Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSewage Spills San Diego County
IN THE NEWS

Sewage Spills San Diego County

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | PETER H. KING
George Bush was in town Friday, but the man who campaigned as Your Environmental President neglected to even mention it. Gov. Wilson was here, too, promising millions to fix it--and fending off criticism that, as San Diego's mayor, he'd blown the best chance to prevent it. Tourists caught wind of it, and the cancellations poured in. America's Cup racers pinched their noses and gamely sailed on by it. It could be seen Friday afternoon from Point Loma, near the mouth of glittering San Diego Bay.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After discharging up to 180 million gallons of partially treated waste each day for more than two months, the rupture in the city's sewage outfall pipeline was repaired last weekend. The cost of 63 days of repairs was estimated to be $11 million. Another $4.5 million is expected to be spent on covering the pipe with "armor rock" for stability and protection, City Manager Jack McGory said. The cause of the break, discovered Feb. 2 by the Coast Guard, is still under investigation.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's sewage woes worsened Friday when the massive spill from a ruptured underwater pipeline combined with an overflow of raw sewage from Tijuana to close 20 miles of beach from the international border north to the San Diego River.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
San Diego County health officials have lifted a quarantine on almost half of the 20 miles of coastline that were closed after a ruptured outfall pipe and raw sewage from Mexico combined to contaminate beaches. The ban was lifted on about nine miles of beaches when Mexican sewage pumps were restarted after being idled since Feb. 7 by heavy rains.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive sewage spill off Point Loma threatens catastrophe for several local businesses whose livelihoods are tied to giant offshore kelp beds. Already, one small but specialized enterprise has been hard-hit by the spill: divers' plucking of sea urchins to be turned into sushi. "We're not buying from off Point Loma until this thing is cleared," said Dave Rudie, spokesman for Catalina Offshore Products, which processes the divers' catch for market in the United States and Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
San Diego County health officials have lifted a quarantine on almost half of the 20 miles of coastline that were closed after a ruptured outfall pipe and raw sewage from Mexico combined to contaminate beaches. The ban was lifted on about nine miles of beaches when Mexican sewage pumps were restarted after being idled since Feb. 7 by heavy rains.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County health authorities reported that bacterial counts dropped for a second day Friday but, despite the news, said they will continue to quarantine 20 miles of coastline through the weekend. For the fourth straight day, only the tip of the Point Loma Peninsula recorded readings of fecal coliform bacteria in excess of the legal limit, and once again, health officials blamed concern over the daily overflow of 180 million gallons of partially treated sewage offshore for the closures.
NEWS
February 15, 1992 | MARK PLATTE and MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state's Regional Water Quality Control Board has ordered the city of San Diego to hire an independent inspection team to investigate the cause of the massive sewage spill that occurred off Point Loma nearly two weeks ago, the city manager disclosed Friday.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | from a Times Staff Writer
Toxic bacterial counts caused by ongoing sewage spills dipped dramatically Wednesday, prompting San Diego County health authorities to say that they may lift a 20-mile quarantine of area coastline as early as Friday morning. For the first time since the rupture of a massive sewage outfall pipe Feb. 2, bacterial readings fell below the legal limit, except at the tip of the Point Loma Peninsula, said Ruth Covill, a spokeswoman for the San Diego County Department of Health Services.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After discharging up to 180 million gallons of partially treated waste each day for more than two months, the rupture in the city's sewage outfall pipeline was repaired last weekend. The cost of 63 days of repairs was estimated to be $11 million. Another $4.5 million is expected to be spent on covering the pipe with "armor rock" for stability and protection, City Manager Jack McGory said. The cause of the break, discovered Feb. 2 by the Coast Guard, is still under investigation.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County health authorities reported that bacterial counts dropped for a second day Friday but, despite the news, said they will continue to quarantine 20 miles of coastline through the weekend. For the fourth straight day, only the tip of the Point Loma Peninsula recorded readings of fecal coliform bacteria in excess of the legal limit, and once again, health officials blamed concern over the daily overflow of 180 million gallons of partially treated sewage offshore for the closures.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | from a Times Staff Writer
Toxic bacterial counts caused by ongoing sewage spills dipped dramatically Wednesday, prompting San Diego County health authorities to say that they may lift a 20-mile quarantine of area coastline as early as Friday morning. For the first time since the rupture of a massive sewage outfall pipe Feb. 2, bacterial readings fell below the legal limit, except at the tip of the Point Loma Peninsula, said Ruth Covill, a spokeswoman for the San Diego County Department of Health Services.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Divers working a mile offshore have discovered a second major break in the massive outfall pipe that for more than two weeks has sent as much as 180 million gallons a day of partially treated sewage spewing into the ocean, officials said Tuesday. Underwater teams discovered a "partial joint separation" about 5,800 feet from the rocky cliffs of Point Loma at a depth of 55 feet Sunday and found joint movement in the pipe.
NEWS
February 15, 1992 | MARK PLATTE and MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state's Regional Water Quality Control Board has ordered the city of San Diego to hire an independent inspection team to investigate the cause of the massive sewage spill that occurred off Point Loma nearly two weeks ago, the city manager disclosed Friday.
NEWS
February 14, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY and MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Workers at the city's waste water treatment plant said Thursday that a diversion of sewage within the facility created a large air bubble that caused the building to shake violently two days before the Coast Guard discovered a massive spill off the coast of Point Loma. Five employees said the combination of opening a diversion gate and the use of a valve that had not been opened for several months trapped air in the huge outfall pipe on the morning of Jan.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An untimely and unlucky combination of tropical storms and faulty piping led to Southern California's biggest beach quarantine in recent memory, with nearly 100 miles of coastline placed off limits by health authorities due to sewage spills. Officials said Wednesday that the beaches would remain closed at least until the weekend, and if the rain persists the quarantine could remain in effect indefinitely.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Engineers had warned city officials two years ago that a sewage outfall pipe was corroded and could cause the kind of massive spill of partly treated sewage that continued to gush into the ocean Thursday. In other developments: * The multiple rupture of the huge pipeline kept spewing as much as 180 million gallons a day into the water less than a mile from shore, but repair work had to be put off until today at the earliest as a winter storm pounded the coastline and more storms are expected.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive storm, expected to bring heavy rain for the rest of the week, halted repair work Monday on a broken sewage pipe, which was still gushing more than 180 million gallons a day of partly treated sewage into the ocean. The storm also forced the indefinite closure of a pump station that treats 12 million gallons of Tijuana's raw sewage each day. That sewage overflow mixed with floodwaters to add another 100 million gallons a day or more to the contaminated offshore waters.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive storm, expected to bring heavy rain for the rest of the week, halted repair work Monday on a broken sewage pipe, which was still gushing more than 180 million gallons a day of partly treated sewage into the ocean. The storm also forced the indefinite closure of a pump station that treats 12 million gallons of Tijuana's raw sewage each day. That sewage overflow mixed with floodwaters to add another 100 million gallons a day or more to the contaminated offshore waters.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | PETER H. KING
George Bush was in town Friday, but the man who campaigned as Your Environmental President neglected to even mention it. Gov. Wilson was here, too, promising millions to fix it--and fending off criticism that, as San Diego's mayor, he'd blown the best chance to prevent it. Tourists caught wind of it, and the cancellations poured in. America's Cup racers pinched their noses and gamely sailed on by it. It could be seen Friday afternoon from Point Loma, near the mouth of glittering San Diego Bay.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|