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Seven Wonders Of The World

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NEWS
May 30, 1995
1. The Pyramids of Egypt Location: Giza, Egypt Date: 2800 BC Builder: Khufu, the king of the 4th Dynasty. Description and dimensions: There are three pyramids (Khufu, Khafre and Menkure, all named for their builders), the largest of which, Khufu, stands 450 feet tall with a base measuring 755 feet on each side. The pyramids contain 2.3 million limestone blocks, each of which weigh 2.5 tons.
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WORLD
July 8, 2007 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
The world's most wondrous wonder is actually the computer. Millions of people from across the globe joined in what was essentially a huge publicity stunt, voting via the Internet to choose a new list of the Seven Wonders of the World, announced Saturday.
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TRAVEL
March 10, 1996 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
More than two millennia before David Letterman started churning out top 10 lists, a Greek historian named Antipater popularized the world's most famous top seven list: The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, compiled in 240 BC. But six of the seven were lost or destroyed centuries ago--the pyramids of Egypt are the only holdovers--and ever since, travelers, architects, engineers and others have been arguing over which landmarks deserve to be considered modern world wonders. The Eiffel Tower?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | James Janega, Chicago Tribune
In a way, the structures were just waiting for this. They passed centuries in glorious esteem, sheltering kings from time to time, inspiring postcard photographers. Think of the vaguely disquieting statues at Easter Island, the luminous marble of the Taj Mahal, the stately Athenian Acropolis and the intimidatingly vast Great Wall of China. They're beyond landmarks. Many are official World Heritage Sites, recognized both as lovely and significant by the United Nations.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2006 | James Janega, Chicago Tribune
In a way, the structures were just waiting for this. They passed centuries in glorious esteem, sheltering kings from time to time, inspiring postcard photographers. Think of the vaguely disquieting statues at Easter Island, the luminous marble of the Taj Mahal, the stately Athenian Acropolis and the intimidatingly vast Great Wall of China. They're beyond landmarks. Many are official World Heritage Sites, recognized both as lovely and significant by the United Nations.
BOOKS
August 19, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
The concept of a list of places that everyone must visit dates back to the 5th Century BC and the "Histories" of Herodotus.
OPINION
July 11, 2007
Re "The Seven Wonders of the World, 2.0," July 8 With the new "Seven Wonders of the World," there is nothing represented in North America. The No. 1 item is the Great Wall of China. It is 4,000 miles long. May I suggest the "Great Wall of North America." It would be more than 700 miles along the U.S.-Mexican border. It could be the eighth wonder of the world. SCOTT BRYANT Lake Forest
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | DAVE JOHNSON
--You've heard of the seven seas and the Seven Wonders of the World, so why not the seven underwater wonders of the world. A panel of 14 marine scientists, conservationists and explorers named the sites to draw attention to the underwater environment and to urge a global effort to protect it. Former astronaut Scott Carpenter, now an environmental consultant, said: "We're killing the oceans . . . . The ocean is a very delicate entity and people don't realize that."
OPINION
December 21, 2008
Re "Sweeping view of the past," Dec. 14 I was saddened to read about Babylon and wondered how could the different governments of Iraq over the course of their existence been so ignorant and nonchalant in failing to preserve one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. I wish a powerful entity could be created to protect and restore historic sites in Third World countries before they are completely obliterated and fall into eternal oblivion. After all, the hanging gardens of Babylon do not belong to Iraq only -- they belong to the world.
NEWS
May 30, 1995
1. The Pyramids of Egypt Location: Giza, Egypt Date: 2800 BC Builder: Khufu, the king of the 4th Dynasty. Description and dimensions: There are three pyramids (Khufu, Khafre and Menkure, all named for their builders), the largest of which, Khufu, stands 450 feet tall with a base measuring 755 feet on each side. The pyramids contain 2.3 million limestone blocks, each of which weigh 2.5 tons.
BOOKS
August 19, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
The concept of a list of places that everyone must visit dates back to the 5th Century BC and the "Histories" of Herodotus.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Saddam Hussein has offered $1.5 million to any Iraqi who can solve a 3,000-year-old puzzle--how King Nebuchadnezzar managed to water the fabled Hanging Gardens of Babylon. Archeologists are divided over whether the gardens--said to have graced terraces hundreds of feet above the palm-fringed Euphrates River--existed. The gardens reputedly were built by Nebuchadnezzar in the 6th Century BC to enchant his homesick queen, the Median princess Amytis.
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