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Sexual Desire

ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Rather than "fade in," the screenplay for French filmmaker Jean-Claude Brisseau's symbol-laden erotic drama, "Exterminating Angels," could very well have begun with, "Dear Penthouse ... " Though the film expresses a kinship to Luis Bunuel, Federico Fellini and Jean-Luc Godard and carries a certain degree of high-mindedness, its scenario of an artsy filmmaker obsessed with the subject of female arousal provides plenty of opportunity for male fantasy fulfillment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2000 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
In-your-face depictions of erotic excess delivered with deliberately contemptuous technical surety have been Donald Byrd's choreographic specialty ever since he began presenting work in Los Angeles in the late 1970s.
HEALTH
July 21, 2008 | Regina Nuzzo, Special to The Times
When in 1950 Dr. Ernst Grafenberg described finding a surprisingly sensitive spot inside the vagina near the urethra, he made the process seem so foolproof. A medical article detailed his effortless demonstrations of the existence of this "distinct erotogenic zone" -- and the not-unexpected consequences of stimulating such a zone -- in his own patients. Anyone with a vagina could surely do the same for herself. Well, perhaps it was that easy for him.
HEALTH
February 11, 2008 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The product: You can bet that lots of couples this Valentine's Day will be exchanging chocolates, lighting candles and sharing bottles of wine -- time-honored strategies for setting the "mood." But what if your desires have sunk so low that even Godiva and a nice pinot can't rescue you? On Valentine's Day and every other day, sagging libidos mean big business.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Poets say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. Researchers are finding that they are also windows to our sexual identity. The dilation of pupils in response to erotic stimuli may be the most accurate objective measure of an individual's sexuality, researchers reported Monday. The findings confirm a long-held belief among sexual researchers that has apparently not been studied in any depth before. The results provide new insight into the evolutionary development of human sexual responses, suggesting that women may have evolved a more responsive sexuality to help them cope with forced copulation.
NEWS
July 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Food and Drug Administration said today that a series of products sold as aphrodisiacs did nothing to help sexual desire or performance and banned them from the U.S. market.
OPINION
October 30, 2011 | By Charlotte Allen
What do "SlutWalks," the anti-rape demonstrations that have been held in nearly every major city, and Halloween parties have in common? A lot. Both feature phalanxes of females flaunting scanty clothing that typically involves lingerie. As everyone knows, the perennial favorite among Halloween costumes for women is "ho," followed by "sexy witch," "sexy nurse" and "Lady Gaga. " So it's hard to spot the difference between the young woman marching down the street clad only in a lace corset and high heels for a SlutWalk and the young woman clad only in a lace corset and high heels for an evening of Oct. 31 club-hopping.
SCIENCE
May 5, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sexual desire among female cancer survivors wasn't enhanced by the use of a skin cream containing the hormone testosterone, according to new research from the Mayo Clinic published this week in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The cream was no more effective than a placebo treatment in improving libido in 150 post-menopausal cancer survivors in a trial. The team said the result might be explained by low levels of estrogen, a female hormone, among the study participants
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If marriage were a contract, most lawyers probably would advise potential newlyweds not to sign it. After all, matrimony is considered one of life's greatest commitments, but it contains absolutely no provisions or guarantees about what husbands and wives are entitled to. Six children? A big paycheck? A golf partner? Great sex? One newlywed might be perfectly happy with someone who can afford to buy half a house in the suburbs, while another demands unbridled passion.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1992 | Reuters
Britain's sex life has taken a dive along with the economy, marriage counselors say. The number of couples complaining of a flagging sex life has increased sharply as financial worries and rising unemployment put many marriages under pressure, said Zelda West-Meads of Relate, a marriage counseling service. "If someone is angry or depressed, they experience a loss of sexual desire," West-Meads said. Relate saw a 30% rise in couples seeking advice as the unemployment rate in Britain climbed to 9.
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