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Sex Gender

NEWS
May 30, 2000 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After watching men colonize cyberspace, in the last two years women have populated it. In February for the first time, more women than men surfed the Web. Why then is it so difficult to frame a successful online business around women? IVillage and Women.com--the most popular and the only publicly traded companies among such ventures--have seen their stocks go into free fall recently, placing them among Wall Street's basket cases in a fickle dot-com marketplace.
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NEWS
May 11, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The once-yawning gender gap in cyberspace among U.S. consumers has closed, according to a study to be released today. Drawn by the communications flexibility of e-mail as well as burgeoning opportunities for shopping and entertainment, more than 9 million women went online for the first time in the last six months, according to a study by the Washington-based Pew Research Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2000 | VINCE KOWALICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although most California State University campuses have achieved compliance with a 1993 agreement on gender equity in athletics, Cal State Northridge is among a handful of schools lagging behind, according to a report released Tuesday. Still, representatives of the California National Organization for Women were pleased with the CSU report showing significant increases systemwide in participation, funding and grants for women's sports.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2000 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Internet's days as a male-dominated club likely will end during the coming year as more women move online, according to results of a study being released today by a Seattle-based research firm. Women accounted for 49% of Internet users during the fourth quarter of 1999, up from 43% in the first quarter of 1998, according to AdRelevance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2000 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new study by the San Francisco advocacy group Children Now, analyzing the diversity of casts on network drama and comedy series, found that while most prime-time shows include some multicultural characters, men are twice as visible as women; Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans or characters with disabilities barely exist; and any racial component largely disappears in the opening credits.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
To anyone who has ever tried to plan a vacation, pick a movie or choose between the rake and the hammock on a Saturday afternoon, it may not come as news that men and women occasionally disagree. In politics, this instinct has manifested itself most famously in the gender gap--the tendency of women to favor Democrats and men Republicans in presidential and congressional elections.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An award-winning teacher banned from the classroom after revealing plans to undergo a sex change operation has resigned in exchange for a $150,000 settlement, officials at a suburban school district here announced Monday. David Warfield, a teacher at Center High School since 1990, revealed in May that he intended to become Dana Rivers. But the 44-year-old teacher never returned to school this year because trustees voted in August to fire Rivers for discussing the sex change with students.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baby boys are not wanted here--statistically speaking, at least. In a stunning repudiation of the traditional Asian values that for centuries have put a premium on producing male heirs, surveys show that up to 75% of young Japanese parents now prefer baby girls. Daughters are seen as cuter, easier to handle, more emotionally accessible and, ever more important in this fast-aging society, more likely to look after their elderly parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1999
From the Males are from Mars, Females are from Venus files: A chemical messenger in the brain that makes males mellow out has exactly the opposite effect in females, according to mouse studies from Johns Hopkins University. The compound is a neurotransmitter called nitric oxide. Psychologist Stephen Gammie and his colleagues produced transgenic mice that have a defective system for producing nitric oxide.
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