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Seventh Day Adventist Church

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November 27, 1988 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, Times Religion Writer
It is only a 4-foot-by-8-foot sheet of plywood with hand-painted lettering on a rainbow background. The board hangs in Kona, Hawaii, outside a small rented hall where a few souls quietly worship God each Saturday morning. But the sign contains a forbidden name, and a legal battle over its use has stirred a tsunami of church reaction on the mainland. The case is now pending in the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco. "What we are faced with is a Goliath vs.
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FOOD
April 2, 2010 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Spring is prime season not only for asparagus, favas and strawberries, but for new farmers markets, which often open at this time in the hope of gaining traction before the peak of sales in summer. One of the first of this year's new crop is the Wellington Square farmers market, located in the parking lot of its sponsor, the Smyrna Seventh-Day Adventist church, in the Mid-City district. Although there are other markets not too far away, including two, FAME and Adams and Vermont, that also are sponsored by churches, Lora Davis, a resident of the Wellington Square neighborhood, longed for a more local market, and decided to open one herself.
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NEWS
August 13, 1998 | TOM GORMAN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the beginning, there was disappointment--the Great Disappointment, as the faithful of the Seventh-day Adventist Church would come to call it. It happened on a brilliant Maine day in the fall of 1844. A sickly teenage prophetess named Ellen G. White, the church's scriptural architect, waited with her brethren for Jesus Christ's predicted return. When he failed to materialize, White urged her disheartened followers to cherish the surety that such a day indeed would dawn.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
About 70,000 Seventh-day Adventist members meeting in St. Louis for the church's worldwide conference elevated a woman to a top leadership post for the first time. Ella Louise Smith Simmons, 57, will serve as one of nine vice presidents. "The church as an organization cannot be efficient until it allows all people to contribute in ways that God calls them to contribute," she said. "The church is taking a step in the right direction."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1994 | From Religious News Service
More than a century and a half ago, Mormon Church founder Joseph Smith said God warned him that tobacco was harmful to human beings. Smith's 1833 revelation--in which alcohol, tea and coffee were also denounced--surprised many followers, some of whom tried unsuccessfully to give up tobacco when they were told it was against God's will. But the legacy of Smith exerts a profound influence. The Mormon Church is in the forefront of an aggressive campaign to educate against tobacco use.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The international head of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, dogged by questions about his financial ties to a Sacramento investor, resigned his post Monday after nearly a decade at the top of the 10-million-member church. Robert S. Folkenberg, the son of missionary parents and president of the fast-growing denomination since 1990, told associates that the controversy over his financial dealings was "detracting from God's work."
NEWS
June 18, 1996 | Reuters
A church in a racially mixed New York community was defaced with a swastika and the initials "KKK" were burned into the front lawn with chemicals, police said Monday. A New York police spokeswoman said the markings at the Mt. Sinai Seventh Day Adventist Church in Queens Village were made last week.
NEWS
August 8, 1986
The United States issued a formal protest to Romania over the razing of a church and a synagogue in Bucharest, Assistant Secretary of State Rozanne L. Ridgway told a House Foreign Affairs subcommittee. Romania's largest Seventh-day Adventist church was demolished just two weeks after the last Sephardic synagogue in Bucharest was destroyed, Ridgway said. Both were razed to make way for an urban renewal project.
NEWS
February 16, 1987
A San Bernardino woman, Beth Arriaga, 21, has filed a $10-million lawsuit against Loma Linda University, claiming that she was improperly fired from her job as a library technician for the Seventh-day Adventist institution for getting pregnant. Arriaga, a member of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, became pregnant in February, 1986, was fired in July and remains unmarried after having had a child last November.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A small plane carrying Seventh-day Adventist Church officials crashed soon after taking off from an airport in a rural, mountainous area, killing five of the six people on board. The only survivor, co-pilot Jim Huff, walked away from the crash site and was taken to a Chattanooga hospital, Sheriff John Cupp said. The twin-engine Cessna 421 crashed, caught fire and broke apart in a thicket of trees about 1 1/2 miles north of the Collegedale Municipal Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Seventh-day Adventist Church has agreed to pay $3.5 million and alter its policies to settle lawsuits filed by five men who said they were molested by teachers when they were students at a church boarding school. A spokesman for the Central California Conference of the Adventist Church said the church was "deeply saddened" by the lawsuit allegations and hoped the settlements would "bring closure for those involved."
NATIONAL
December 3, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A small plane carrying Seventh-day Adventist Church officials crashed soon after taking off from an airport in a rural, mountainous area, killing five of the six people on board. The only survivor, co-pilot Jim Huff, walked away from the crash site and was taken to a Chattanooga hospital, Sheriff John Cupp said. The twin-engine Cessna 421 crashed, caught fire and broke apart in a thicket of trees about 1 1/2 miles north of the Collegedale Municipal Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1999 | Associated Press
The Rev. Jan Paulsen has been elected president of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Paulsen, vice president since 1995, is a native of Norway and is the first European to lead the denomination, which has 9.7 million members worldwide and 876,000 in North America. Paulsen succeeds the Rev. Robert Folkenberg, 58, president since 1990, who submitted his resignation in February.
NEWS
February 9, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The international head of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, dogged by questions about his financial ties to a Sacramento investor, resigned his post Monday after nearly a decade at the top of the 10-million-member church. Robert S. Folkenberg, the son of missionary parents and president of the fast-growing denomination since 1990, told associates that the controversy over his financial dealings was "detracting from God's work."
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World leaders of the Seventh-day Adventist Church ended three days of tense emergency meetings Wednesday without deciding whether the church's president should be disciplined over allegations of financial and ethical misconduct. Instead, 40 senior leaders of the 10-million-member church, who came from as far as Korea and Australia, voted to pass the question of President Robert S. Folkenberg's future to the executive committee of the church's ruling body for consideration in March.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventh-day Adventist leaders from around the world are flying into town this weekend for an emergency meeting to discuss the fate of the 10-million-member church's president, accused of ethical and financial misdeeds in dealings with a Sacramento businessman who is suing him. Some elders are already demanding that President Robert H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1992 | PSYCHE PASCUAL
The Ventura County Fire Department may bill a Seventh-Day Adventist church for the costs of fighting a brush fire in Newbury Park earlier this week, an investigator said Thursday. Flames from the ignitions of model rockets were to blame for the brush fire Monday that scorched 35 acres of land owned by the Newbury Park Adventist Academy, fire officials said. It took about 140 county firefighters 1 1/2 hours to put out the blaze.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | AARON BETSKY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Aaron Betsky teaches and writes about architecture
Hollywood was founded by temperance-minded religious pioneers who dreamed of a city of churches, not saloons. Ironically, it became the sin center of Los Angeles, filled with worldly entertainment ranging from raunchy sex to rock 'n' roll. There are only a few churches left, and those that exist must adapt themselves to a hostile environment. A case in point is the Seventh-day Adventist Church at Hollywood Boulevard and Van Ness Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1998 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he chugs caffeine at a Westside cafe, Barry Taylor's spiky shock of unruly red hair sprouts as though groomed by a drunken comb. It's nearly noon but his eyelids still have that up-all-night droop. His fingernails are painted a dullish gray. Hoops hang from his earlobes; bracelets dangle from both wrists. "I don't much look like a guy who runs his own church, do I?" he asks in the lilting accent of his native England. No, he doesn't.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | Religion News Service
The Seventh-day Adventist Church has launched a World Wide Web page that allows people to calculate precise sunrise and sunset times for any place in the world for any date. "The sunset calculator provides an easy user interface for anyone to access sunrise and sunset times for any given day and for any given spot on the globe," said Jonathan Gallagher, news director at the denomination's headquarters in Silver Spring, Md.
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