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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1997
What the heck is going on at the Sepulveda Basin? One day, a lowlife with a gun is shooting at a rap artist in the tunnels beneath a sewage treatment plant, and a few days later, ninja assassins are rappelling down a wall and crashing cars on an adjacent access road. Not too long ago, a maniacal police chief at the plant's administration building dispatched a cyborg killer to execute a kick-boxing Secret Service agent.
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OPINION
September 1, 2013
Re "Coalition asks Brown to halt fracking in California," Aug. 29 Gov. Jerry Brown implies that California needs the money fracking would provide as much as it needs environmental protection. What California depends on is water. We all need water, and each fracking well consumes millions of gallons of that precious stuff, never to be reclaimed. You can't purify the chemicals out or flush out the aquifer if an earthquake cracks a shaft and the chemical mixture drains into the groundwater.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tears of joy aren't all that is flowing when brides and grooms meet at Los Angeles' most unexpected wedding spot. That's because a sewage treatment plant is the newest destination for couples seeking an unforgettable place to pledge to love one another through thick and thin. They recite their marriage vows from a bridge above a pond filled with effluent at the Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant.
OPINION
October 17, 2012 | By Mark Gold
On Thursday, one of the country's most effective environmental laws - the federal Clean Water Act - will turn 40. Los Angeles County residents owe the law a huge debt of gratitude. Because of it, Santa Monica Bay no longer has a dead zone, its bottom fish no longer have tumors and fin rot, and the days of baywide summer beach closures due to multimillion-gallon sewage spills are long gone. These successes didn't simply happen. They required the combined efforts of government and public activists, and took considerable financial investment, along with excellent engineering and construction work, and leadership at multiple levels.
SCIENCE
December 24, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The "rotten cabbage" odor near sewage treatment plants, whose source has been a mystery for decades, is probably the result of trace concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide in wastewater, a German-American team reported online this week in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. DMSO, a common industrial solvent, is not itself odorous or toxic, but it can readily be converted to foul-smelling dimethyl sulfide by bacteria.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2004
* A Fluor Corp. joint venture was awarded two Defense Department contracts Tuesday that eventually could total $1.1 billion to build and repair water and sewage treatment plants in Iraq. The contracts were awarded to South Carolina-based FluorAmec, which is owned by Aliso Viejo-based Fluor and British engineering firm Amec. * WorldCom Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Gov. Gray Davis has signed into law a bill that exempts the Orange County Sanitation District from state fines as long as it acts in good faith to upgrade sewage treatment by 2013. The district holds a federal waiver from the Clean Water Act that allows it to discharge dirtier sewage than nearly all of the nation's 16,000 sewage treatment plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1988
A two-year program began Wednesday aimed at lessening the burden on Los Angeles' aging sewer system by using smoke devices to detect illegal connections. The devices are designed to discharge smoke that can be traced through roof vents on houses connected to the city's sewer lines. "By repairing damaged sewer lines and finding illegal connections, we can guarantee the integrity of the sewer system," Board of Public Works Commissioner Kathleen Brown said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1997 | LIZ SEYMOUR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lax state enforcement has resulted in nearly 150 violations of the Clean Water Act by Orange County's four sewage treatment plants in the last four years, a public-interest group said Thursday. The California Public Research Interest Group also found that regional water boards, which are responsible for enforcement, rarely fine polluters and that the fines are so minuscule they don't act as deterrents.
NEWS
July 29, 1988
The federal and state governments teamed up to sue San Diego for discharging raw and inadequately treated sewage into the ocean and local waterways 1,814 times since 1983. The San Diego federal court civil suit by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state Regional Water Quality Control Board accuses the city of ignoring a July 1 deadline to upgrade its sewage facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Will somebody come clean about those soap-like bubbles in Malibu's tiny Marie Canyon Creek? A legal battle between an environmental crusader and Pepperdine University is raising questions about a frothy cascade of storm water that periodically spills over a beach lined with celebrity homes and into the Pacific Ocean. Videographer Cary ONeal, who blogs as "Mr. Malibu," insists that the runoff is tainted by a sewage treatment plant that serves the university and a housing tract next door, and that the school should be held to task for it. Pepperdine officials dispute that and have gone to court to prevent ONeal's accusation and home-made videos of the sudsy flow from going viral.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2009 | Associated Press
Fish caught near wastewater treatment plants serving five major U.S. cities had residues of pharmaceuticals in them, including medicines used to treat high cholesterol, allergies, high blood pressure, bipolar disorder and depression, researchers reported Wednesday. Findings from this first nationwide study of human drugs in fish tissue have prompted the Environmental Protection Agency to expand similar research to more than 150 locations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2008 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Sewage-treatment plants in Southern California are failing to remove hormones and hormone-altering chemicals from water that gets flushed into coastal ocean waters, according to the results of a study released Saturday. The preliminary findings were part of the most ambitious study to date on the effect of emerging chemical contaminants in coastal oceans.
WORLD
January 29, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
An Australian state will become the nation's first to introduce recycled sewage to its drinking water, and the rest of Australia could follow suit, a state leader said today. Queensland Premier Peter Beattie said falling reservoir levels left his government with no choice but to introduce recycled water next year in the state's southeast, one of Australia's fastest growing urban areas.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion and fire ripped through a liquid waste treatment facility in Cleveland as crews worked on a tank, injuring six people and sending smoke billowing across highways. Workers were using cutting tools when the fire broke out, Fire Department spokesman Larry Gray said. Smoke could be seen pouring through holes in the roof of the General Environmental Management facility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A new sewage plant will be housed in a building that looks like a farmhouse in an effort to hide it in a planned community. The $9.5-million plant will be in a vintage-looking facade rather than the typical concrete block building. Planners also added stained glass above the entry doors, landscaping, park benches and a trail. Making the plant more visually appealing cost the city an additional $500,000, but it was worth it, said John Lovejoy, special projects manager.
OPINION
September 1, 2013
Re "Coalition asks Brown to halt fracking in California," Aug. 29 Gov. Jerry Brown implies that California needs the money fracking would provide as much as it needs environmental protection. What California depends on is water. We all need water, and each fracking well consumes millions of gallons of that precious stuff, never to be reclaimed. You can't purify the chemicals out or flush out the aquifer if an earthquake cracks a shaft and the chemical mixture drains into the groundwater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2008 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Sewage-treatment plants in Southern California are failing to remove hormones and hormone-altering chemicals from water that gets flushed into coastal ocean waters, according to the results of a study released Saturday. The preliminary findings were part of the most ambitious study to date on the effect of emerging chemical contaminants in coastal oceans.
SCIENCE
December 24, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The "rotten cabbage" odor near sewage treatment plants, whose source has been a mystery for decades, is probably the result of trace concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide in wastewater, a German-American team reported online this week in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. DMSO, a common industrial solvent, is not itself odorous or toxic, but it can readily be converted to foul-smelling dimethyl sulfide by bacteria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2005 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
Contaminants from the Central Coast beach town of Los Osos, which still uses septic tanks to treat sewage from thousands of homes, are fouling groundwater and seeping into the neighboring Morro Bay National Estuary, according to state officials. Although groundwater pollution was discovered in the town of 15,000 more than two decades ago, state officials have not been able to stop it -- despite a ban on new septic tank hookups in most of the town.
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