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NEWS
February 28, 1986 | United Press International
A London borough Thursday banned the use of the word manhole on the grounds it is sexist and ordered sewer workers to use the term access chambers. "It is our policy to use non-sexist language. The word manhole clearly defies it," said a spokesman for the Hackney borough council in east London. "It is an insult to women. Why not call them womenholes?" he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 26, 2012 | By David Lee Preston
At a reception last month in New York, I introduced myself to the Polish film director Agnieszka Holland. "Ah," she said, extending her hand. "I am sorry that I did not include your mother in the movie. " She was referring to "In Darkness," a nominee for best foreign language film at this year's Academy Awards. We'd had friendly correspondence over the last two years. So why did she feel the need to apologize before another word was spoken? Because her film is a fictionalized interpretation of the central episode in my mother's life.
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OPINION
February 26, 2012 | By David Lee Preston
At a reception last month in New York, I introduced myself to the Polish film director Agnieszka Holland. "Ah," she said, extending her hand. "I am sorry that I did not include your mother in the movie. " She was referring to "In Darkness," a nominee for best foreign language film at this year's Academy Awards. We'd had friendly correspondence over the last two years. So why did she feel the need to apologize before another word was spoken? Because her film is a fictionalized interpretation of the central episode in my mother's life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time Roy Parrino held his breath and was lowered into a dark, dank sewer line, he emerged with a two-carat topaz ring, which his wife wears to this day. But as a sewage maintenance worker who helps care for the labyrinth of waste-laden pipes beneath Orange County, discoveries of unexpected jewelry are the only glamorous perks in Parrino's career. Otherwise, it's a thankless job.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John McCormick remembers his baptism. Sixty feet below Los Angeles, he hunkered low as he waded through a river of raw sewage in the labyrinth of cramped tunnels, pipes and waste-water conduits that crisscross the city's insides like dirty veins. As his flashlight beam pierced the roiling, pitch-black netherworld, he slipped on a patch of slime and fell into the muck--up to his neck. McCormick, 54, has seen whole crews go down like dazed dominoes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1988 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER, Times Staff Writer
Working in the city's sewers is not a job for the squeamish. Ask William P. Thacker, who earns a living in and around sewers in the western San Fernando Valley. One day, Thacker got an emergency call: a grease clog was causing raw sewage to back up onto Ventura Boulevard in Encino. "I took the cover off the manhole and it was full of rats--there must have been 200 of them," Thacker said. The rats scattered and, undaunted, Thacker climbed down the manhole and cleaned out the sewer line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1985 | LENORE LOOK, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Department of Public Works severed and capped the sewer pipe of a Glassell Park jewelry recycling center Monday for allegedly dumping extremely high concentrations of cyanide into the sewer system. Rafidain Refinery Inc. at 3060 Roswell St. was found to be dumping up to 800 milligrams of cyanide per liter of water, the highest concentration of the chemical ever found in the city's sewers, according to a spokeswoman for the city's Department of Public Works.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1988 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER, Times Staff Writer
Working in the city's sewers is not a job for the squeamish. Ask William P. Thacker, who earns a living in and around the labyrinth of waste water pipes beneath the San Fernando Valley. One day, Thacker got an emergency call: A grease clog was causing raw sewage to back up onto Ventura Boulevard in Encino. "I took the cover off the manhole and it was full of rats--there must have been 200 of them," Thacker said. The rats scattered and, undaunted, he climbed down and cleaned out the sewer line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1987 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
Calling it "one of the worst" cases his office has seen, Los Angeles City Atty. James K. Hahn on Tuesday filed 130 misdemeanor charges against the former owners of a Sun Valley plating company accused of illegally dumping cyanide and other dangerous chemicals into the city sewer system. Lawrence Russell Horton, 66, of Tarzana, former president of All Valley Plating Co. Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time Roy Parrino held his breath and was lowered into a dark, dank sewer line, he emerged with a two-carat topaz ring, which his wife wears to this day. But unexpected discoveries of jewelry are the only glamorous perks in Parrino's job as a sewage maintenance worker who helps care for the labyrinth of waste-laden pipes beneath Orange County. Otherwise, it's a thankless job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time Roy Parrino held his breath and was lowered into a dark, dank sewer line, he emerged with a two-carat topaz ring, which his wife wears to this day. But unexpected discoveries of jewelry are the only glamorous perks in Parrino's job as a sewage maintenance worker who helps care for the labyrinth of waste-laden pipes beneath Orange County. Otherwise, it's a thankless job.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John McCormick remembers his baptism. Sixty feet below Los Angeles, he hunkered low as he waded through a river of raw sewage in the labyrinth of cramped tunnels, pipes and waste-water conduits that crisscross the city's insides like dirty veins. As his flashlight beam pierced the roiling, pitch-black netherworld, he slipped on a patch of slime and fell into the muck--up to his neck. McCormick, 54, has seen whole crews go down like dazed dominoes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1990 | LUCY CHABOT and JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The first thing foreman John Boos did was say a quick prayer Monday morning when he heard over the citizens band radio that a dirt wall had collapsed, trapping two of his construction workers 30 feet underground. He jumped into his dusty truck and began a worry-filled dash about a mile down Coast Highway to where rescuers working in the buried trench were trying to dig the victims out by hand. Both men, who were buried up to their necks, were freed about an hour after the 9:40 a.m. accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1988 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER, Times Staff Writer
Working in the city's sewers is not a job for the squeamish. Ask William P. Thacker, who earns a living in and around the labyrinth of waste water pipes beneath the San Fernando Valley. One day, Thacker got an emergency call: A grease clog was causing raw sewage to back up onto Ventura Boulevard in Encino. "I took the cover off the manhole and it was full of rats--there must have been 200 of them," Thacker said. The rats scattered and, undaunted, he climbed down and cleaned out the sewer line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1988 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER, Times Staff Writer
Working in the city's sewers is not a job for the squeamish. Ask William P. Thacker, who earns a living in and around sewers in the western San Fernando Valley. One day, Thacker got an emergency call: a grease clog was causing raw sewage to back up onto Ventura Boulevard in Encino. "I took the cover off the manhole and it was full of rats--there must have been 200 of them," Thacker said. The rats scattered and, undaunted, Thacker climbed down the manhole and cleaned out the sewer line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1987 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
Calling it "one of the worst" cases his office has seen, Los Angeles City Atty. James K. Hahn on Tuesday filed 130 misdemeanor charges against the former owners of a Sun Valley plating company accused of illegally dumping cyanide and other dangerous chemicals into the city sewer system. Lawrence Russell Horton, 66, of Tarzana, former president of All Valley Plating Co. Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time Roy Parrino held his breath and was lowered into a dark, dank sewer line, he emerged with a two-carat topaz ring, which his wife wears to this day. But as a sewage maintenance worker who helps care for the labyrinth of waste-laden pipes beneath Orange County, discoveries of unexpected jewelry are the only glamorous perks in Parrino's career. Otherwise, it's a thankless job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1990 | LUCY CHABOT and JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The first thing foreman John Boos did was say a quick prayer Monday morning when he heard over the citizens band radio that a dirt wall had collapsed, trapping two of his construction workers 30 feet underground. He jumped into his dusty truck and began a worry-filled dash about a mile down Coast Highway to where rescuers working in the buried trench were trying to dig the victims out by hand. Both men, who were buried up to their necks, were freed about an hour after the 9:40 a.m. accident.
NEWS
February 28, 1986 | United Press International
A London borough Thursday banned the use of the word manhole on the grounds it is sexist and ordered sewer workers to use the term access chambers. "It is our policy to use non-sexist language. The word manhole clearly defies it," said a spokesman for the Hackney borough council in east London. "It is an insult to women. Why not call them womenholes?" he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1985 | LENORE LOOK, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Department of Public Works severed and capped the sewer pipe of a Glassell Park jewelry recycling center Monday for allegedly dumping extremely high concentrations of cyanide into the sewer system. Rafidain Refinery Inc. at 3060 Roswell St. was found to be dumping up to 800 milligrams of cyanide per liter of water, the highest concentration of the chemical ever found in the city's sewers, according to a spokeswoman for the city's Department of Public Works.
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