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Sexual Orientation

NEWS
March 12, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The first large study of female sexual orientation has found a strong genetic component to homosexuality, researchers at Boston University and Northwestern University report today. Previous studies of male homosexuals have obtained the same result, but those studies have been highly criticized because the groups examined did not include women.
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NEWS
October 2, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Twilight of the Golds" is a recent stage play about the agonies of a pregnant woman who ponders whether to abort her baby when a genetic test predicts that the child will be gay. When the play was written only a few years ago, the notion of testing to determine sexual orientation was not much more than a playwright's conceit.
HEALTH
December 8, 2003 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
With gay marriage now supported by Massachusetts' highest court and gay rights likely to be an issue in the presidential campaign, the question of whether sexual orientation is an innate or acquired trait is an increasingly urgent one. Since at least 1991, some scientific research has suggested a biological basis to homosexuality -- meaning sexual orientation is probably at least partly natural destiny, not simply choice.
BOOKS
March 5, 1995 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times film writer.
When Joseph Hansen's "Living Upstairs" was published in late 1993, fans who mourned the passing of his Dave Branstetter private-eye series were cheered by this novel, which introduced us to 20-year-old struggling writer Nathan Reed, who was in the throes of a first love while living in side-street Hollywood in 1943.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II and NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A tiny segment of the brain believed to govern sexual activity is smaller in gay men than in heterosexuals, a trait that offers the first specific evidence of a biological cause for homosexuality, a San Diego researcher has reported. His conclusions, to be published today in the journal Science, are certain to enliven scientific and social debate over the role of choice in determining whether a person is homosexual. Opinions began to form this week even before the study was publicly released.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fred Hersch doesn't have a lot of time for self-pity these days. With no less than seven albums on the market that include his participation as piano soloist, producer or composer, his 20-year career in the jazz business has suddenly begun to take off. Ironically, the increased attention is, in some measure at least, related to his announcement last year that he is HIV-positive and gay--the first such public revelation by a well-known jazz performer.
NEWS
March 2, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A broad-ranging legal challenge to the year-old "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military was filed this week on behalf of a California Army National Guardsman recently discharged for stating that he is gay. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco on Tuesday, joins a long line of court cases seeking to overturn the Pentagon's anti-gay regulations. This effort invokes some new arguments, principally that the ouster of 1st Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1992 | From Religious News Service
The head of the United States Catholic Conference on Wednesday defended a recent Vatican document that justifies discrimination against homosexuals, but also assured homosexuals that local bishops will work to safeguard their rights. Archbishop Daniel E. Pilarczyk of Cincinnati, president of the conference, said in a prepared statement issued in Washington that bishops will evaluate local laws aimed at extending civil rights for homosexuals with the Vatican document in mind.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1998 | DIANNE FEINSTEIN and ROBERT G. TORRICELLI, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Sen. Robert G. Torricelli (D-N.J.) have led efforts to confirm Hormel
As this country during its history has expanded opportunity to all Americans, the diplomatic corps that represents the U.S. abroad followed suit. In 1949, the Senate confirmed the first female American ambassador, Eugenie Moore Anderson, to represent the United States in Denmark. In 1953, the Senate voted to send the first African American ambassador, Jessie Locker, to serve as envoy to Liberia. And in 1965, the Senate approved the nomination of Patricia Harris to be the U.S.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two students stepped out of a history class at Cal State Long Beach a few months ago and got into a fistfight in a dispute over African-American history. During the confrontation, one of the combatants hurled a series of racial epithets at the other, who is black. Last month, an educational psychology professor was accused of belittling African-American culture in class and using a racial slur in a conversation with a black student. The Black Student Union demanded his ouster.
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