Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSexual Orientation
IN THE NEWS

Sexual Orientation

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2013 | By Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
As a young boy, Paul Christiano loved the world of girls - the way they danced, how their spindly bodies tumbled in gymnastics. In adolescence, as other boys ogled classmates, he was troubled to find himself fantasizing about 7- to 11-year-olds. His desires remained stuck in time as he neared adulthood. Despite a stable home life in suburban Chicago, he was tortured by urges he knew could land him in prison. "For having these feelings, I was destined to become a monster," he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A Boy Scout troop in Seattle that was chartered in November lost its affiliation with the national organization last week after refusing to remove a scout leader who is gay, Boy Scouts of America said. Geoffrey McGrath first announced his sexual orientation in 1988. But last month, his personal life caught the Boy Scouts' attention. McGrath had answered a news reporter's question about his sexual orientation during an interview about his troop, and the reporter in turn checked in with Boy Scouts officials.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
August 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Poets say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. Researchers are finding that they are also windows to our sexual identity. The dilation of pupils in response to erotic stimuli may be the most accurate objective measure of an individual's sexuality, researchers reported Monday. The findings confirm a long-held belief among sexual researchers that has apparently not been studied in any depth before. The results provide new insight into the evolutionary development of human sexual responses, suggesting that women may have evolved a more responsive sexuality to help them cope with forced copulation.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Michael McGough
What does the federal Violence Against Women Act have to do with outlawing discrimination against gays and lesbians? A good deal, it turns out. The latest version of the law, which among other things provides grants to agencies that deal with victims of sexual assaults, has a nondiscrimination provision. It says that recipients may not discriminate in their hiring on the basis of “actual or perceived race, color, religion, national origin, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, or disability.” The Justice Department recently released a briefing paper on implementation of the law. There is a limited exception for necessary “sex-specific programming.” Also, religious agencies, consistent with the Religion Freedom Restoration Act, may prefer members of their own faith in hiring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- A federal appeals court Thursday upheld a state law that prohibits licensed mental health therapists from trying to change the sexual orientation of minors. The unanimous ruling by a three-judge panel said the never-enforced law does not violate the free speech rights of patients or professionals, or the fundamental rights of parents. The state has the right to prohibit treatment it deems harmful, the court said. Therapy to change a person's sexual orientation began when the psychiatric profession considered homosexuality a disease, a belief that was abandoned in the early 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal appeals court appeared troubled Wednesday by the removal of gay and lesbian prospective jurors on the basis of their sexual orientation. During a hearing, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals considered the issue in the context of an appeal from a jury verdict reached in a dispute between two drug makers, Abbott Laboratories and SmithKline Beecham. An attorney for Abbott used a peremptory challenge during a 2011 trial to dismiss a man who had spoken of his male partner during voir dire questioning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1998
Re "Equal Protection for the Last Outcasts," Commentary, Feb. 27: The belief that homosexual behaviors are the result of an unalterable condition over which one has no choice is not based on science or everyday experience. People are constantly changing their sexual behaviors. Whatever you might believe about the origins or nature of homosexual feelings, people always have choices about their behavior and lifestyle. The attempt to define homosexuality as a class of people to be protected against discrimination does not help people accept their homosexual feelings.
SPORTS
June 2, 2010 | By David Wharton and Melissa Rohlin
There was nothing complicated about that photograph of Elena Kagan, the one that showed her standing at bat on a playground diamond. Maybe if she had been kicking a soccer ball or diving off the high board, there wouldn't have been as much fuss. But the Supreme Court nominee's sexual orientation was already the stuff of rumors, given that she was single and kept her hair short. Her supporters accused conservatives of trying to damage her chances by whispering that she was gay. Adding softball to the conversation only amped up the volume, all those bloggers and television commentators, and the White House was compelled to reiterate that Kagan was heterosexual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1996 | DADE HAYES
Gay historian Jonathan Ned Katz, whose book "The Invention of Heterosexuality" asserts that sexual orientation is a societal construction rather than an "immutable, normal feature of human behavior," will speak tonight at Cal State Northridge. The talk will be drawn from the book, which was published last year. In the book, Katz tracks a century's worth of societal views of heterosexuality to prove it is "an invented tradition."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego County Sheriff's Department announced Thursday that it will officially forbid discrimination or harassment against lesbians and gay men based on sexual orientation, settling a suit brought by a lesbian graduate of a recent department training academy. Under the settlement, signed and filed Thursday in San Diego Superior Court, the department's official rule book will be amended to specifically bar prejudice based on sexual orientation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Ron Smith, a rare campaign strategist who worked both sides of the partisan aisle, managing races for some of California's most prominent politicians in a decades-long career, died Tuesday at a hospital in San Francisco. He was 71 and had a blood infection. Smith, who was openly gay long before it was widely accepted, promoted candidates who shared his philosophy of fiscal conservatism and broad-mindedness on social issues. Most were Republicans, including several from Silicon Valley, among them former Reps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
SAN FRANCISCO -- Ron Smith, a rare campaign strategist who worked both sides of the partisan aisle, managing races for some of California's most prominent politicians in a decades-long career, has died. He was 71 and suffered a blood infection. Smith, who was openly gay long before it was widely accepted, promoted candidates who shared his philosophy of fiscal conservatism and broad-mindedness on social issues. Most were Republicans, including several from Silicon Valley, among them former Reps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal appeals court agreed Monday to put on hold a ruling in favor of a California law that bans licensed therapists from trying to change a minor's sexual orientation. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9thCircuit Court of Appeals gave opponents of the ban 90 days to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. The 9th Circuit upheld the law in August and refused last month to hear another challenge. Liberty Counsel, a religious rights group, then asked the court to block enforcement of the law pending an appeal to the high court.
SPORTS
February 3, 2014 | By David Wharton
SOCHI, Russia -- Speaking to reporters just days before the 2014 Sochi Games, the top Olympic official said he is open to adding language to the Olympic charter that specifically addresses discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Thomas Bach, president of the International Olympic Committee, insisted on Monday that "we stand against any kind of discrimination for whatever reason. " Gay rights have become an issue at these Games because of a controversial Russian law that criminalizes "propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations" in the presence of minors.
OPINION
January 31, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
A California law that prohibits therapists from trying to change the sexual orientation of children and adolescents survived another legal challenge this week. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals announced that an earlier decision by a three-judge panel upholding the law wouldn't be reconsidered by a larger group of 11 judges. That was the correct decision. But a judge who believes the law should be reconsidered on free-speech grounds raised an important question in his dissenting opinion.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Nico Lang, guest blogger
Earlier this month, the sports website Grantland  ignited controversy  over a story on Essay Anne Vanderbilt, also known as Dr. V, the inventor of a “scientifically superior” golf club dubbed “The Oracle.” In writing  the article , titled “Dr. V's Magical Putter,” reporter Caleb Hannan discovered something he didn't expect about his subject: She was a transgender woman. In October, Hannan writes, Dr. V killed herself before his article was even finished. Responding to her suicide within his piece, Hannan wrote:  “Writing a eulogy for a person who by all accounts despised you is an odd experience....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"All Over the Guy" is a romantic comedy of wit and substance that actor-writer Dan Bucatinsky and director Julie Davis have moved gracefully from stage to screen with a change of title and sexual orientation. Bucatinsky starred in his play "I Know You Are, but What Am I?" with Nicole Tocantins. In the screen version he's paired with Richard Ruccolo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
California's state colleges and universities are laying plans to ask students about their sexual orientation next year on application or enrollment forms, becoming the largest group of schools in the country to do so. The move has raised the hopes of gay activists for recognition but the concerns of others about privacy. The questions, which students could answer voluntarily, would be posed because of a little-known state law aimed at gauging the size of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal appeals court became the first in the nation to rule that prospective jurors may not be excluded because of their sexual orientation, a decision that expands juror protections beyond race and gender and provides legal ammunition to challenge laws that limit gay rights. The sweeping, unanimous decision Tuesday by a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a mixed jury verdict in an antitrust case involving an AIDS drug. The 9th Circuit said the case would have to be retried because an obviously gay juror was unjustifiably excluded from the jury.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - The gay rights movement won at least a preliminary victory Monday as the Senate voted to advance a measure that would ban workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. The 61-30 procedural vote does not necessarily predict the final outcome, expected later this week. But statements of support from Republicans ensured that the bill known as the Employment Non-Discrimination Act could attract the necessary 60 votes to overcome any additional procedural hurdles.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|