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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Park advocates, homeowner activists and private septic tank haulers are fighting a plan by the city Bureau of Sanitation to truck septic tank wastes from throughout Los Angeles and adjoining areas to a sewage treatment plant in the Sepulveda Basin, it was learned Thursday. The septic tank plan is a threat to the San Fernando Valley's premier park space, according to the coalition of opponents, who have appealed a recent city Planning Commission action clearing the way for the waste trucks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1993 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Park advocates, homeowner activists and private septic tank haulers are fighting a plan by the city Bureau of Sanitation to truck septic tank wastes from throughout Los Angeles and adjoining areas to a sewage treatment plant in the Sepulveda Basin, it was learned Thursday. The septic tank plan is a threat to the San Fernando Valley's premier park space, according to the coalition of opponents, who have appealed a recent city Planning Commission action clearing the way for the waste trucks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1988 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
An advisory panel writing a growth-management plan for San Diego wrapped up 16 months of deliberations Wednesday by adding a controversial "killer clause" to the blueprint. The panelists also rebuffed efforts to limit home building until the city improves its air and water quality, sewage treatment, transportation system and trash-disposal system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1987 | NANCY RAY, Times Staff Writer
Each present and future resident of San Diego County owes $570 a year for the next 20 years to finance the necessities of life, according to a San Diego Assn. of Governments survey made public Friday. The bill for adequate water, power, sewage, transportation and trash collection services countywide will add up to $32.2 billion through 2005, with more than half the costs--$18.8 billion--attributed to growth in the region over the next two decades.
NEWS
March 10, 1985 | SOLL SUSSMAN, Associated Press
Mexico's supercity, a noisy jumble of traffic, people and pollution, lost sight of its own surroundings as it grew swiftly into what will soon be the world's biggest urban sprawl. Only on a rare day does the heavy smog lift sufficiently to give greater Mexico City's 17 million residents--roughly a fourth of the national population--a view of the snow-capped volcanoes that ring their valley, a magnificent panorama they took for granted just a generation ago.
NEWS
December 28, 1999 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Year 2000 computer bug has already caused what no hurricane or mudslide or tornado ever has: Every state and federal emergency response center in the nation has been activated. If the latest forecasts prove correct, the thousands of emergency management professionals will be no busier this weekend than the proverbial Maytag repairman, U.S. officials said Monday.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you've ever bought anything over the Internet, chances are you've dealt with an Ingram. Operating in the background of the exploding world of electronic commerce, the Ingram family controls a $25-billion empire that consists of the biggest distributors in many of the leading online consumer-product categories: computer hardware, software, books, movies and video games. The family's holdings include Santa Ana-based Ingram Micro Inc.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | DAN FINNIGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dressed in bright teal jackets and baseball caps, the people who clean and patrol downtown Philadelphia these days look more like amusement park employees than they do municipal workers. In fact, if you stop to ask any of them for the shortest path to the Liberty Bell, you will get exactly what you would expect from any Disneyland employee--a smile, a point in the right direction and encouragement that the walk is short.
NEWS
December 28, 1999 | HELENE ELLIOTT and RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fearful of Y2K-related havoc and unimpressed by an apparent mismatch between Stanford and favored Wisconsin, college football fans are bucking tradition by giving Saturday's Rose parade and Rose Bowl game the cold shoulder. Because only about 1,000 game tickets are sold to the public and most of the rest are earmarked for the participating schools and the Pacific 10 and Big Ten conferences, the game will be sold out for the 53rd consecutive year.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | PATRICK Mc DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Miguel Angel Rodriguez, 18, recently left his job in a U.S.-owned furniture manufacturing plant here to strike out for his ultimate destination: New York, where relatives and, he hopes, better-paid work awaits. "There's no future for me here," Rodriguez said as he stood by the rusted steel curtain that marks the border, eager to make his break north. A few miles to the east, Irma Aragon, a mother of eight, said her job assembling radar components at another U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1992
Questionnaires were distributed to candidates last month. Answers have been edited to fit the available space. Why Run? Question: Why do you want to be a Ventura County supervisor? Erickson Kildee: In 1992 the issues that prompt me to run for 3rd District supervisor are the economy, health care, local government cooperation, delivery of cost-effective services to citizens, and the preservation of agriculture and our rural heritage.
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