Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSevero Perez
IN THE NEWS

Severo Perez

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1994 | GREGG BARRIOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Severo Perez, an independent Chicano filmmaker and writer, is about to see his dream of a lifetime come true. His feature film " . . . and the earth did not swallow him" is set to premiere Saturday at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival. The film is based on the 1971 semi-autobiographical novel ". . . y no se lo trago la tierra," by the late Tomas Rivera, the Chicano writer who was chancellor of the University of California at Riverside when he died in 1984.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Two months shy of his 75th birthday, postmodern icon Rudy Perez may be losing his eyesight but not his vision. In a program commemorating Sept. 11 on Saturday at Pasadena's Armory Center for the Arts, Perez again proved that his is a choreographic voice that continues to resonate. Nowhere was this more evident than in his 1982 work, "It Should Go Unsaid," set to Gavin Bryars' score, "Jesus' Blood Never Found Me."
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Two months shy of his 75th birthday, postmodern icon Rudy Perez may be losing his eyesight but not his vision. In a program commemorating Sept. 11 on Saturday at Pasadena's Armory Center for the Arts, Perez again proved that his is a choreographic voice that continues to resonate. Nowhere was this more evident than in his 1982 work, "It Should Go Unsaid," set to Gavin Bryars' score, "Jesus' Blood Never Found Me."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1994 | GREGG BARRIOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Severo Perez, an independent Chicano filmmaker and writer, is about to see his dream of a lifetime come true. His feature film " . . . and the earth did not swallow him" is set to premiere Saturday at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival. The film is based on the 1971 semi-autobiographical novel ". . . y no se lo trago la tierra," by the late Tomas Rivera, the Chicano writer who was chancellor of the University of California at Riverside when he died in 1984.
NEWS
June 2, 1996 | Kevin Thomas
Severo Perez's 1994 film of Tomas Rivera's classic Chicano novel is as sincere and earnest as the Mexican American family it depicts with such love and respect. Set in the early '50s with an impeccable sense of time and place, it is an epic story of survival in which family, communal life and the church are the source of all things inspirational. With Daniel Valdez, center. (KCET Wednesday at 9 p.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Severo Perez's film of Tomas Rivera's " . . . and the earth did not swallow him" is as sincere and earnest as the Mexican American family it depicts with such love and respect. Although the film, which is based on a classic Chicano novel, could use more of a sense of style and pace, it is nevertheless an affecting experience, beautifully photographed and illuminating the hard lives of a small Texas community of migrant farm workers who regularly follow the harvest to Minnesota.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1991 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Adolescents making choices is the theme of "Between Friends," a forthright educational drama about AIDS prevention airing Sunday at 5:30 p.m. on KCET Channel 28. Written and directed by Severo Perez and produced by the San Francisco Department of Public Health for Latino junior high school youth, the half-hour drama is a survival tool, accessible to teens of any background.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1988 | GREGG BARRIOS
"Romero" isn't the only attempt by Catholic Church-sponsored media to reach the Latino community. Franciscan Communications, the media arm of the Franciscan Order, recently premiered "Yolanda: De Nuevo" (A New Beginning), a modest 30-minute program made for television and a possible series pilot. Despite about 40 years of programs like "The Hour of Saint Francis," this is the Franciscan's first film directed especially to Latino Catholics.
NEWS
November 18, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf
On the cusp of turning 75, postmodern dance icon Rudy Perez is not only alive and kicking -- thank you very much -- but still making relevant work. One of the co-founders of New York's seminal Judson Dance Theatre in 1962, Perez nearly 30 years ago moved to Los Angeles, where he continues to blaze trails despite failing eyesight. Celebrating Perez and his work, MOCA Grand Avenue is hosting the world premiere screening of "Countdown: Reflections on a Life in Dance."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1997
Tony Award winner and Grammy nominee Melba Moore will be joined by half a dozen Broadway actors and a pair of grand pianos as she celebrates the music of the great Cole Porter in the opening concert of the Orange County Performing Arts Center Broadway Revue series. * The Cole Porter Songbook With Melba Moore, Founders Hall, Orange County Performing Arts Center, 600 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. $42. Also Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday 2 p.m. (714) 556-2787.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1987 | VICTOR VALLE, Times Staff Writer
Although denying that it was bowing to community pressure, Plaza de la Raza's board of directors has voted in emergency session to convene a meeting of its general membership within 60 days. The board's vote came in the wake of picketing last week by a group of Latino parents and artists who were protesting the dismissal of two Plaza de la Raza employees and expressing their dissatisfaction with the way the cultural center is being run.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Espejos: The Search for an Experimental Identity," a program of Chicano experimental films, screens tonight at 8 at LACE as part of Filmforum's contribution to the citywide Artes de Mexico celebration.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|