Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSexual Desire
IN THE NEWS

Sexual Desire

HEALTH
June 19, 2006 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
Sex and headache are inextricably linked by the age-old excuse: Not tonight, dear. I have a headache. But brain science is finding that it's more complicated than that. For many people, sex can clearly turn a dull throbbing pain into a raging headache. For a few who jump into bed feeling fine, orgasm can trigger a sudden, explosive headache. And for a minority of people, headaches are cured by a roll in the hay.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Rather than "fade in," the screenplay for French filmmaker Jean-Claude Brisseau's symbol-laden erotic drama, "Exterminating Angels," could very well have begun with, "Dear Penthouse ... " Though the film expresses a kinship to Luis Bunuel, Federico Fellini and Jean-Luc Godard and carries a certain degree of high-mindedness, its scenario of an artsy filmmaker obsessed with the subject of female arousal provides plenty of opportunity for male fantasy fulfillment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2000 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
In-your-face depictions of erotic excess delivered with deliberately contemptuous technical surety have been Donald Byrd's choreographic specialty ever since he began presenting work in Los Angeles in the late 1970s.
HEALTH
July 21, 2008 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
When in 1950 Dr. Ernst Grafenberg described finding a surprisingly sensitive spot inside the vagina near the urethra, he made the process seem so foolproof. A medical article detailed his effortless demonstrations of the existence of this "distinct erotogenic zone" -- and the not-unexpected consequences of stimulating such a zone -- in his own patients. Anyone with a vagina could surely do the same for herself. Well, perhaps it was that easy for him.
HEALTH
February 11, 2008 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The product: You can bet that lots of couples this Valentine's Day will be exchanging chocolates, lighting candles and sharing bottles of wine -- time-honored strategies for setting the "mood." But what if your desires have sunk so low that even Godiva and a nice pinot can't rescue you? On Valentine's Day and every other day, sagging libidos mean big business.
HEALTH
July 30, 2007 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
LOVE'S first rush is a private madness between two people, all-consuming and, if mutually felt, endlessly wonderful. Couples think about the other obsessively -- on a roller coaster of euphoria when together, longing when apart. "It's temporary insanity," says Helen Fisher, an evolutionary anthropologist at Rutgers University. Now, from her studies of the brains of lovers in the throes of the initial tumble, Fisher has developed a controversial theory. She and her collaborator, psychiatrist J.
NEWS
July 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Food and Drug Administration said today that a series of products sold as aphrodisiacs did nothing to help sexual desire or performance and banned them from the U.S. market.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Poets say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. Researchers are finding that they are also windows to our sexual identity. The dilation of pupils in response to erotic stimuli may be the most accurate objective measure of an individual's sexuality, researchers reported Monday. The findings confirm a long-held belief among sexual researchers that has apparently not been studied in any depth before. The results provide new insight into the evolutionary development of human sexual responses, suggesting that women may have evolved a more responsive sexuality to help them cope with forced copulation.
SCIENCE
May 5, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sexual desire among female cancer survivors wasn't enhanced by the use of a skin cream containing the hormone testosterone, according to new research from the Mayo Clinic published this week in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The cream was no more effective than a placebo treatment in improving libido in 150 post-menopausal cancer survivors in a trial. The team said the result might be explained by low levels of estrogen, a female hormone, among the study participants
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Sexual desire disorder in women is supposedly a significant problem in the United States, according to some studies and various companies that market products designed to improve women's sex lives. But a large study published this week finds that older women are mostly quite satisfied with their sexual health. If they have a problem, it's because they lack a partner or would like to have more sex, not less. The data are from the Women's Health Initiative, famous for its investigation into the effects of hormone therapy on post-menopausal women.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|