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Sex Discrimination Women

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SPORTS
May 6, 1992 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
At first glance, it looks like all the other banners hanging on the walls of the Estancia High School gym--red background, gold trim, Eagle mascot in the middle. Another patch of school pride, sewn by success. But it's the inscription-- Beach Cities League, 1974 --that makes this banner significant. Not just for Estancia Coach Lillian Brabander, whose all-girl badminton team won it nearly two decades ago, but for the generation of high school girls who have played sports since.
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SPORTS
May 6, 1992 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
At first glance, it looks like all the other banners hanging on the walls of the Estancia High School gym--red background, gold trim, Eagle mascot in the middle. Another patch of school pride, sewn by success. But it's the inscription-- Beach Cities League, 1974 --that makes this banner significant. Not just for Estancia Coach Lillian Brabander, whose all-girl badminton team won it nearly two decades ago, but for the generation of high school girls who have played sports since.
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NEWS
February 17, 1985
A federal judge has ruled that Oregon's state colleges and universities did not engage in a pattern of widespread sex discrimination against women faculty members. U.S. District Judge Helen Frye rejected all but three of the 58 discrimination claims by 22 named plaintiffs in a class-action suit brought against the Oregon Board of Higher Education. The suit sought $33.1 million in back pay, plus legal costs, for 2,200 faculty women at the eight state schools.
OPINION
June 2, 1991 | BARBARA BOXER and DON EDWARDS, Rep. Barbara Boxer (D-Greenbrae) is a member of the executive committee of the congressional caucus for women's issues. Rep. Don Edwards (D-San Jose) is chairman of the House subcommittee on civil and constitutional rights
Jacqueline Morris endured an extended campaign of sexual harassment that ultimately led her to resign her job as a senior machinist. Her supervisors repeatedly touched her body inappropriately and made sexual remarks to her in front of other employees. Her co-workers routinely placed sexually explicit pictures and objects at her work station. They tampered with and stole her equipment. On one occasion, a urine-like substance was placed in the air line of her compressor.
NEWS
December 27, 1998 | BEATA PASEK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Her male colleagues read newspapers when she first spoke at government meetings, so Industry Minister Henryka Bochniarz decided she'd have to seize their attention. She sharply criticized another Cabinet minister's talk and the men put their papers down, Bochniarz, now a business consultant and president of the Polish Business Council, recalls with a smile.
NEWS
June 13, 1999 | KYONG-HWA SEOK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Kim Na-na married a co-worker at Korea Chemical Co. last October, she knew her job was at stake. She was violating the company's tradition of not employing married women. The 25-year-old worker was let go soon after she returned from a weeklong honeymoon. Her husband, Chung Moon-soon, 33, was forced to resign after strongly protesting the firing. Both are now jobless.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mr. Feldman's eighth-grade algebra class has been working on a single problem for close to 10 minutes. It is a difficult problem with several possible answers, but the students are not discouraged. Can X equal -1? How about +1? If X is zero, then what is its square root? And . . . isn't that Mozart? In Abe Feldman's math classes, there is always music.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
More than a year before the 1992 presidential campaign officially gets under way, Democratic strategists are struggling to find a way to keep the divisive issue of affirmative action from hurting their drive to regain the White House. "The controversy over affirmative action and quotas could become the GOP's point issue, the Willie Horton of 1992," warns Mark Siegel, a veteran of Democratic presidential campaigns since 1972.
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