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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2007 | Susan King
The British-born director Christopher Smith was obsessed with horror films when he was a lad. He acquired his first taste for the genre watching vintage B-movie fare from Hammer Film Productions on television. By the time he reached 12, Smith had graduated to grislier offerings, such as "I Spit on Your Grave." Too young to rent such movies, Smith would smuggle them out of his local video store inside copies of more kid-friendly fare like "Raiders of the Lost Ark."
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December 16, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
As the year winds down, multiplexes fill up with films vying for award-season consideration. Thanks to a bumper crop of period movies, late 2012 has showcased some serious talent in the field of costume design. Some of the films are worth watching for wardrobe alone while others serve up but a handful of standout screen-style moments. But whether it's Lincoln's stovepipe hat or Janet Leigh's curve-hugging dress, the costumes here have one thing in common: They help advance the story without hijacking it. 'Anna Karenina' Costume designer Jacqueline Durran mixes 1870s period details with elements of 1950s haute couture to create the resplendent, bustle-back gowns worn by Keira Knightley in this adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's novel, staged on a theater set. The luxurious velvets, feathers and furs, hats and veils inspired an Anna Karenina for Banana Republic collection.
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NEWS
December 5, 1991 | GREGG BARRIOS
The most important Latino-theme film to be released by Hollywood this winter is Warner Bros.' "The Mambo Kings." The story follows two Cuban musician brothers, played by Armand Assante and Antonio Banderas, who arrive in New York City during the 1950s mambo craze. They bring their own songs and dreams of love and fame. In one key scene, they appear on the "I Love Lucy" TV show.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2011 | By Gina McIntyre, Los Angeles Times
Like one of the mysterious creatures that populate his fantastical films, Guillermo del Toro possesses a unique ability to be everywhere and nowhere at the same time. On Sunday, the filmmaker will premiere the new horror film he co-wrote and produced, "Don't Be Afraid of the Dark," two months before its Aug. 26 theatrical opening as part of the closing night festivities for the Los Angeles Film Festival, which tapped Del Toro as this year's guest director. But the update of the 1973 telefilm that he calls "the scariest movie I saw as a kid," marks the first time in three years that a project with Del Toro's beautifully macabre aesthetic has appeared on the big screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
VENICE, Italy -- Venice Film Festival Director Marco Mueller likens the 75-year-old festival to a seismograph that picks up emerging cinematic trends. If his instincts are right, the film world is about to be jolted by a movement focusing on atonement. The film adaptation of Ian McEwan's bestseller "Atonement" by director Joe Wright turned out to be a fitting headliner for the festival, which, running Wednesday through Sept. 8, also showcases two films that deal with the Iraq war's impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Empire," which debuts Tuesday on ABC with the customary "two-hour special" and runs its course in hour-long installments over the following four weeks, is a perfect summer entertainment, a melodrama of ancient Rome with not much on its mind but the flash of swords and of skin.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2007 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Jeff Clanagan wants to ride Tyler Perry's coattails. So does 20th Century Fox. They are pairing up to make several Gospel-inspired films that are much like the ones that have made Perry a sensation. Perry, a 37-year-old producer, writer, director and star, has shown Hollywood the gold to be mined from Gospel-infused entertainment. Fox and Clanagan are pinning their initial hopes on a movie version of the popular play "Mama I Want to Sing."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
It's Day 4 of rehearsals for "Wrong Turn at Lungfish" at the Falcon Theatre, and the actors are still finding their way around each other, the props and the play itself. "It's all choreography," says Hector Elizondo, garbed in blue pajamas as he climbs into a hospital bed. He's playing an intellectual former college dean, a widower who has suddenly gone blind. A young woman, Anita (Ana Ortiz), is brought in to read to him at his nursing home.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today marks the 80th birthday of one of Hollywood's brightest stars: Gregory Peck. The La Jolla-born Peck made his film debut in 1944's "Days of Glory," won the best actor Oscar for 1962's "To Kill a Mockingbird" and was recipient of the 1989 AFI Life Achievement Award. What better away to celebrate his birthday than with a bushel of great Peck videos?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2002 | STEPHEN FARBER
Many great writers have dramatized the profound misunderstandings that so often sabotage honest communication. In his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "American Pastoral," Philip Roth mused about our futile interactions with other people: "You get them wrong before you meet them, while you're anticipating meeting them; you get them wrong while you're with them; and then you go home to tell somebody else about the meeting and you get them all wrong again.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Oversexed, underfed, overgrown adolescents. That's how Diego Luna and Gael Garcia Bernal appeared when they hit the road together in "Y Tu Mama Tambien," the 2002 coming-of-age story that gave the young Mexican actors a following in global cinema and remains possibly their best-known work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2009 | Jon Thurber
Charles H. Schneer, a film producer best known for his influential collaboration on several movies with special effects genius Ray Harryhausen, has died. He was 88. Schneer died Wednesday at a hospice in Boca Raton, Fla., according to his daughter Stacey Schneer Lee. Schneer, who most recently had been living in Delray Beach, Fla., had been ill for several years, his daughter said in a news release.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
VENICE, Italy -- Venice Film Festival Director Marco Mueller likens the 75-year-old festival to a seismograph that picks up emerging cinematic trends. If his instincts are right, the film world is about to be jolted by a movement focusing on atonement. The film adaptation of Ian McEwan's bestseller "Atonement" by director Joe Wright turned out to be a fitting headliner for the festival, which, running Wednesday through Sept. 8, also showcases two films that deal with the Iraq war's impact.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2007 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Jeff Clanagan wants to ride Tyler Perry's coattails. So does 20th Century Fox. They are pairing up to make several Gospel-inspired films that are much like the ones that have made Perry a sensation. Perry, a 37-year-old producer, writer, director and star, has shown Hollywood the gold to be mined from Gospel-infused entertainment. Fox and Clanagan are pinning their initial hopes on a movie version of the popular play "Mama I Want to Sing."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2007 | Susan King
The British-born director Christopher Smith was obsessed with horror films when he was a lad. He acquired his first taste for the genre watching vintage B-movie fare from Hammer Film Productions on television. By the time he reached 12, Smith had graduated to grislier offerings, such as "I Spit on Your Grave." Too young to rent such movies, Smith would smuggle them out of his local video store inside copies of more kid-friendly fare like "Raiders of the Lost Ark."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Empire," which debuts Tuesday on ABC with the customary "two-hour special" and runs its course in hour-long installments over the following four weeks, is a perfect summer entertainment, a melodrama of ancient Rome with not much on its mind but the flash of swords and of skin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2009 | Jon Thurber
Charles H. Schneer, a film producer best known for his influential collaboration on several movies with special effects genius Ray Harryhausen, has died. He was 88. Schneer died Wednesday at a hospice in Boca Raton, Fla., according to his daughter Stacey Schneer Lee. Schneer, who most recently had been living in Delray Beach, Fla., had been ill for several years, his daughter said in a news release.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2009 | Reed Johnson
Oversexed, underfed, overgrown adolescents. That's how Diego Luna and Gael Garcia Bernal appeared when they hit the road together in "Y Tu Mama Tambien," the 2002 coming-of-age story that gave the young Mexican actors a following in global cinema and remains possibly their best-known work.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
It's Day 4 of rehearsals for "Wrong Turn at Lungfish" at the Falcon Theatre, and the actors are still finding their way around each other, the props and the play itself. "It's all choreography," says Hector Elizondo, garbed in blue pajamas as he climbs into a hospital bed. He's playing an intellectual former college dean, a widower who has suddenly gone blind. A young woman, Anita (Ana Ortiz), is brought in to read to him at his nursing home.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2002 | ANDRE CHAUTARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here's to you Mrs. Robinson: With the number of films coming out this summer in which an older woman gets involved with a very young or even teenage guy, it's starting to look more like the "Summer of '42" than the summer of '02. In "Tadpole," which is to open July 19, a 15-year-old boarding school student (newcomer Aaron Stanford) becomes infatuated with his stepmother, played by Sigourney Weaver.
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