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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1986
This letter is in regard to the attempt of the City of Escondido and the County of San Diego to lower the way they treat the 13 million to 15 million gallons of sewage whose outfall is off Cardiff State Beach. We are retired. Although we don't use the ocean as much as we used to, we do enjoy walking on the beach and being part of this beach community. When we found out that the proposed treatment (advanced primary) doesn't rid the sewage of the virus and bacteria (as secondary does)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Crews working overnight were able to repair a 40-year-old steel-and-concrete pipe that burst in Guerneville, north of the Bay Area, sending 100,000 gallons or more of sewage into the Russian River. Officials say it is the biggest sewage spill into the Northern California river in at least a decade. About 40,000 gallons of sewage per hour generally flows through the 16-inch pipe, officials said. The leak near Branch and Orchard avenues started at about 12:30 p.m. Thursday and lasted about three hours.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1989
For years, regulatory agencies and the courts have prodded the city of Los Angeles toward full secondary treatment of the sewage it dumps into Santa Monica Bay. As a result, the city has a massive sewage disposal modernization program under way and will achieve full secondary treatment of its effluent by 1998. Now, the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County are fighting the same losing battle that the city waged for so long. The districts have been seeking from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency a waiver--the sort the city has worked under--to exempt about half its effluent from the secondary treatment level required by the Clean Water Act. The county districts have used a two-pronged argument in seeking partial exemption from the federal law. They claim that it would be more effective to work for source reduction--to get industry and other sewage customers to keep toxic metals and other harmful effluent material from getting into the sewage system in the first place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
Orange County health officials Wednesday closed portions of Huntington Harbour to swimmers and divers because of a sewage spill. The closures were issued for the south and west portions of the Huntington Beach community from Wayfare Lane to Warner Avenue, which includes the Humboldt and Davenport beaches. Officials said about 800 gallons of sewage spilled into the channel on New Year's Day from a storm drain on Heil Avenue and Algonquin Street.    ALSO: Jahi McMath's family battles hospital over brain-dead girl 'Sunrise at the Oasis' wins Sweepstakes prize at Rose Parade Same-sex wedding occurs without incident on Rose Parade float     Twitter: @latvives ruben.vives@latimes.com
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1987
After reading (Jan. 13) about how the Environmental Protection Agency is in cahoots with the Justice Department, the City of Los Angeles, and state water officials in allowing continued sewage dumping in Santa Monica Bay, I joined the Sierra Club. Now I'd like to propose a more fitting name for the Environmental Protection Agency: the BMPA--Big Money Protection Agency. KAREN SANDERS Santa Monica
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | Associated Press
A jury found Amtrak guilty Thursday of dumping raw sewage into Florida waterways in the national rail passenger line's first such criminal trial. The state filed charges of commercial littering after Amtrak refused to stop dumping raw human wastes from moving trains onto the tracks and into the St. Johns River and Rice Creek. Amtrak contended that federal law exempts it from state pollution control laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001
People who want a clean ocean and beaches in Orange County should note that their sewage is being dumped into the ocean via a 301(h) waiver that allows the Orange County Sanitation District to discharge only partially treated sewage into the ocean. According to the federal Clean Water Act, all sewage should receive secondary treatment that removes most of the solids, bacteria and viruses from what gets flushed down the toilet. The waiver, however, permits the Sanitation District to only treat half of the sewage to this level.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Members of five households are expected to return home today after city workers finish removing the raw sewage that inundated their homes last weekend. Julie Gutierrez, director of the Department of Public Works, said the residents were evacuated and placed in hotels after the sewer line backed up. The single-family house and four-unit complex are near Hill Avenue and Howard Street.
NEWS
July 19, 1987
Despite the release of 6.2 million gallons of treated sewage into the ocean a mile from shore, beachgoers--more than 75,000 strong--came to Los Angeles County beaches and were allowed to go into the water Saturday after preliminary test results showed that the water was safe. The sewage diversion, which occurred Friday, was blamed on electrical failures and a lightning strike that disabled pumps at the 30-year-old Hyperion sewage treatment plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1987
A worker at the Hyperion sewage treatment plant near Playa del Rey accidentally opened the wrong valve Thursday and sent 10,000 gallons of "over-chlorinated, fully treated, secondary" sewage toward ocean waters a mile off Dockweiler State Beach, Los Angeles City officials said. Del Biagi, director of the city's Bureau of Sanitation, said the accidental discharge posed no danger to swimmers although the over-chlorinated effluent could affect fish and other marine life.
SPORTS
September 18, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
OAKLAND - The Oakland Athletics' need for a new stadium was highlighted again Tuesday night when a sewage backup from a bathroom adjacent to the A's dugout forced players and coaches to watch the final three innings of their 2-1 walk-off win over the Angels from the top step. The problem wasn't as severe as the massive sewage backup that spilled into both clubhouses in June, forcing players from the A's and Seattle Mariners to shower in the Oakland Raiders' locker room at O.co Coliseum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | By Gale Holland
The Upper Newport Bay, usually buzzing with kayakers and outdoor enthusiasts, remains closed to swimming and other recreational uses after a sewage spill. The closure includes Newport Dunes, a popular recreation and swimming area. The sewage spill was reported Saturday. Any updates will be posted on the Orange County Health Care Agency's website . ALSO: Balboa Pier remains closed after being slammed by boat Vincent Thomas Bridge will close Labor Day morning for marathon 10 in hospital after tour bus crash on way to San Diego County casino gale.holland@latimes Twitter: @geholland
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2013 | By Gale Holland
On the last big weekend of the summer, bay waters from the Upper Newport Bay to Newport Dunes remain closed to swimming, diving and other recreational uses because of a sewage spill, officials said Sunday. The closure was ordered after a spill Saturday and remains in effect until further notice. Any updates will be posted on Orange County's ocean water protection program site . ALSO: Weather to cool for Labor Day, then heat up  Yosemite fire in the top ten; what are the other nine?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A 600-foot stretch of Mariposa Street Beach in San Clemente has been closed due to a sewage spill, officials said Tuesday afternoon. The area will be closed until further notice, the Orange County Health Care Agency said. Officials with the agency also reported Tuesday that bacteria levels had exceeded health standards at three other beaches in Newport Bay, Dana Point and San Clemente. In Newport Bay, high levels of bacteria were detected at Sapphire Street Beach and at Bayside Drive Beach on Balboa Island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
An environmental crusader known as "Mr. Malibu" has apologized to Pepperdine University and retracted accusations that the school is to blame for effluent flowing down Marie Canyon Creek and into the Pacific Ocean. In exchange, the university has agreed to drop a lawsuit against activist Cary ONeal that alleged libel and "invasion of privacy by placing person in a false light in public eye. " In two videos he posted online, ONeal claimed that a foamy substance pooling on a Malibu beach was sewage released by Pepperdine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Will somebody come clean about those soap-like bubbles in Malibu's tiny Marie Canyon Creek? A legal battle between an environmental crusader and Pepperdine University is raising questions about a frothy cascade of storm water that periodically spills over a beach lined with celebrity homes and into the Pacific Ocean. Videographer Cary ONeal, who blogs as "Mr. Malibu," insists that the runoff is tainted by a sewage treatment plant that serves the university and a housing tract next door, and that the school should be held to task for it. Pepperdine officials dispute that and have gone to court to prevent ONeal's accusation and home-made videos of the sudsy flow from going viral.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Newport Beach's Harbor Quality Committee has voted to oppose the Orange County Sanitation District's practice of discharging partially treated sewage into the ocean. The district holds a controversial federal waiver so it doesn't have to meet the federal mandate that all sewage receive secondary treatment. The waiver allows the district to discharge waste water containing higher concentrations of bacteria, human waste and other solids than are allowed almost anywhere else in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The city of Solvang has agreed to process the extra sewage generated by the casino that the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians plans to open at the end of the month. The tribe's $1-million-plus water treatment facility will be finished in about a year. Solvang officials agreed to provide up to 40,000 gallons of sewage capacity each day at a one-time cost of about $73,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Opponents malign it as "toilet to tap. " But a new National Research Council report says that reclaimed water can contribute a growing portion of the nation's drinking water supplies and be as safe as conventional sources. The assessment is especially relevant to Southern California, which has been a pioneer in recharging local aquifers with treated wastewater but still sends most of its runoff and treated water to the Pacific Ocean. A decade ago, public outcry and electoral politics thwarted a Los Angeles plan to partially replenish San Fernando Valley groundwater with recycled supplies.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Here's a posting from the "ick" files. Scientsts are now delving into an uncharted environment to study human and other viruses: raw sewage. In a study published Tuesday in the online journal mBio, researchers from the U.S. and Spainfound that untreated human wastewater -- "the effluence of society," they wrote -- contains an incredible diversity of viruses ... and that the vast majority are viruses we hadn't known of before. Click for the abstract . At this point, biologists know of about 3,000 different viruses, representing 84 different viral families -- but they suspect that those known bugs are just the tip of the iceberg.
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