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Sewage Disposal

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NEWS
January 21, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the West's latest boom town. Seemingly overnight, Laughlin has metamorphosed from an unremarkable blip on the Colorado River to a thriving tourist mecca teeming with gamblers. Only trouble is, visitors leave more than dollars behind when they hop in the RV and head for home; they also leave sewage. And if the high rollers are to continue answering nature's call between blackjack hands, a way must be found to dispose of the mounting volume of waste.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two decades, water quality tests seemed to prove that piping partially treated sewage into the ocean four miles off Huntington Beach was cost-effective and safe. So when high levels of bacteria forced health officials to close the city's shoreline for most of the summer of 1999 and again in 2000, no one even considered that the Orange County Sanitation District's "outfall" pipe could be a factor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1988
Business, government and community leaders will attend a special meeting Thursday to address sewage disposal in the county. Several alternatives will be explored. It has been estimated that if the county discontinues its practice of disposing of waste in the ocean, installing alternative disposal systems could cost more than $300 million.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heat of another Central Valley workday bounces off the pickup hood as Edd Palla rolls past his sprouting farm fields. Over there is alfalfa. Up a bit stand the sugar beets. And just down the road is the tail end of the Los Angeles sewer system. Each day, more than 50 big-rig trucks from metropolitan sewer plants rattle into Kern County loaded with sludge, the goopy final product of urban waste water. One billion pounds is spread annually on the county's cropland, making Kern the state's No.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The heat of another Central Valley workday bounces off the pickup hood as Edd Palla rolls past his sprouting farm fields. Over there is alfalfa. Up a bit stand the sugar beets. And just down the road is the tail end of the Los Angeles sewer system. Each day, more than 50 big-rig trucks from metropolitan sewer plants rattle into Kern County loaded with sludge, the goopy final product of urban waste water. One billion pounds is spread annually on the county's cropland, making Kern the state's No.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | PETER H. KING
George Bush was in town Friday, but the man who campaigned as Your Environmental President neglected to even mention it. Gov. Wilson was here, too, promising millions to fix it--and fending off criticism that, as San Diego's mayor, he'd blown the best chance to prevent it. Tourists caught wind of it, and the cancellations poured in. America's Cup racers pinched their noses and gamely sailed on by it. It could be seen Friday afternoon from Point Loma, near the mouth of glittering San Diego Bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1999 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to end a long-running battle over plans to release highly treated waste water into Upper Newport Bay, the Irvine Ranch Water District has come up with a plan it says would put dramatically less water into the bay. But a lawyer for the environmental group that has been fighting the district's plans said a judge's order bars any waste water at all. "The bottom line is, we don't think reclaimed water belongs in the bay," said Mark Wolfe, the attorney for Defend the Bay. "The judge agreed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plans to dump hundreds of millions of gallons of highly treated sewage into Upper Newport Bay were temporarily halted Friday by a judge who said that studies to date have not proved that plants, birds and humans won't be harmed. Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert E. Thomas, siding with the Defend the Bay environmental group, said the Irvine Ranch Water District's permit application did not fully support its contention that the project won't damage the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Irvine Ranch Water District officials will debate community members Thursday over a plan to discharge millions of gallons of recycled waste water daily into Upper Newport Bay. Water district President Darryl Miller and executive director Ronald Young will argue for the district's proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Two officials of Irvine Ranch Water District have agreed to debate a water-use expert and a member of a city-appointed committee on a plan to empty millions of gallons of recycled waste water daily into Upper Newport Bay. Water district President Darryl Miller and Executive Director Ronald Young will defend the district's proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1999 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to end a long-running battle over plans to release highly treated waste water into Upper Newport Bay, the Irvine Ranch Water District has come up with a plan it says would put dramatically less water into the bay. But a lawyer for the environmental group that has been fighting the district's plans said a judge's order bars any waste water at all. "The bottom line is, we don't think reclaimed water belongs in the bay," said Mark Wolfe, the attorney for Defend the Bay. "The judge agreed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plans to dump hundreds of millions of gallons of highly treated sewage into Upper Newport Bay were temporarily halted Friday by a judge who said that studies to date have not proved that plants, birds and humans won't be harmed. Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert E. Thomas, siding with the Defend the Bay environmental group, said the Irvine Ranch Water District's permit application did not fully support its contention that the project won't damage the environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County district attorney's office is investigating whether the Capistrano Beach Water District broke environmental laws by improperly disposing of sewage. The probe has been underway for more than a month and a search warrant was served by district attorney's investigators at the water district administration offices near Doheny State Beach last week, said Valerie Griswold, a senior deputy district attorney in the department's environmental protection unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Irvine Ranch Water District officials will debate community members Thursday over a plan to discharge millions of gallons of recycled waste water daily into Upper Newport Bay. Water district President Darryl Miller and executive director Ronald Young will argue for the district's proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Two officials of Irvine Ranch Water District have agreed to debate a water-use expert and a member of a city-appointed committee on a plan to empty millions of gallons of recycled waste water daily into Upper Newport Bay. Water district President Darryl Miller and Executive Director Ronald Young will defend the district's proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Irvine Ranch Water District has agreed to pay $45,000 to settle a complaint that it illegally dumped treated waste water into San Joaquin Freshwater Marsh, a tributary to San Diego Creek and Newport Bay, officials said this week. The fine was assessed by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board after state and water district officials met Tuesday, said Joanne E. Schneider, the state board's environmental program manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A government proposal to solve Aliso Creek's pollution problems by piping chemical-laden creek water 2 1/2 miles out at sea has come under fire from environmentalist and homeowners' groups. "We're calling it a 'contamination diversion' project because that's what it is," said Mike Beanan, vice president for the South Laguna Civic Assn. "Their plan is to pump it into the outfall [pipe], letting it go in the ocean and not treating it at all."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1995 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
The city will wait until Nov. 27 to take a stand on the Irvine Ranch Water District's plan to empty treated sewage into Upper Newport Bay. The City Council was to vote Monday night on whether to support or oppose the water district project, which would release 5 million gallons of reclaimed waste water daily into San Diego Creek near the Irvine-Newport Beach boundary and, eventually, into the bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A government proposal to solve Aliso Creek's pollution problems by piping chemical-laden creek water 2 1/2 miles out at sea has come under fire from environmentalist and homeowners' groups. "We're calling it a 'contamination diversion' project because that's what it is," said Mike Beanan, vice president for the South Laguna Civic Assn. "Their plan is to pump it into the outfall [pipe], letting it go in the ocean and not treating it at all."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
The Irvine Ranch Water District on Monday is expected to certify a controversial report that outlines the impact of emptying millions of gallons of reclaimed water into Upper Newport Bay during winter months. Last week, the City Council vehemently opposed the project. Opponents have said it would endanger the ecology of the bay and pose a public health hazard.
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