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Sewing Machines

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1992 | ROSE KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the third time in five months, burglars punched through the wall of a bottled-water company to get to a clothing manufacturing plant, an owner said Thursday. Police, who arrested one suspect, said the thieves probably sought the portable sewing machines used by B & T Manufacturing in the 11550 block of Salinaz Drive. Ken Behm, vice president of Paradise Drinking Water next door, said the burglars cut through his aluminum back door to enter the building Wednesday night.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping may or may not have actually said "to get rich is glorious," but his country acted as if he did, pushing China to the first rank of global financial players. The Chinese economic miracle, however, came at a wrenching human cost, one that is beautifully explored in an exceptional documentary called "Last Train Home. " Directed by Chinese-born Lixin Fan, "Last Train" takes its name and its overall framework from Chinese migrant workers who toil for most of the year at factories far from their home villages.
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WORLD
November 25, 2008 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Fleishman is a Times staff writer.
He was a boy when a Greek taught him the intricacies of the sewing machine. What was his name, that Greek? Yani Defarkas. Nice man, steady hands. That long time ago is mentioned the way a gray-haired man recalls how the job he took in his youth gradually became who he was. Kind of like thread, spooling, raveling. One day you're a kid with pricked fingers, the next you're an old guy with tweezers and a magnifying glass tinkering with the gadgetry of progress.
WORLD
June 6, 2010
These are some of the goods that Israel allows or bans for shipment to Gaza. The Israeli military does not publish the full list, but the Israeli advocacy group Gisha, which has challenged the restrictions in court, and other groups have compiled their own based on the experiences of aid groups and merchants. ALLOWED Fuel (in limited amounts) Flour, yeast, sugar, cooking oil Rice, pasta Canned or frozen meat or fish Other canned food except fruit Cinnamon, garlic, salt Kidney beans Shoes Wood for door frames/windows Pesticides Candles Diapers, feminine hygiene products Combs, shampoo, toothbrushes Plastic buckets RESTRICTED OR BANNED Cement, plaster Wood for construction Irrigation pipes Vinegar Fresh meat Canned fruit, fruit juice, dried fruit Jam, chocolate, cookies Sewing machines Donkeys, goats, horses Pens, pencils Coriander, cilantro, sage Empty flowerpots Notebooks, some sizes of paper French fries, potato chips Fabric for clothing Plastic toys Empty cans Musical instruments Fishing rods and nets Source: Gisha
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | E. J. GONG JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, under the cover of night, thieves have burrowed through walls, smashed windows and cut wrought-iron fences to get their hands on valuable, albeit unglamorous, prizes: industrial sewing machines. Smaller than a loaf of bread, the machines can yield $4,000 on the streets of Los Angeles. Recently, however, a bolder and potentially deadly method has evolved, worrying store owners and surprising police with its audacity.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the gunfire ended, Yong Whan Chin lay dead on the floor of his Downtown business, an apparent robbery victim in an escalating wave of violence against Southern California garment shop owners, authorities say. Chin's March 16 slaying shocked local garment manufacturers, who police say are being targeted by international crime rings profiting from a multimillion-dollar trade in stolen industrial sewing machines worth up to $6,000 each.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Singer to Go Public: The company that makes Singer sewing machines is going public again, two years after International Semi-Tech Microelectronics Inc. of Toronto bought it. About 15.5 million shares in SSMC Inc. will be sold at a price of $14 to $16 a share. Proceeds will be used to retire debt incurred in the 1989 buyout.
WORLD
June 6, 2010
These are some of the goods that Israel allows or bans for shipment to Gaza. The Israeli military does not publish the full list, but the Israeli advocacy group Gisha, which has challenged the restrictions in court, and other groups have compiled their own based on the experiences of aid groups and merchants. ALLOWED Fuel (in limited amounts) Flour, yeast, sugar, cooking oil Rice, pasta Canned or frozen meat or fish Other canned food except fruit Cinnamon, garlic, salt Kidney beans Shoes Wood for door frames/windows Pesticides Candles Diapers, feminine hygiene products Combs, shampoo, toothbrushes Plastic buckets RESTRICTED OR BANNED Cement, plaster Wood for construction Irrigation pipes Vinegar Fresh meat Canned fruit, fruit juice, dried fruit Jam, chocolate, cookies Sewing machines Donkeys, goats, horses Pens, pencils Coriander, cilantro, sage Empty flowerpots Notebooks, some sizes of paper French fries, potato chips Fabric for clothing Plastic toys Empty cans Musical instruments Fishing rods and nets Source: Gisha
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1986
President Reagan has pointed a new way for me to live high on the hog. All I need do is purchase assets on credit and then sell them off and pocket the money without paying off the loans. That's exactly his proposition in selling off federal properties. But I can't entirely agree with your editorials (Feb. 6), "Now for the Hard Part" and "Look Before You Leap," either. Most all government expenditures result in subsidies to some at the expense of others. The greatest subsidy of all is the money spent for national defense simply because those expenditures subsidize our American economy.
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | DOUG SMITH
Nineteen women of the Glendale Auxiliary to Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles got through the earthquake Monday with only a couple of startled exclamations and hardly a moment's distraction. They were gathering, just when the quake struck, in the Verdugo Room on the ninth floor of the Casa de la Paloma retirement home on Kenwood Avenue. They came to play bridge, canasta and bingo. Though the building swayed and bounced, they were not deterred. As soon as all was still, they distributed themselves at the gaming tables--two card tables for bridge, one for canasta and a conference table for bingo.
WORLD
November 25, 2008 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Fleishman is a Times staff writer.
He was a boy when a Greek taught him the intricacies of the sewing machine. What was his name, that Greek? Yani Defarkas. Nice man, steady hands. That long time ago is mentioned the way a gray-haired man recalls how the job he took in his youth gradually became who he was. Kind of like thread, spooling, raveling. One day you're a kid with pricked fingers, the next you're an old guy with tweezers and a magnifying glass tinkering with the gadgetry of progress.
NEWS
September 19, 2002 | JANET EASTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Poor Hester Prynne. She probably wouldn't like the speed and ease with which a new sewing machine can crank out a scarlet letter A, but Anaheim Angel fans and home embroiderers may. Bernina's Arista 200e, which arrives in stores this week, is the first sewing and embroidery system powered by Microsoft Windows. Touch the keyboard on the built-in screen and you'll see letters--in various fonts and from seven alphabets--duplicated onto fabric faster than by any other home craft machine.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jerry Seinfeld, Dick Van Dyke, Mary Tyler Moore, Steve Martin, Mel Brooks, Richard Belzer, Joy Behar, Ray Romano and Rob Reiner pay tribute to legendary funny man Carl Reiner on the two-hour PBS special "The Kennedy Center Presents: The Mark Twain Prize," which airs Wednesday night on KCET and KVCR. Taped last October at a black-tie event in Washington, D.C.
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pat McCully's Huntington Beach home has been taken over by her relief efforts to help the poor in the impoverished village of Jinotega in northern Nicaragua. Her life has been taken over too. Barely a week after tropical storm Mitch caused mudslides and flooding in the region earlier this month, McCully's kitchen and living room overflowed with boxes of medicine, bedding and other supplies to be shipped to disaster victims. Donated sleeping bags and tarps spilled onto the front porch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1998 | MASSIE RITSCH
A Ventura clothing manufacturer lost about $70,000 worth of high-end sewing equipment in a burglary over the weekend, police said. Alba's Garment Works, 3007 Bunsen Ave., was broken into through a next-door business between 5 p.m. Sunday and 7 a.m. Monday, police said. Authorities said the thieves took 19 of the company's 100 sewing machines, some worth as much as $6,200.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | ROBERT J. LOPEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the gunfire ended, Yong Whan Chin lay dead on the floor of his Downtown business, an apparent robbery victim in an escalating wave of violence against Southern California garment shop owners, authorities say. Chin's March 16 slaying shocked local garment manufacturers, who police say are being targeted by international crime rings profiting from a multimillion-dollar trade in stolen industrial sewing machines worth up to $6,000 each.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | JOHN MORELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; John Morell writes frequently for The Times
Soon after the Northridge earthquake, some of the families left homeless received a colorful handcrafted quilt. "It may not be much, but a quilt has a lot of meaning behind it," said Hannah Meottel of Encino, one of the founders of Quilters for Others. "People can recognize the work and effort it takes to make a good quilt. They see the love that goes into it."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping may or may not have actually said "to get rich is glorious," but his country acted as if he did, pushing China to the first rank of global financial players. The Chinese economic miracle, however, came at a wrenching human cost, one that is beautifully explored in an exceptional documentary called "Last Train Home. " Directed by Chinese-born Lixin Fan, "Last Train" takes its name and its overall framework from Chinese migrant workers who toil for most of the year at factories far from their home villages.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | JOHN MORELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; John Morell writes frequently for The Times
Soon after the Northridge earthquake, some of the families left homeless received a colorful handcrafted quilt. "It may not be much, but a quilt has a lot of meaning behind it," said Hannah Meottel of Encino, one of the founders of Quilters for Others. "People can recognize the work and effort it takes to make a good quilt. They see the love that goes into it."
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | E. J. GONG JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, under the cover of night, thieves have burrowed through walls, smashed windows and cut wrought-iron fences to get their hands on valuable, albeit unglamorous, prizes: industrial sewing machines. Smaller than a loaf of bread, the machines can yield $4,000 on the streets of Los Angeles. Recently, however, a bolder and potentially deadly method has evolved, worrying store owners and surprising police with its audacity.
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