Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSeverino Antinori
IN THE NEWS

Severino Antinori

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Moves to outlaw pregnancies for older women were debated after an outcry over the work of Dr. Severino Antinori. The storm initially broke in Britain after a 59-year-old businesswoman gave birth to twins after artificial fertilization at Antinori's Rome clinic. Antinori subsequently revealed that an Italian, Rossana Dalla Corte, who will be 63 in February, is pregnant.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
December 27, 1993 | From Reuters
A 59-year-old Briton has become the oldest woman on record to have twins after giving birth to test-tube babies on Christmas Day, a British newspaper reported today. The woman, who was not named, was given fertility treatment by controversial Italian doctor Severino Antinori and had her babies by Cesarean section in a London clinic Saturday, the Sun said. The case caused a fierce controversy about post-menopausal mothers when it first became public in July, midway through the woman's pregnancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2001
The maverick scientists who this week announced imminent plans to clone people are trying to fob off the technique as merely the latest breakthrough in infertility treatment. There is, however, no comparison between cloning and earlier reproductive technologies like in vitro fertilization. Cloning has been performed on hundreds of mice, cows, goats and pigs since Dolly the cloned lamb's pioneering birth in 1997.
OPINION
April 11, 2002
There is almost no support for so-called "reproductive cloning''--the morally repugnant notion of copying DNA for the purpose of creating a child. But what about creating a few human cells that might cure Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, cancer or other serious diseases, without creating a fetus? That use, though it requires examination, certainly does not fall in the same class as baby-making.
NEWS
April 7, 2002 | From Reuters
Scientists reacted with skepticism and shock on Saturday to a report that a woman taking part in a controversial human cloning program for infertile couples was eight weeks pregnant. Italian fertility specialist Severino Antinori, who last year announced his intention to create the world's first human clone, has been quoted as saying one woman in his program is pregnant--but he has since refused to confirm or deny it. "Our project is at a very advanced stage.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | FRANCES D'EMILIO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rosanna Della Corte divides her affection between "big" Riccardo and "little" Riccardo. The first is the teenager who died six years ago; the second is her other son, the one she gave birth to when she was 62 and desperate for a reason to keep on living. The sticky air and suffocating heat of these recent days remind her of both sons. "It was just like this when I was resting in bed, waiting to give birth to Riccardo," says Della Corte, who is now 65.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2001 | MADISON SHOCKLEY, Madison Shockley, a writer in residence at USC's Annenberg School for Communication, is a minister of the United Church of Christ and a member of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice in Washington, D.C
Tuesday in Washington, two doctors announced to the National Academy of Sciences that they are proceeding--somewhere outside the United States--to clone human beings for the benefit of infertile couples, some of whom live in the U.S. I can't imagine a more humiliating segue than to make such an announcement less than a week after the House voted to make cloning illegal in the U.S. But if we ever needed a reminder of the impotence of ignorance in the face of progress, Drs.
OPINION
June 2, 2002 | JUDITH F. DAAR, Judith F. Daar is a professor of law at Whittier Law School.
President Bush recently reinvigorated the debate about human cloning, warning in a Rose Garden speech that "allowing cloning would be taking a significant step toward a society in which human beings are grown for spare body parts, and children are engineered to custom specifications."
NEWS
August 7, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Italian doctor and a U.S. researcher claim they will implant cloned human embryos in 200 female volunteers within the next few months, an effort that would mark the first known attempt at human cloning, and which is sure to complicate an already tangled debate in Congress over the procedure.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The British government moved Thursday to ease public fears about new gene technologies by announcing plans to outlaw human reproductive cloning and steps to prevent insurance companies from using genetic tests to limit coverage. At the same time, genetic tests for diseases such as breast cancer are to be made more readily available through the National Health Service.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|