Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSexual Desire
IN THE NEWS

Sexual Desire

BUSINESS
February 14, 1992 | Reuters
Britain's sex life has taken a dive along with the economy, marriage counselors say. The number of couples complaining of a flagging sex life has increased sharply as financial worries and rising unemployment put many marriages under pressure, said Zelda West-Meads of Relate, a marriage counseling service. "If someone is angry or depressed, they experience a loss of sexual desire," West-Meads said. Relate saw a 30% rise in couples seeking advice as the unemployment rate in Britain climbed to 9.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Corroborating the testimony of the chief defendant in the McMartin Pre-School child molestation trial, a woman testified today that she had sex with Raymond Buckey in 1982. The unexpected testimony came after the defense had predicted that it would rest its case today after having called 40 witnesses over a 10-month period.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Obese men who want to improve their sexual health might have another solution besides their erectile dysfunction drugs. A study finds that overweight men who lost just 5% of their weight over eight weeks saw improvements in erectile dysfunction, sexual desire and urinary tract symptoms. The small study focused on 31 obese men with a body mass index of 30 or greater and who had Type 2 diabetes. Some were put on a low-calorie diet that included liquid meal replacements and others were assigned to a high-protein, low-fat diet that decreased their calorie intake by 600 calories a day. For 42 weeks afterward the participants stayed on the high-protein diet, or were switched to it. Those on the low-calorie diet lost 10% of their body weight and 10% off their waist circumference, and those on the high-protein diet lost 5% of their weight and waist circumference.
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Long after Sigmund Freud suggested--and then backed away from the concept--that the source of many psychiatric problems in adults was sexual molestation in childhood, mental health therapists are only beginning to identify the problems that follow molestation victims into adulthood. But recent progress has been significant, experts say, as more adults come forward to reveal past abuse and seek treatment for emotional wounds.
SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Over a five-year period, a government-mandated tracking system in France showed that physicians in that country treated 1,979 patients for serious health problems associated with the use of marijuana, and nearly 2% of those encounters were with patients suffering from cardiovascular problems, including heart attack, cardiac arrhythmia and stroke, and circulation problems in the arms and legs. In roughly a quarter of those cases, the study found, the patient died. In the United States, when young and otherwise healthy patients show up in emergency departments with symptoms of heart attack, stroke, cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmia, physicians have frequently noted in case reports that these unusual patients are regular marijuana users.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If marriage were a contract, most lawyers probably would advise potential newlyweds not to sign it. After all, matrimony is considered one of life's greatest commitments, but it contains absolutely no provisions or guarantees about what husbands and wives are entitled to. Six children? A big paycheck? A golf partner? Great sex? One newlywed might be perfectly happy with someone who can afford to buy half a house in the suburbs, while another demands unbridled passion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By Jasmine Elist, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
As change sweeps across the Arab world, there are a variety of lenses through which to examine these changes: religious, cultural, political, economic. Shereen El Feki has chosen a decidedly less conventional lens with her new new book “Sex and the Citadel: Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World” (Pantheon, $29), due out Tuesday. The book takes a close look at the sexual lives of men and women in the Middle East. Combining original research with first-person stories from housewives, young virgins, activists and sex therapists, “Sex and the Citadel” provides a detailed account of a veiled and sensitive aspect of Arab society.
NEWS
August 26, 2002 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Forty years ago, the birth-control pill freed women from fear of pregnancy and gave them the ability to engage in spontaneous, uninterrupted sexual intercourse. So it is somewhat ironic that recent research has found that for a minority of women, the pill has the unintended and surprising effect of diminishing sexual desire.
BOOKS
September 7, 1997 | SUSIE LINFIELD, Susie Linfield is the acting director of the cultural reporting and criticism program at New York University
Five years ago, Harvard psychologist Carol Gilligan published "Meeting at the Crossroads," a luminously empathetic study of adolescents at an all-girls private school in Cleveland.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2007 | Clarke Canfield, Associated Press
When moviemakers wanted to film "Peyton Place" in this small seaside town, the bestselling novel the movie was to be based on was so scandalous that the local library didn't even keep it on its shelves. The book had sparked outrage with its titillating look behind closed doors in a proper New England town. People read it in secret, and it was banned from many schools But that didn't keep Camden from welcoming 20th Century Fox to turn its streets, homes and people into "Peyton Place."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|