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Sexism

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno said, "I hope to do the women of America proud." That, gentlemen, is sexism! JOHN A. SELEINE Seal Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Ladies, if you're wondering how to use that sexism card you swore off in the 1970s after you got liberated, I suggest you take a look at the masterful performance of one Jennifer Stefano, a regional director of the Obamacare-hating, Koch brothers-funded Americans for Prosperity. She appeared as a guest on Chris Hayes' MSNBC program "All In" Wednesday night to talk, ostensibly, about AFP's objection to the two-week Obamacare deadline extension. The conversation quickly devolved into a one-sided screaming match, with Stefano working herself into the kind of tizzy any parent of a teenager would recognize as phony.
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OPINION
June 14, 2013
Re "Everybody's boy problem," Opinion, June 11 We read that males mature much slower than females do; we are informed males are doing much more poorly in school than are females; and we are told that this poor male performance "drags down the overall competitiveness" of the American workforce. Truly? Why was this "overall drag down" never discussed when females were forbidden full educations and jobs other than the most menial? The glaring omission in Thomas A. DiPrete and Claudia Buchmann's article is that sexism is now biting males in the butt, since the male attitude of "I want what I want when I want it" no longer works as well as it once did, even though men still earn more money than women do in identical jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
The idea seemed crazy at first: More than 500 knitters from 25 countries, hunkered down in their far-flung corners of the world, feverishly crafting granny squares - 14,000 of them altogether. Then, on a bright morning last May, knitters here affixed metal grids of these cushy yarn squares to the exterior of the Craft & Folk Art Museum on Wilshire Boulevard, turning the building into a giant, multicolored tea cozy. The 2013 project, "CAFAM Granny Squared," was an urban installation from the knit graffiti collective Yarn Bombing Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Speaking before a gathering of women in technology, Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg recalled an uncomfortable exchange with two men on a different stage discussing the scarcity of women in the industry. One commented that he would like to hire more young women but not all are as competent as Sandberg. The other said he, too, would hire more young women but his wife fears he would sleep with them and, he confessed, he probably would. Sandberg's husband, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Dave Goldberg, told her later that night that the men did her a favor with their honesty.
NEWS
December 25, 1987
After centuries of abuse, physical and emotional, being denied equal education and opportunity, treated as chattel, (and still so, in some countries, with the condonement of the patriarchal rule), even here women still have to resort to the courts for equitable treatment, hesitate to walk down the streets in most communities due to fear of male assault or crime, and Farrell and others have the audacity to whine about some harmless ribbing? I am not saying that I condone reverse sexism; most women don't.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1989
Concerning the Nov. 26 review of the rap album "Arsenio Hall Presents Chunky A--Large & in Charge": Dennis Hunt writes, "Some women, though, won't be able to see the humor for the sexism." In this one sentence, Hunt makes at least three facile and inappropriate assumptions. 1--Fortunately for all of us, Hunt would not have been able to make the same cavalier comments in this context: "Some blacks won't be able to see the humor for the racism." Hunt and his editors are wrong to assume that offensive and degrading references are generally more acceptable when applied to women.
NEWS
April 30, 1989
Re "Show Biz Softball--Accent the Biz" by Jeff Meyers, April 18: So, according to the league administrators and unnamed "unofficial historians" women just haven't "shown an interest" in the entertainment softball league. There are 42 teams with 700 players who socialize, rub elbows with the power elite and unabashedly promote their careers; but women have never shown an interest in it? I'll tell you how my interest and that of a roomful of industry women was greeted a few years ago. When questioned, a league member at first told us that women were not admitted to the league.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Silicon Valley is wrestling with yet more damaging allegations of harassment and sexism as a prominent engineer accuses her company of creating a hostile work environment that led to her resignation. Julie Ann Horvath, who was a developer with GitHub, made the allegations public on Twitter and in an interview with technology blog TechCrunch over the weekend. GitHub, which has raised $100 million in funding, said Sunday night that it would conduct an investigation into Horvath's claims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Ladies, if you're wondering how to use that sexism card you swore off in the 1970s after you got liberated, I suggest you take a look at the masterful performance of one Jennifer Stefano, a regional director of the Obamacare-hating, Koch brothers-funded Americans for Prosperity. She appeared as a guest on Chris Hayes' MSNBC program "All In" Wednesday night to talk, ostensibly, about AFP's objection to the two-week Obamacare deadline extension. The conversation quickly devolved into a one-sided screaming match, with Stefano working herself into the kind of tizzy any parent of a teenager would recognize as phony.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Silicon Valley is wrestling with yet more damaging allegations of harassment and sexism as a prominent engineer accuses her company of creating a hostile work environment that led to her resignation. Julie Ann Horvath, who was a developer with GitHub, made the allegations public on Twitter and in an interview with technology blog TechCrunch over the weekend. GitHub, which has raised $100 million in funding, said Sunday night that it would conduct an investigation into Horvath's claims.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Speaking before a gathering of women in technology, Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg recalled an uncomfortable exchange with two men on a different stage discussing the scarcity of women in the industry. One commented that he would like to hire more young women but not all are as competent as Sandberg. The other said he, too, would hire more young women but his wife fears he would sleep with them and, he confessed, he probably would. Sandberg's husband, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Dave Goldberg, told her later that night that the men did her a favor with their honesty.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Martin Tsai
"Lost for Words" is an unlikely romance set in Hong Kong between an American on an information-technology assignment and a Chinese ballerina newly arrived to join a dance company. Michael (Sean Faris of "Never Back Down") is an ex-Marine who is emotionally preoccupied because of a separation. The virginal Anna (Grace Huang of "The Man With the Iron Fists") is the product of a strict Catholic upbringing. Even in this megalopolis, the two manage to cross paths three times before their formal introduction.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Emily Keeler
Running on a mere 2½ hours of sleep and exactly 12 hours after winning the Man Booker Prize for her novel “The Luminaries,” Eleanor Catton sat down for an interview with the Guardian's Charlotte Higgins and brought her A game. The 28-year-old novelist from New Zealand, the youngest ever to win the prize, addressed the critics who have approached her complex novel with trite assumptions about gender. Catton said the "people whose negative reaction [to 'The Luminaries']
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By August Brown
The Internet has transformed the ways we find new music and interact with artists. Some of it's been for the better, but a lot of it's been for the worse -- especially for young women in rising acts. Lauren Mayberry, singer of the popular Scottish electro trio Chvrches (who just released their excellent debut LP "The Bones of What You Believe" ), is on the front lines of the ways the Internet enables men to harass women who are in the public eye. She just published a moving op-ed in the British newspaper the Guardian about the real and frightening impact that all of the abuse -- some obnoxious, some overtly threatening -- can inflict.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
A top women's surfer wants Orange County surf clothing company Roxy to stop using sexy images of its sponsored female surfers and instead focus on their athleticism. Three-time world champion surfer Cori Schumacher hoped to send a message by delivering to the Huntington Beach company more than 20,000 signatures from people upset about what they said is the ads' focus on women's bodies instead of their graceful skills in the water. Schumacher said she was upset by what she described as a recent "all sex, no surf" Roxy ad that showed Australian surfer Stephanie Gilmore partially clothed in bed, then showering, as a promotion for a Roxy-sponsored surf contest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1988
State Sen. Marian Bergeson (R-Newport Beach) has come down hard in the print media on sexism in politics. Rightly so. I've never found myself agreeing with Sen. Bergeson on any matter, but I agree with this fine lady on this one. This sexism in politics (picking a female political candidate for sex alone to "balance the ticket") serves no one. Not women, not candidates, not a political party, and not society. I go further than Sen. Bergeson. This tawdry political practice is unabashedly a calloused attempt to quell women's whimpers decrying (as they rightfully do)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Good Wife" meets "Law and Order: U.K. " in "Silk," a six-hour, three-episode series premiering on PBS' "Masterpiece Mystery!" on Sunday night. As host Alan Cumming helpfully explains in the first-night introduction, "Silk" refers to the prestigious position of Queen's Counsel: In British court, these high-ranking barristers wear gowns of silk (also those crazy wig hats). Applying for silk is one Martha Costello (Maxine Peake), a passionate defense barrister who has made the law her life.
OPINION
June 14, 2013
Re "Everybody's boy problem," Opinion, June 11 We read that males mature much slower than females do; we are informed males are doing much more poorly in school than are females; and we are told that this poor male performance "drags down the overall competitiveness" of the American workforce. Truly? Why was this "overall drag down" never discussed when females were forbidden full educations and jobs other than the most menial? The glaring omission in Thomas A. DiPrete and Claudia Buchmann's article is that sexism is now biting males in the butt, since the male attitude of "I want what I want when I want it" no longer works as well as it once did, even though men still earn more money than women do in identical jobs.
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