and "Running Brave" to Home Box Office and Showtime, two competing pay-cable services. Disney Vice President Erwin Okun confirmed the sale but declined to disclose the terms. The sale appears to be Disney's first sale of a group of films since the 1983 launch of its own pay-TV service, the Disney Channel.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1985
Walt Disney Productions sold pay-TV rights to "Splash," "Country," "Tex," "Trenchcoat," "Something Wicked This Way Comes," "Midnight Madness" and "Running Brave" to Home Box Office and Showtime, two competing pay-cable services. Disney Vice President Erwin Okun confirmed the sale but declined to disclose the terms. The sale appears to be Disney's first sale of a group of films since the 1983 launch of its own pay-TV service, the Disney Channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2003 | Lee Margulies
Jack Valenti, who has run the Motion Picture Assn. of America since 1966, says he has no plans to retire but has nonetheless started conversations with the studios that employ him about finding a successor. "I told them that I didn't have a date in mind on which I was going to leave but I think it's wise -- every corporate chieftain wants to have some kind of plan in place for succession," Valenti, 80, told the Washington Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Indian film industry, which claims to be the world's biggest, is on the brink of financial disaster, with videotapes and television largely the culprits. Santosh Jain, president of the Film Distributors Council, says only 17 of 126 films released last year made money for their investors. Seven movie theaters have closed in Bombay alone this year. India's film output has been falling since a 1985 peak of 912 movies. It sank to 773 in 1988 and is expected to continue dropping.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2002 | P.J. Huffstutter
Marking a big step to shift movies from celluloid to digital, the Digital Cinema Initiatives named the Entertainment Technology Center at USC as its lab of choice and announced that it would begin testing in January technologies needed to deliver movies to theaters electronically.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1998
The City Council voted 4 to 2 to correct errors in a key report on orders from a judge reviewing a challenge to the construction of a shopping and movie complex on South Lake Avenue. Council members took the action after Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Robert O'Brien, while hearing a lawsuit challenging the project, ordered the council to clarify language in an environmental impact report.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2004 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Pixar Animation Studios got great reviews from movie critics for its newest release, "The Incredibles." But the company was perhaps even more pleased by the word on Wall Street: Buy. Shares of the Emeryville, Calif., studio hit a record high Friday, rising $3.59 to $84.45 on the New York Stock Exchange.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1994 | CLAUDIA ELLER and ELAINE DUTKA
Hollywood's executive suites are designed with a revolving door. A studio head, on average, has a three-year life span on the job, and sometimes only half that time. Since 1991, six of the eight major studios--all but Warner Bros. and Universal Pictures--have suffered major shake ups in their top managerial ranks. This fall, the industry has seen back-to-back departures by two of its highest-profile players: Sony's Peter Guber and Disney's Jeffrey Katzenberg.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County moviegoers will find a variety of alternatives to first-run, blockbuster movies this weekend. There's even a chance to mark that film calendar for the remainder of the year: * Saturday, Classic Cinema night at Thousand Oaks Library will feature the 1952 film "Cry, the Beloved Country," starring Sidney Poitier, Canada Lee and Charles Carson. The movie, based on the novel by Alan Paton, was the first major motion picture to focus on South African apartheid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1998
Fearing that a City Council hearing on a proposal to build shops and a movie theater on South Lake Avenue will draw an overflow crowd, the city is investigating whether to take some testimony on the plan by telephone. Mayor Chris Holden came up with the idea, saying that such testimony would be conveyed to council members before they make a decision on the project.
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