Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSewer Service Charge
IN THE NEWS

Sewer Service Charge

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
A judge has dismissed a legal challenge by North Hollywood activist Ivan Shinkle and the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn. to a fee on users of the city of Los Angeles' sewer service. Shinkle and the taxpayer group had claimed that the fee, which totaled $50 million and has been used to bail out shortfalls in the city budget, violated Proposition 218, which requires voter approval of new property-based taxes and fees.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY
A Superior Court judge on Monday dismissed a lawsuit by two North Hollywood homeowners who claimed that the city of Los Angeles overcharged residents, mostly in the San Fernando Valley, by about $125 million for sewer service. Ivan Schinkle and Barbara Crawford alleged in the 4-year-old lawsuit that the overcharge was a result of a formula abandoned in 1997 that based the sewer fee on the assumption that 60% of water used by a home went into the sewer.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1989
Lower sewer rates: The Irvine Ranch Water District has adopted a 1989-90 budget that includes a reduction in sewer rates and no change in water rates, district officials announced this week. The sewer service charge for a residential customer, now $8.95 a month, will be reduced to $8.35, effective Saturday. The decrease is due to lower operating costs and greater revenue, water district officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
A judge has dismissed a legal challenge by North Hollywood activist Ivan Shinkle and the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn. to a fee on users of the city of Los Angeles' sewer service. Shinkle and the taxpayer group had claimed that the fee, which totaled $50 million and has been used to bail out shortfalls in the city budget, violated Proposition 218, which requires voter approval of new property-based taxes and fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1985
I pay a sewer service charge. I pay a city trash pickup charge. I pay a charge for each rental unit. I pay a charge if I don't move my car on street-sweeping day. Etc., etc. etc. None of the aforementioned charges were ever ballot issues! Why doesn't the deficient City Council demonstrate some real leadership in the volatile political issue of the Police Department? We need 2,000 or more policemen! I voted Yes even though I pay $75 per month for private security guard service at my residence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1994
I take exception to Harriet Bilford's letter (Nov. 20) supporting the diversion of city Department of Water and Power funds to the police force. Her statement that the DWP has "repeatedly gouged the residents of the San Fernando Valley," was written by a customer who might not realize that five other charges--none related to either water or power--are collected on her DWP bills. Four of those added charges collected at the direction of Los Angeles City Hall go directly to city coffers and are not retained in any way by the DWP. First, 10% of each electric bill is added for a city utility tax and goes into the city's general fund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1998
My support goes out to Edauco Pulido for his courage and ability to form a concerned and active group ("Water Bill Touches Off a Revolt," July 24). Pulido and his group had every right to ask questions concerning their water bill. They were mistreated, mocked and made fun of because of their inability to speak the English language. The people who worked at the water company who lost jobs and board positions put themselves in that predicament. What took place in Maywood is a wake-up call to all who feel that just because you live in the United States you must speak English and if you don't we will not deal with you or your problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1990
The government is raising taxes in ways that are disguised more than ever. The newest and most creative way I have recently found is the "sewer service charge." The city of Los Angeles through The Department of Water and Power has since July 5, 1990, imposed a 33.5% increase to residential users and a 34.1% increase to commercial water users. This increase is so drastic that it now costs at times more to get rid of the water than to get it. The city is charging us based on the amount pumped through the meter and not on the amount that is disposed of into the sewers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As debate raged on over inequities in residential sewer fees, the Los Angeles City Council voted Friday to have meters installed at 60 homes throughout the city to see if some residents are paying too much. Councilman Richard Alarcon proposed the meters--four in each of the 15 council districts--in hopes of quelling an ongoing debate over the fairness of the sewer service fee charged to homeowners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1998
This is to rebut Richard Fine's contentions of Jan. 25 concerning the city of Los Angeles sewer service charge program ("Disagreement Over New Sewer Rates," Letters to the Valley Edition). First, it is the height of self-promotion for attorney Fine to claim that a lawsuit, filed July 31, 1996, caused the reorganization of the city's sewer service charge program by April 5, 1997, the effective date of the new method. In fact, the method, based on a customer's water use during the winter, has been under development by the city for more than five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1998
My support goes out to Edauco Pulido for his courage and ability to form a concerned and active group ("Water Bill Touches Off a Revolt," July 24). Pulido and his group had every right to ask questions concerning their water bill. They were mistreated, mocked and made fun of because of their inability to speak the English language. The people who worked at the water company who lost jobs and board positions put themselves in that predicament. What took place in Maywood is a wake-up call to all who feel that just because you live in the United States you must speak English and if you don't we will not deal with you or your problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1998
This is to rebut Richard Fine's contentions of Jan. 25 concerning the city of Los Angeles sewer service charge program ("Disagreement Over New Sewer Rates," Letters to the Valley Edition). First, it is the height of self-promotion for attorney Fine to claim that a lawsuit, filed July 31, 1996, caused the reorganization of the city's sewer service charge program by April 5, 1997, the effective date of the new method. In fact, the method, based on a customer's water use during the winter, has been under development by the city for more than five years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As debate raged on over inequities in residential sewer fees, the Los Angeles City Council voted Friday to have meters installed at 60 homes throughout the city to see if some residents are paying too much. Councilman Richard Alarcon proposed the meters--four in each of the 15 council districts--in hopes of quelling an ongoing debate over the fairness of the sewer service fee charged to homeowners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1994
I take exception to Harriet Bilford's letter (Nov. 20) supporting the diversion of city Department of Water and Power funds to the police force. Her statement that the DWP has "repeatedly gouged the residents of the San Fernando Valley," was written by a customer who might not realize that five other charges--none related to either water or power--are collected on her DWP bills. Four of those added charges collected at the direction of Los Angeles City Hall go directly to city coffers and are not retained in any way by the DWP. First, 10% of each electric bill is added for a city utility tax and goes into the city's general fund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1990
The government is raising taxes in ways that are disguised more than ever. The newest and most creative way I have recently found is the "sewer service charge." The city of Los Angeles through The Department of Water and Power has since July 5, 1990, imposed a 33.5% increase to residential users and a 34.1% increase to commercial water users. This increase is so drastic that it now costs at times more to get rid of the water than to get it. The city is charging us based on the amount pumped through the meter and not on the amount that is disposed of into the sewers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1989
Lower sewer rates: The Irvine Ranch Water District has adopted a 1989-90 budget that includes a reduction in sewer rates and no change in water rates, district officials announced this week. The sewer service charge for a residential customer, now $8.95 a month, will be reduced to $8.35, effective Saturday. The decrease is due to lower operating costs and greater revenue, water district officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY
A Superior Court judge on Monday dismissed a lawsuit by two North Hollywood homeowners who claimed that the city of Los Angeles overcharged residents, mostly in the San Fernando Valley, by about $125 million for sewer service. Ivan Schinkle and Barbara Crawford alleged in the 4-year-old lawsuit that the overcharge was a result of a formula abandoned in 1997 that based the sewer fee on the assumption that 60% of water used by a home went into the sewer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA
Residents and business owners will see increases in their bimonthly water and sewer service bill in August to pay for two capital improvement projects. The San Fernando City Council approved the rate hikes after a handful of residents warned during a hearing Monday that lawns will turn brown. "Our whole city will turn into a dry city," said resident Roberta Philpy. One resident suggested the city remove the green lawn surrounding the San Fernando Mission pictured in its logo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1985
I pay a sewer service charge. I pay a city trash pickup charge. I pay a charge for each rental unit. I pay a charge if I don't move my car on street-sweeping day. Etc., etc. etc. None of the aforementioned charges were ever ballot issues! Why doesn't the deficient City Council demonstrate some real leadership in the volatile political issue of the Police Department? We need 2,000 or more policemen! I voted Yes even though I pay $75 per month for private security guard service at my residence.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|