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Sexual Behavior

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1997
A curriculum stressing sexual abstinence that was widely used in California schools did not change younger teenagers' sexual behavior, a study has found.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Who 'sexts'? And who cares, besides former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner's wife? It turns out that a fair number of people send the cryptic and racy messages, and behavioral scientists who study issues as varied as sexual mores, shame and suicide are curious. Depending on your definition of sexting (Words only? Photos?) and what groups you're surveying, 2.5% to 25% of the population sends them and 7% to 34.5% receives them (some, accidentally). And that's just the folks who admit it. A recent report suggests that almost 40% of young people reported sending such messages, and almost 50% reported receiving them.
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SPORTS
December 6, 1991 | Associated Press
Magic Johnson, who retired from the Lakers last month after disclosing that he was infected with HIV, has signed a contract with Random House to write three books, including his autobiography and a guide to responsible sexual behavior, the publishing firm said Thursday. Retired U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop would collaborate with Johnson on the sexual guide, with proceeds to go to the new Magic Johnson Foundation to support education, care and research in AIDS and related subjects.
SCIENCE
September 6, 2012 | By Monte Morin
Sex: There's an app for that. The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction, along with Indiana University, have released a free smartphone application that allows users to anonymously report on sexual and intimate behavior. The app, which is available to Apple and Android users, is intended to collect previously unreported experiences for the well-known sexual behavior research institute, and make that information available online. “People are natural observers.
HEALTH
January 10, 2005 | From Newsday
Easy access to emergency contraception apparently does not lead women to abandon their usual birth control or put them at increased risk for sexually transmitted disease. In six states, including California, women can obtain emergency contraception in pharmacies without obtaining a prescription from their doctor. Some opponents have argued that easier access to the pills could lead to an increase in promiscuity and sexually transmitted disease.
OPINION
September 29, 1991
The Bush Administration's willingness to allow some conservatives to exercise a veto power over public health policy puts many Americans at risk. Federal health officials have been pressured into cutting off research grants for two major federally funded surveys on human sexual behavior--even though the data collected could help shield millions of people from sexually related health problems, including AIDS. Chanting the mantra of abstinence and chastity, Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) and Rep.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Pope John Paul II, visiting a region ravaged by AIDS, said today that the disease must be treated as both a psychological and medical problem. He stressed a need for changes in sexual behavior. The Pope, who traveled to this tiny, mountainous country on the fifth day of a 10-day African trip, addressed about 75,000 pilgrims at an open-air Mass on a sloping field at Gitega, about 65 miles north of the capital, Bujumbura.
SPORTS
November 9, 1991 | MARK LANDSBAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Magic Johnson's tragedy might shock professional athletes into changing their sexual behavior while teaching the general public an overdue lesson about AIDS, Orange County athletes said Friday. "It has been a major topic of conversation in the locker room," Ram free safety Pat Terrell said after Friday's practice. "Many guys have said they are going to change their ways or at least re-think their ways." Sports agent Leigh Steinberg agreed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1994 | WILLIAM H. DUBAY, William H. DuBay is the author of "Gay Identity, the Self Under Ban" (McFarland and Co.)
When we look at the gay political movement, we see 25 years since the Stonewall riots focused on promoting gay identity. This agenda has focused on "coming out," asking people to publicly identify themselves as homosexuals. It is an agenda aimed not at sexual freedom but defining homosexuals as a minority of persons to be protected against discrimination as defined in statutes. It attempts to cast what is essentially a moral issue as a civil-rights issue. But does this effort succeed?
SCIENCE
November 14, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
The number of newly diagnosed cases of the three most common sexually transmitted diseases rose for the second year in a row in the U.S., driven in part by an increase in risky sexual behavior, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday. "Increases in all three of these STDs. . . underscore the need for vigilance," said Dr. John M. Douglas Jr., director of the CDC's division of STD prevention, which produced the report.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Melissa Healy / Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Forget about rock 'n' roll: When rats are administered the highly addictive stimulant methamphetamine and allowed to engage in sexual behavior while high, all they want is more of both. That's the raw finding of a study published Tuesday by the Journal of Neuroscience. It's important because many who use methamphetamine report that it enhances their sexual experience. But because it also reduces their inhibitions , those abusers are more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior , including unprotected sex and anal intercourse.
HEALTH
May 23, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Tiger Woods' mistresses. Arnold Schwarzenegger's secret child. Bill Clinton's sexual escapades in the Oval Office. Every case of a prominent man risking his family, career and status for extramarital sex raises the question: What were they thinking? Mental health experts wonder this too, and not just because of the cases that make headlines. Each year, thousands of men and women from all walks of life seek psychiatric help for sexual conduct disorders, said doctors gathered here last week at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Assn.
NEWS
October 22, 2010
Pity the poor boy--in the United States at least--wedged in the midst of a bevy of sisters. When he's little, he'll certainly be dressed and made up like a doll. He will doubtless spend time cooling his heels at the bathroom door. He'll likely pine for the attention of his sisters' girlfriends. But a new study confirms what many such boys learned long ago: that as a sexual prospect, the kid brother is chopped liver. If he's a rat, at least. "Does family play a role in shaping the adult phenotype?"
SCIENCE
March 1, 2010
About hypersexual disorder Psychiatrists have proposed adding hypersexual disorder to the next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. A description of the disorder includes having four or more of the following criteria over at least six months. The symptoms must be severe and not caused by something else, such as drug abuse or medication. A great deal of time is consumed by sexual fantasies and urges and by planning for and engaging in sexual behavior.
OPINION
December 7, 2009 | By Sharon M. Scott
In his Nov. 22 Times Op-Ed article, "Monogamy isn't easy, naturally," biologist David P. Barash claims that because monogamy is rare in the animal world, it is therefore unnatural behavior for humans. The logic of the argument is critically flawed. In stating that dedication to a single individual is "against" human nature and that no one is "cut out for monogamy," Barash fails to recognize that the human is unlike any other creature on the planet. Comparing our behavior patterns to birds or animals may, at times, prove helpful in understanding our species, but it should not be used to determine what is and what is not "natural" for humans.
OPINION
December 25, 2008 | Bob Waliszewski, Bob Waliszewski is director of Focus on the Family's www.pluggedinonline.com
This Last weekend, Jim Carrey's "Yes Man" hit movie screens nationwide. Thousands of moms and dads let their teens see it because it was rated PG-13. But Carrey's character, in a rather graphic scene, receives oral sex from a willing elderly woman. It's played for laughs, but it's hardly funny. The Motion Picture Assn. of America, the organization that assigns ratings to movies, has essentially put its stamp of approval on this flick for anyone over the age of 13.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2008 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
After four decades, 10 Emmys, and more than a few flops, Steven Bochco still hasn't figured out what makes a hit television show. "Every show by definition is a shotgun marriage," the producer of "Hill Street Blues," "NYPD Blue" and "L.A. Law" said recently. "You're putting a gun to people's heads and you say, 'OK, you're marrying this material, now learn to love it.' " His latest wedding, “Raising the Bar," will debut Monday on TNT. A legal drama set in the Bronx, the 10-episode series is based on "Indefensible," a book by public defender David Feige.
SCIENCE
November 14, 2007 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
The number of newly diagnosed cases of the three most common sexually transmitted diseases rose for the second year in a row in the U.S., driven in part by an increase in risky sexual behavior, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday. "Increases in all three of these STDs. . . underscore the need for vigilance," said Dr. John M. Douglas Jr., director of the CDC's division of STD prevention, which produced the report.
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