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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Last December, Mayor Tom Bradley made headlines when he "ordered" a temporary ban on hosing of driveways and other wasteful uses of water to protect the outdated Los Angeles sewers from overflowing. In the three months since then, new construction has nudged the city's sewer system even closer to collapse, and still no water conservation controls have been imposed on Los Angeles residents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
A judge has dismissed a legal challenge by North Hollywood activist Ivan Shinkle and the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn. to a fee on users of the city of Los Angeles' sewer service. Shinkle and the taxpayer group had claimed that the fee, which totaled $50 million and has been used to bail out shortfalls in the city budget, violated Proposition 218, which requires voter approval of new property-based taxes and fees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987
New large buildings in Los Angeles and in more than 20 other cities that use the Los Angeles sewer system should provide their own sewage treatment, City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky said Friday. He introduced a motion requiring that new buildings of more than 80,000 square feet be equipped with facilities to treat the waste before it enters sewers. This would help reduce the load on the trouble-prone Los Angeles sewer system, Yaroslavsky said. The motion will be considered early next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public works officials leading a massive effort to repair quake-damaged sewer lines across Los Angeles say they have uncovered nearly twice as much damage as originally estimated, requiring an additional $53 million and up to three more years of work. As originally proposed, the $147-million repair project was already described by officials as the largest sewer repair program in the city's history. The project will now cost $200 million, all paid for with federal funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The operation was a success. The tiny, remote-control video camera had made its way through the newly installed plastic tubing, fabricated of advanced materials formulated especially for this purpose. A technician watched a video screen as he guided the camera. At previously determined intervals, a motorized cutting device precisely carved holes in the plastic to let liquids flow through. Was it the latest in high-tech surgery? Not quite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1999 | PATRICK McGREEVY
A judge has dismissed a legal challenge by North Hollywood activist Ivan Shinkle and the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn. to a fee on users of the city of Los Angeles' sewer service. Shinkle and the taxpayer group had claimed that the fee, which totaled $50 million and has been used to bail out shortfalls in the city budget, violated Proposition 218, which requires voter approval of new property-based taxes and fees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The operation was a success. The tiny, remote-control video camera had made its way through the newly installed plastic tubing, fabricated of advanced materials formulated especially for this purpose. A technician watched a video screen as he guided the camera carefully. At previously determined intervals, a motorized cutting device precisely carved holes in the plastic to let liquids flow through. Was it the latest in high-tech surgery? Not quite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public works officials leading a massive effort to repair quake-damaged sewer lines across Los Angeles say they have uncovered nearly twice as much damage as originally estimated, requiring an additional $53 million and up to three more years of work. As originally proposed, the $147-million repair project was already described by officials as the largest sewer repair program in the city's history. The project will now cost $200 million, all paid for with federal funds.
NEWS
October 13, 1985
Dogged by complaints and fines resulting from its aging sewers, the Los Angeles City Council has tentatively approved two motions that would upgrade parts of the system. The council voted unanimously to spend $1.6 million to build four 250,000-gallon sewage overflow tanks in Culver City by June, 1986, that would prevent the summer leakage of raw sewage into Ballona Creek, which empties into the Pacific Ocean near Marina del Rey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1992
Pollution fines levied more than a year ago will fund an outdoor education program in the Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Area that will be offered to nearly 1,000 Los Angeles schoolchildren during the next year, the National Audubon Society has announced. The pilot program will include classroom instruction and field trips to the 108-acre refuge near Burbank Boulevard and the San Diego Freeway that is a resting place for Canada geese and other migratory birds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The operation was a success. The tiny, remote-control video camera had made its way through the newly installed plastic tubing, fabricated of advanced materials formulated especially for this purpose. A technician watched a video screen as he guided the camera. At previously determined intervals, a motorized cutting device precisely carved holes in the plastic to let liquids flow through. Was it the latest in high-tech surgery? Not quite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The operation was a success. The tiny, remote-control video camera had made its way through the newly installed plastic tubing, fabricated of advanced materials formulated especially for this purpose. A technician watched a video screen as he guided the camera carefully. At previously determined intervals, a motorized cutting device precisely carved holes in the plastic to let liquids flow through. Was it the latest in high-tech surgery? Not quite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Last December, Mayor Tom Bradley made headlines when he "ordered" a temporary ban on hosing of driveways and other wasteful uses of water to protect the outdated Los Angeles sewers from overflowing. In the three months since then, new construction has nudged the city's sewer system even closer to collapse, and still no water conservation controls have been imposed on Los Angeles residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987
New large buildings in Los Angeles and in more than 20 other cities that use the Los Angeles sewer system should provide their own sewage treatment, City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky said Friday. He introduced a motion requiring that new buildings of more than 80,000 square feet be equipped with facilities to treat the waste before it enters sewers. This would help reduce the load on the trouble-prone Los Angeles sewer system, Yaroslavsky said. The motion will be considered early next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1988
The Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation has stopped monitoring sewer discharges from a Harbor Gateway furniture manufacturing company that had been dumping illegal amounts of hazardous materials into city sewers. The Los Angeles Board of Public Works approved the move on Wednesday after sanitation officials reported that Virco Manufacturing Corp., 15134 S. Vermont Ave., had "demonstrated the ability to provide long-term compliance with city discharge standards."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1986
A Chatsworth manufacturer of computer parts has been caught dumping hazardous wastes into sewers, the Los Angeles city attorney's office said Thursday. The firm's owner said the materials leaked out of the plant without his knowledge. In a raid Wednesday morning at Circuit Manufacturing Inc., a maker of computer-circuit boards, authorities "caught workers red-handed," City Atty. James K. Hahn said in a prepared statement.
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