Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSexual Identity
IN THE NEWS

Sexual Identity

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
December 17, 2000
Lynn Conway's courageous story of her life before and after gender reassignment offered thoughtful insight into a misunderstood and often ill-reported situation ("Through the Gender Labyrinth," by Michael A. Hiltzik, Nov. 19). By sharing her private struggles and ultimate joys, Conway has enlightened the public and given much-needed hope to other individuals who are struggling with their sexual identities. The transgender community is rarely seen in such a fair and accurate manner. Conway deserves our thanks, as does reporter Hiltzik.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2012 | Sandy Banks
The state Legislature wrapped up its lawmaking session in Sacramento this week, sending Gov. Jerry Brown dozens of bills, regulating hunters, farmers, used-car dealers. But one bill in particular piqued my interest. It would limit the kind of therapy that counselors can offer to gay children. And it would make California - depending on your perspective - either a national leader in protecting gay and lesbian kids, or a symbol of nitpicky "nanny state" intrusion. If it becomes law, California will be the only state in the nation that forbids mental health professionals from trying to convert young patients from gay or lesbian to straight.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1992 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov is a regular contributor to Calendar
A funny thing happened to "An Unfinished Song" on its way to the Tiffany Theatre. The heterosexual love story became a gay love story. "This is the fourth production of the show," said writer-composer James J. Mellon, who is also directing and co-starring in the musical. "The first time we did it was in 1987 in San Francisco, and the main character was a woman."
SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Poets say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. Researchers are finding that they are also windows to our sexual identity. The dilation of pupils in response to erotic stimuli may be the most accurate objective measure of an individual's sexuality, researchers reported Monday. The findings confirm a long-held belief among sexual researchers that has apparently not been studied in any depth before. The results provide new insight into the evolutionary development of human sexual responses, suggesting that women may have evolved a more responsive sexuality to help them cope with forced copulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1995 | From Times staff writers
Men who believe that they are women trapped in a male body may be at least partially correct, according to a new study in the journal Nature. A team from the Netherlands found that sexual identity may be controlled not by body shape, but by a small portion of the hypothalamus called the bed nucleus of stria terminalis, or BST. Autopsies showed that this area of the brain, which has previously been linked to sexual activity in animals, is about 31% larger in men than in women.
NEWS
March 14, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stephanie Thomas was such a fervently religious child that she proselytized for her church as a junior high school student in Palos Verdes. She continued her efforts during high school and converted her own mother and sisters to the "born-again" Christian faith she had chosen. But during her first semester at a Christian college, Azusa Pacific University, Thomas found herself attracted to a young woman in her freshman class.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
It was considered a medical triumph 33 years ago when John became Joan. John was 8 months old when his penis was accidentally destroyed during minor surgery to correct a problem with the foreskin. Doctors advised his horrified parents to raise the child as a girl, and surgery to create female anatomy followed shortly thereafter. The 1964 operation made headlines around the world.
SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Poets say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. Researchers are finding that they are also windows to our sexual identity. The dilation of pupils in response to erotic stimuli may be the most accurate objective measure of an individual's sexuality, researchers reported Monday. The findings confirm a long-held belief among sexual researchers that has apparently not been studied in any depth before. The results provide new insight into the evolutionary development of human sexual responses, suggesting that women may have evolved a more responsive sexuality to help them cope with forced copulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
San Francisco State University is launching the first program in the advanced study of sexuality in the Western United States. The 30-unit master's program includes courses on the sociocultural foundations of human sexuality, sexual cultures and diversity, disability and sexuality, sexual identity formation, and sexual and gender role development and behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1993
Nunn has stated that "unit cohesion is the bottom line" when it comes to maintaining the ban against gays and lesbians in the military. And for this reason, he is adamantly opposed to lifting the ban. What is he telling us? That he is afraid of the prospect that Colin Powell and a number of our Joint Chiefs cannot maintain discipline in our armed forces if gays and lesbians are allowed to serve regardless of their sexual identity? Remember, we are not talking about their conduct; we are talking about their sexual identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Tribune newspapers
In One Person A Novel John Irving Simon & Schuster: 426 pp., $28 Late in John Irving's 13th novel, "In One Person," the narrator, an aging writer named William Abbott, recalls visiting a high school friend dying of AIDS. It's the early 1980s, the beginning of the AIDS crisis, and Irving evokes the deathly terrors of that period, a time when people seemed, literally, to evaporate, to become, in the words of the late David Wojnarowicz, "a dark smudge in the air that dissipates without notice … glass human[s]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
California's state colleges and universities are laying plans to ask students about their sexual orientation next year on application or enrollment forms, becoming the largest group of schools in the country to do so. The move has raised the hopes of gay activists for recognition but the concerns of others about privacy. The questions, which students could answer voluntarily, would be posed because of a little-known state law aimed at gauging the size of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
That gay teens are more likely to consider suicide is a well-known and tragic fact . But now research indicates that gay and bisexual teens are also more likely to engage in a wide range of risky behavior -- such as using drugs, alcohol and tobacco; having unprotected sex; and trying to lose weight through diet pills or vomiting.  The news comes from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analysis released Monday of survey responses...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
If filmmaker Gregg Araki once described his 1997 movie "Nowhere" as "'Beverly Hills, 90210' on acid," then it might be best to think of the writer-director's newest feature, "Kaboom," as something like "Gossip Girl" gone gonzo. The story of an 18-year-old pansexual film student named Smith (Thomas Dekker), the film boasts all of the hallmarks of Araki's work: Attractive young people work through issues of sexual identity (in part by having a lot of sex in various gender permutations)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2010 | Sandy Banks
Alan Weeks came of age when gay meant happy, not homosexual, and coming out was for debutantes. "I am a 78-year-old man who grew up in Los Angeles when you did not tell anyone you were gay," he told me. "We all just lived in a separate world inside the straight world. It was a totally secret world. " He has never been to a Gay Pride parade; never worn a Speedo or 3-inch heels; never considered trying to marry the man he loved and lived with for 22 years. He spent his youth consigned to what we now call the closet, uncertain and ashamed, at times, of his sexuality.
OPINION
July 2, 2009
Re "The ABC's of LGBT," Editorial, June 19 Your editorial contains some misleading information. The Alameda Unified School District curriculum does not actually focus "solely on gay and lesbian issues" and "sexual identity." In fact, the word "sex" is only used twice in six lessons. You correctly point out that the curriculum will teach second-graders that same-gender parents exist. Children will learn that those parents are part of loving families, along with single parents, adoptive parents and biracial parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1991
Your article on gays having babies carried in its subtitle the comment that perhaps such arrangements "could help society accept homosexuals." The article, while covering a wide variety of topics, failed to mention that many consider homosexuality a type of sexual addiction. Many fine people are struggling with their sexual identity and should be aware that there exist a variety of caring, support groups, including Homosexuals Anonymous, Courage (for Catholics) and Exodus. Such organizations exist not to judge the person but to help people with sexual compulsions grow psychologically and lead integrated lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2007
I agree with Gina Piccalo's main tenet that current movies and ads that derive their humor from straight men being mistaken for gay are not overtly homophobic ["Of Ice and Men," March 25]. But what she fails to consider is the way these jokes are consumed in mainstream America. Despite their intentions, ads like the Snickers Super Bowl spot subtly reinforce that homosexuality (or the appearance thereof) is something to be avoided at all costs -- an all too prevalent view. Until there are more gay characters on TV and in movies not defined by their sexual identity and more men who are comfortable with their sexuality, both on TV and in society, reinforcing homophobic stereotypes is irresponsible.
OPINION
June 19, 2009
It's high time that schools took anti-bullying measures more seriously. We just never thought that would include requiring fifth-graders to recite the meaning of each letter in LGBT. In attempting to discourage taunting of gay students, the Alameda Unified School District turned what should be a basic lesson on treating others kindly into a primer on sexual identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2007
I agree with Gina Piccalo's main tenet that current movies and ads that derive their humor from straight men being mistaken for gay are not overtly homophobic ["Of Ice and Men," March 25]. But what she fails to consider is the way these jokes are consumed in mainstream America. Despite their intentions, ads like the Snickers Super Bowl spot subtly reinforce that homosexuality (or the appearance thereof) is something to be avoided at all costs -- an all too prevalent view. Until there are more gay characters on TV and in movies not defined by their sexual identity and more men who are comfortable with their sexuality, both on TV and in society, reinforcing homophobic stereotypes is irresponsible.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|