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NEWS
September 16, 1990 | MALCOLM GLADWELL, THE WASHINGTON POST
It is a safe bet that few women ever wanted to mother Clint Eastwood. The steely, narrowed eyes. The rugged jawline. The thin-lipped sneer. This is the face of a man to save the homestead from marauding Indians, to stare down an outlaw in a saloon. But not to cuddle. Now, take Paul McCartney--he of the doe eyes, chipmunk cheeks and teddy bear chin. Ten thousand teeny-boppers can't be wrong. The man is adorable.
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SCIENCE
November 13, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Maugh is a Times staff writer.
Heart transplant patients are as much as 25% more likely to survive if the sex of the donor is the same as the patient's, researchers said Wednesday. The results surprised experts because, for most types of transplants, sex differences are irrelevant as long as a good immunocompatability is achieved.
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SPORTS
November 19, 1988 | Associated Press
A 1966 World Championships gold medal in the women's downhill may be retroactively awarded to former French skier Marielle Goitschel because the winner turned out to be a man, a skiing official said Friday. Erika Schinegger of Austria, who won the gold medal at Portillo, Chile, discovered during medical tests later in her career that she was in fact a man, according to a new autobiography.
HEALTH
May 19, 2008 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
For THOSE who have poured themselves a stiff cocktail at the end of an awful day -- or a spat, traffic ticket or office crisis -- it's official: You are likely trying to distract yourself from negative emotions. And if this is how you tend to respond, you're more likely to be a man than a woman. A Yale University study finds that under stress, women report more sadness and anxiety than men, but men report more craving for alcohol.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The following letter arrived recently, signed by Barbara Young and seven other "Ladies of the Office." The tone was anger. As other office ladies were watching a "soap" during lunch, several commercials ran for yeast infections and feminine products (including one that asked if we ruin our panties every month when we get our period), and I thought to myself about commercials I have seen very recently regarding birth control protection for women, particularly sponge or foam products.
HEALTH
May 19, 2008 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
For THOSE who have poured themselves a stiff cocktail at the end of an awful day -- or a spat, traffic ticket or office crisis -- it's official: You are likely trying to distract yourself from negative emotions. And if this is how you tend to respond, you're more likely to be a man than a woman. A Yale University study finds that under stress, women report more sadness and anxiety than men, but men report more craving for alcohol.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There may be no more idyllic spot in all of higher education than Middlebury College. Students here boast, with little exaggeration, that they select their rooms based on whether they want to gaze upon the Green Mountains to the east or the Adirondacks in the west. Filled with majestic, Colonial buildings of white marble and pale gray limestone, the campus is quintessentially New England--with the exception of its flashy sports facilities.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | CONNIE KOENENN, Times Staff Writer
It was an unusual move for Westwood's Sisterhood Bookstore to invite sociologist Cynthia Fuchs Epstein to be a recent guest author. Bookstore guests usually promote popular fiction or major biographies. But Epstein is an academic, and her new book, "Deceptive Distinctions: Sex, Gender and the Social Order" (Yale University Press), is a heavy-duty look at the last two decades of research on the changing roles of men and women in American society.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling that could encourage more women to file sexual harassment charges, a federal appeals court in San Francisco took a swipe Wednesday at "male-biased" legal standards, adopting a novel "reasonable woman" perspective for judging harassment cases. "The judge acknowledged that the existing (legal) theories and perspectives are male-influenced," said Susan Rubenstein, a San Francisco attorney who specializes in sexual harassment and civil rights cases.
NEWS
November 8, 1987 | JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writer
Once a month when the Legislature is in session, a group of Sacramento's most powerful lobbyists meets privately for lunch at a popular Chinese restaurant near the state Capitol--and the only men allowed are the waiters. All 30 or so of the lobbyists are women, some of them with six-figure salaries who represent blue-chip clients. Women legislators, whose votes the lobbyists seek to influence, also attend the luncheons.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A prominent feminist, allied with the presidential campaign of former Sen. John Edwards, accused Democratic front-runner Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton on Saturday of "disingenuously playing the victim card" by infusing her campaign with messages about gender. "When unchallenged, in a comfortable, controlled situation, Sen.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2007 | Glenn Thrush, Newsday
Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.) mocked Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) on Friday for having played the gender card, saying she cried "Don't pick on me" after being attacked by her foes on legitimate policy issues at this week's debate among Democratic presidential contenders.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2007 | Glenn Thrush, Newsday
Hillary Rodham Clinton, playing the gender card after a serious campaign stumble, suggested Thursday that she is being singled out as a woman in an otherwise male presidential field. "In so many ways, this all-women's college prepared me to compete in the all-boys club of presidential politics," Sen. Clinton (D-N.Y.) said during a speech at her alma mater Wellesley College in Massachusetts.
WORLD
March 16, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Spain signed equality between the sexes into law, enforcing better working opportunities for women and giving men better child-care rights. The law calls for women to make up at least 40% of company boards and electoral lists and says neither women nor men should make up more than 60% of either. The new legislation also gives men 15 days of paternity leave with the aim of increasing that to a month.
SCIENCE
February 10, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
For women, apparently there's nothing like the smell of a man's sweat. Researchers at UC Berkeley said women who sniffed a chemical found in male sweat, called androstadienone, experienced elevated levels of an important hormone, along with higher sexual arousal, faster heart rate and other effects. The study -- published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience -- is the first direct evidence that people secrete a scent that influences the hormones of the opposite sex, the researchers said.
REAL ESTATE
December 3, 2006 | Gayle Pollard-Terry
It's not just an old wives' tale. Women do feel cold more quickly than men and generally feel colder longer. Researchers attribute the difference to size. The smaller you are, the colder you will be, at least in theory, because you shed heat faster than a much larger person. Scientists also report that men typically have more muscle mass, which generates heat. And women tend to have colder hands than men, according to a study from the University of Utah Medical School.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are those who pity the world's scientists, believing them to be anchored to their microscopes and missing all life's fun. These people have not met Marlene Zuk. Zuk is an evolutionary biologist. But what she really does is watch wild fowl mate. "It sounds pretty crazy, doesn't it?" said Zuk, 35, a professor at the tree-studded University of California campus in Riverside. "Here I am with my Ph.D. and I'm watching chickens have sex." There is, of course, a noble purpose to this voyeurism.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Congratulations! It's not every day that you're part of something historic. "This is the first-ever televised sex-change operation in talk-show history as far as we know," Geraldo Rivera announced at the start of Monday's episode of his 4 p.m. hour on KCBS-TV Channel 2. Even more significant, this is the first-ever column about the response of a columnist's mother and mother-in-law to the first-ever oversold, overblown, overcooked, televised sex-change operation in talk-show history.
NATIONAL
September 10, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Amid boos and shouts of "traitors," Randolph-Macon Woman's College officials announced that men would be admitted to the 115-year-old Lynchburg institution starting in 2007. Some 400 students, alumnae and their supporters greeted the board's announcement by drowning out trustees President Jolley Christman as she tried to explain.
HEALTH
July 17, 2006 | From Times wire reports
Cigarette-smoking women run twice the risk of lung cancer as men who smoke but are far less likely to die from the disease than males, a new study says. Why women are more susceptible to the cancer-causing agents in cigarette smoke is not clear, the report said, but the findings indicate that women who smoke should be screened sooner and targeted with anti-smoking messages earlier.
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