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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1988
Treated sewage pumped into outer Los Angeles Harbor has been violating state health limits on contamination at times during the last month and may continue through this weekend, City of Los Angeles sanitation officials said Thursday. Suspected discharges from industries on Terminal Island and elsewhere in the vicinity of the Port of Los Angeles are being investigated as the cause, said Norm Hanson, manager of the city's Terminal Island sewage treatment plant.
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NEWS
March 6, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
In one of the largest sewage spills in state history, a pipe leading from an unreliable sewage pump station in San Diego's burgeoning northern tier ruptured Thursday, causing the station to shut down as millions of gallons of raw sewage flowed into a nearby lagoon and eventually into the ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1989 | THOMAS BECHER, Times Staff Writer
Concerned about a rash of sewage spills that have closed beaches five times this year, Laguna Beach officials are moving toward upgrading the city's sewage pump stations by installing backup generators and electronic warning systems. At stake, officials say, is the city's reputation as a progressive, clean arts colony and a popular spot for thousands of summer tourists. "We're most noted for the arts and small-town charm," Councilman Dan Kenney said.
NEWS
November 6, 1987 | KEVIN RODERICK and LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writers
While Los Angeles-area beaches remained closed for a fifth day, Mayor Tom Bradley's chief deputy protested Thursday that city sewage leaks have been wrongly blamed for bacteria that led health officials to declare Santa Monica Bay unsafe for swimmers. Deputy Mayor Mike Gage, unleashing an attack on Los Angeles County officials in Bradley's absence, produced evidence that the bacteria could only have come from contaminated storm drain runoff carried into the bay by recent rains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1990 | FRANK MESSINA
A construction accident caused 9,000 gallons of raw sewage to pour into the ocean off Aliso State Beach Wednesday, forcing authorities to close 200 yards of shoreline to the public, city officials said. The stretch of beach north of the Aliso Pier will be off-limits to swimmers for two to three days while county health officials test the bacteria level in the ocean, said Terry Brandt, director of city municipal services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1991 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 50,000 gallons of raw sewage spewed from an underground water-pump system into the street Wednesday night and into the storm drain system flowing toward the ocean, authorities said. The spill apparently occurred when a pump malfunctioned at the Cypress Villa Apartments at 201 N. East St. at 9:30 p.m., Fire Department dispatcher Jonathan Wilkes said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1996 | HUGO MARTIN
Two North Hollywood residents have filed a class-action suit against the city of Los Angeles contending that its sewage rate system unfairly overcharges many city residents. In the suit, plaintiffs Ivan Shinkle and Barbara Crawford urge a Los Angeles Superior Court judge to halt the city from using the current sewage rate system. The suit alleges that city residents have been overcharged by $52 million to $65 million in sewer fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1992 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Beaches north of the Aliso Pier were reopened on Monday morning after tests by the county showed no bacterial contamination in the water following a sewage spill on Jan. 8. "The tests revealed that there was not sewage in the water, so we were able to reopen a lot sooner than we expected," said Robert E. Merryman, director of the county's Environmental Health Division.
NEWS
July 29, 1988
The federal and state governments teamed up to sue San Diego for discharging raw and inadequately treated sewage into the ocean and local waterways 1,814 times since 1983. The San Diego federal court civil suit by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state Regional Water Quality Control Board accuses the city of ignoring a July 1 deadline to upgrade its sewage facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1987
Electrical troubles forced Los Angeles to divert 4.9 million gallons of treated sewage out the one-mile ocean outfall at the Hyperion treatment plant near El Segundo, the Department of Public Works announced Wednesday. The sewage, which normally would be pumped five miles out to sea, was discharged Tuesday afternoon, a city spokesman said. The effluent was chlorinated and posed no problem for nearby beaches, the spokesman said.
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