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Sexual Desire

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HEALTH
May 2, 2011 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, HealthKey
A dizzying number of factors can conspire against sexual desire as midlife approaches: depression, medications, illness, career worries, financial pressures, marriage troubles, young children in the home (or an empty nest), the sense that life is half over … and then there's testosterone. Usually we think of testosterone as a hormone that men have — in abundance. But testosterone plays a big role in setting the pace for a woman's sex drive as well. And both men and women experience a natural drop in testosterone that can cause libido to ebb in midlife.
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SCIENCE
April 22, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
It's taken an army of mice (and a group of clever Canadian researchers) to crack open an old sexual chestnut and get at the meat inside: For women, "Not tonight dear, I have a headache" is not a passive-aggressive rebuff to a mate's sexual invitation (not always, at least). It's a biological phenomenon with deep evolutionary roots. Even for females who've never watched a 1950s movie or been schooled in the art of sexual gamesmanship, bodily pain puts a serious damper on sexual desire, new research has revealed.
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SCIENCE
April 22, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
It's taken an army of mice (and a group of clever Canadian researchers) to crack open an old sexual chestnut and get at the meat inside: For women, "Not tonight dear, I have a headache" is not a passive-aggressive rebuff to a mate's sexual invitation (not always, at least). It's a biological phenomenon with deep evolutionary roots. Even for females who've never watched a 1950s movie or been schooled in the art of sexual gamesmanship, bodily pain puts a serious damper on sexual desire, new research has revealed.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Money worries are killing romance right when we need it, on Valentine's Day. The holiday means pricey dinners and sparkly gifts, an outlay of cash -- and added financial stress -- for many Americans. For those wanting to add some romantic sizzle, money worries are a cold shower. PHOTOS: For Valentine's Day, monogamous animals A recent survey shows money-related stress may be snuffing out sexual desire.  A majority of Americans surveyed in the Harris poll, conducted for financial data company Yodlee , thought about money more often than sex -- 62% of those 18 and older.
HEALTH
November 23, 2009 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An experimental non-hormonal drug appears to help women increase their sexual desire and satisfaction -- and reduce the distress associated with lack of desire. About one in 10 women are thought to suffer from sufficient lack of sexual desire for it to be distressing for them. But few good therapeutic options exist. The most common treatments for female sexual dysfunction currently are creams spread on the vagina that lead to engorgement of blood vessels. The results of a new clinical trial, reported Nov. 16, will provide Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals of Germany ammunition to approach the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approval.
HEALTH
January 23, 2012 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Candy hearts and fancy chocolate boxes are showing up in stores, which means many couples are starting to look forward to a special day of ... something other than candy. But even on a holiday devoted to the cause, sexual desire can be hard to come by. Whether it's because of age, illness, stress or distractions, many people feel their spark isn't sparking like it should. Not surprisingly, a lot of would-be romantics turn to herbal remedies for help. "We sell a lot of libido products throughout the year, but we definitely see a spike around Valentine's Day," says Bill Chioffi, director of education for Gaia Herbs, a company in Brevard, N.C., that makes two supplements for the occasion: Women's Libido and Male Libido.
HEALTH
June 28, 2010 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A "little pink pill" to solve women's sexual problems probably won't be hitting drugstore shelves anytime soon. But that doesn't mean discussion of the need for it, or lack thereof, is likely to end. On June 18, an advisory panel for the Food and Drug Administration recommended against the approval of flibanserin, which had been touted as a female Viagra. The FDA can accept or reject the panel's advice but usually chooses to follow it. In many drug approval proceedings, that would be the end of the matter.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A woman's sexual satisfaction does not require high levels of sexual desire--and in fact, does not require sexual activity at all, according to a new study that finds rates of sexual satisfaction highest among the youngest and oldest women it surveyed. A study published Tuesday in the American Journal of Medicine found that in a group of more than 800 women between age 40 and 100, those under 55 and those over 80 were most likely to declare themselves satisfied with their sex lives.
NEWS
March 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Oklahoma Senate passed, 37 to 10, a bill that would make the state the first to allow judges to order surgical castration of sex offenders. The measure, which now goes to the House, would require a positive DNA test linking the offender to the crime. A jury also would have to find aggravating circumstances. Critics said sex crimes are tied to violence, not sexual desire.
NEWS
January 17, 1985 | Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that there is no such thing as a safe and effective over-the-counter aphrodisiac and proposed a ban on the marketing of non-prescription drugs that claim to arouse sexual desire. The FDA issued a formal notice that it is tentatively adopting the conclusions of an advisory board that has been studying the drugs, a preparatory step to issuing a regulation banning them.
HEALTH
January 23, 2012 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Candy hearts and fancy chocolate boxes are showing up in stores, which means many couples are starting to look forward to a special day of ... something other than candy. But even on a holiday devoted to the cause, sexual desire can be hard to come by. Whether it's because of age, illness, stress or distractions, many people feel their spark isn't sparking like it should. Not surprisingly, a lot of would-be romantics turn to herbal remedies for help. "We sell a lot of libido products throughout the year, but we definitely see a spike around Valentine's Day," says Bill Chioffi, director of education for Gaia Herbs, a company in Brevard, N.C., that makes two supplements for the occasion: Women's Libido and Male Libido.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
A woman's sexual satisfaction does not require high levels of sexual desire--and in fact, does not require sexual activity at all, according to a new study that finds rates of sexual satisfaction highest among the youngest and oldest women it surveyed. A study published Tuesday in the American Journal of Medicine found that in a group of more than 800 women between age 40 and 100, those under 55 and those over 80 were most likely to declare themselves satisfied with their sex lives.
HEALTH
May 2, 2011 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, HealthKey
A dizzying number of factors can conspire against sexual desire as midlife approaches: depression, medications, illness, career worries, financial pressures, marriage troubles, young children in the home (or an empty nest), the sense that life is half over … and then there's testosterone. Usually we think of testosterone as a hormone that men have — in abundance. But testosterone plays a big role in setting the pace for a woman's sex drive as well. And both men and women experience a natural drop in testosterone that can cause libido to ebb in midlife.
HEALTH
June 28, 2010 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A "little pink pill" to solve women's sexual problems probably won't be hitting drugstore shelves anytime soon. But that doesn't mean discussion of the need for it, or lack thereof, is likely to end. On June 18, an advisory panel for the Food and Drug Administration recommended against the approval of flibanserin, which had been touted as a female Viagra. The FDA can accept or reject the panel's advice but usually chooses to follow it. In many drug approval proceedings, that would be the end of the matter.
OPINION
June 19, 2010
Pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim doesn't have an approved solution, but that hasn't kept it from marketing the problem. The German firm, which touts its new but as yet unapproved drug flibanserin as a treatment for women with low libido, has sponsored a website about the issue. It sent a soap-opera star on tour to discuss the problem, and, according to the New York Times, sponsored a Discovery Channel show on female sexual disorders and an online course for doctors that included a quiz question about an overworked, stressed middle-aged woman who had lost interest in sex. The "correct" response was for the woman to be evaluated for "hypoactive sexual desire disorder," a severe lack of libido.
NEWS
December 2, 2009 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An experimental non-hormonal drug appears to help women increase their sexual desire and satisfaction -- and reduce the distress associated with lack of desire. About one in 10 women are thought to suffer from sufficient lack of sexual desire for it to be distressing for them. But few good therapeutic options exist. The most common treatments for female sexual dysfunction currently are creams spread on the vagina that lead to engorgement of blood vessels. The results of a new clinical trial, reported Nov. 16, will provide Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals of Germany ammunition to approach the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approval.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1987
Here's a sampling of what University of Chicago Prof. Allan Bloom has to say about rock 'n' roll in his current best-seller, "The Closing of the American Mind." . . . Rock music has one appeal only, a barbaric appeal, to sexual desire--not love, not eros , but sexual desire undeveloped and untutored. . . . Young people know that rock has the beat of sexual intercourse. That is why Ravel's "Bolero" is the one piece of classical music that is commonly known and liked by them.
HEALTH
July 27, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
I have been taking the oral contraceptive Yaz for about a year. Since starting the drug, I have been less interested in the things that I love. I really am not always interested in sex. I also get headaches on the week of my reminder pill and am very grumpy or insecure during that week. Studies published in 2006 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine show that women taking oral contraceptives may have lower libido and less sexual arousal.
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