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Sewage Spills Ventura County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning signs were posted at several spots around the Ventura Keys on Tuesday after approximately 900 gallons of untreated sewage gushed into Ventura Harbor. The untreated effluent was discharged Monday into a storm drain near Arundell Circle after something--probably branches or leaves--clogged a sewer line. The sewage traveled from the storm drain into the Arundell Barranca and then to Ventura Harbor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning signs were posted at several spots around the Ventura Keys on Tuesday after approximately 900 gallons of untreated sewage gushed into Ventura Harbor. The untreated effluent was discharged Monday into a storm drain near Arundell Circle after something--probably branches or leaves--clogged a sewer line. The sewage traveled from the storm drain into the Arundell Barranca and then to Ventura Harbor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | JULIE SCHEERES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At least 16 million gallons of raw sewage has spewed into the ocean from a sewer main that ruptured in Thousand Oaks, prompting officials to close 30 miles of beach in Ventura and Los Angeles counties. Heavy flooding in Arroyo Canal washed out 30 feet of pipe along one of two trunk lines to the city's sewer plant Tuesday morning and crews have been working around the clock to stem the flow, said Don Nelson, the city's director of public works.
NEWS
May 16, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State regulators on Friday slapped the city with a $2.1-million fine--believed to be the largest of its kind in California history--for a massive sewer spill that closed 29 miles of beaches in February. "The fact is, this spill was totally avoidable," said Dennis Dickerson, executive officer of the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board. "It did not have to happen. The city simply could have acted to upgrade the [sewer] line."
NEWS
May 16, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State regulators on Friday slapped the city with a $2.1-million fine--believed to be the largest of its kind in California history--for a massive sewer spill that closed 29 miles of beaches in February. "The fact is, this spill was totally avoidable," said Dennis Dickerson, executive officer of the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board. "It did not have to happen. The city simply could have acted to upgrade the [sewer] line."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1998 | DARYL KELLEY and CATHY MURILLO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With a rare criminal inquiry hanging over their heads, Thousand Oaks city officials said Wednesday that an act of God, not a violation of law, led to a massive sewage spill this month that closed 30 miles of beaches in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. "We haven't committed any crime," City Atty. Mark Sellers said. "We have had an unprecedented weather event that caused a torrent of rainwaters to break this [sewer] line. It's not a crime to be struck by an act of God."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1998 | CATHY MURILLO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials grappling with the aftermath of an 86-million-gallon sewage spill are investigating a new report of contamination in Conejo Valley creeks. The report came from Westlake Village environmental attorney Edward Masry, who contends that high bacteria counts are the result of leaking municipal sewer lines. But state water quality officials say they believe that runoff--particularly from stables--is the culprit.
NEWS
March 1, 1990
One of the largest sewage spills in Ventura County history flooded the Arroyo Las Posas near Moorpark after recent heavy rains filled a sewage settling pond, an Environmental Health Department supervisor said this week. Four million gallons of liquid poured into the arroyo Feb. 14, officials said. The channel drains into Calleguas Creek and eventually Mugu Lagoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1995 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to heed state law and protect public health, county administrators on Monday recommended that the county begin closely monitoring ocean pollution and posting signs on public beaches after major sewage spills. The Ventura County Board of Supervisors is expected to authorize money today to upgrade the environmental health program that in recent years has failed to inform the public when ocean waters are too polluted to enter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1998 | CATHY MURILLO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
City officials grappling with the aftermath of an 86-million-gallon sewage spill are investigating a new report of contamination in Conejo Valley creeks. The report came from Westlake Village environmental attorney Edward Masry, who contends that high bacteria counts are the result of leaking municipal sewer lines. But state water quality officials say they believe that runoff--particularly from stables--is the culprit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1998 | DARYL KELLEY and CATHY MURILLO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With a rare criminal inquiry hanging over their heads, Thousand Oaks city officials said Wednesday that an act of God, not a violation of law, led to a massive sewage spill this month that closed 30 miles of beaches in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. "We haven't committed any crime," City Atty. Mark Sellers said. "We have had an unprecedented weather event that caused a torrent of rainwaters to break this [sewer] line. It's not a crime to be struck by an act of God."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | JULIE SCHEERES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At least 16 million gallons of raw sewage has spewed into the ocean from a sewer main that ruptured in Thousand Oaks, prompting officials to close 30 miles of beach in Ventura and Los Angeles counties. Heavy flooding in Arroyo Canal washed out 30 feet of pipe along one of two trunk lines to the city's sewer plant Tuesday morning and crews have been working around the clock to stem the flow, said Don Nelson, the city's director of public works.
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