Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSex Crimes United States
IN THE NEWS

Sex Crimes United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 9, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the past decade, state after state has moved to crack down on repeat sex criminals. And no wonder: Usually a horrendous crime has pointed to the need for a change in the law. The kidnapping and murder of 11-year-old Polly Klaas by career criminal Richard Allen Davis spurred passage of California's "three strikes, you're out" law in 1994.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1996 | ED BOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The U.S. Supreme Court recently heard arguments on a Kansas case that may affect a California law created to deal with repeat sexual offenders who have completed their prison sentences. The Kansas law is similar to California's sexual predator law--passed this year--that allows the state to confine repeat sexual offenders in a mental institution until they have been rehabilitated. Critics of the laws say they punish an individual for a crime that has not happened yet.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1996 | ED BOND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The U.S. Supreme Court recently heard arguments on a Kansas case that may affect a California law created to deal with repeat sexual offenders who have completed their prison sentences. The Kansas law is similar to California's sexual predator law--passed this year--that allows the state to confine repeat sexual offenders in a mental institution until they have been rehabilitated. Critics of the laws say they punish an individual for a crime that has not happened yet.
NEWS
December 9, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the past decade, state after state has moved to crack down on repeat sex criminals. And no wonder: Usually a horrendous crime has pointed to the need for a change in the law. The kidnapping and murder of 11-year-old Polly Klaas by career criminal Richard Allen Davis spurred passage of California's "three strikes, you're out" law in 1994.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|