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Sexual Orientation

NEWS
March 22, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Malcolm Forbes, the flamboyant publisher known for his relationships with hot-air balloons and Elizabeth Taylor, had been dead only a week when rumors about his sexual orientation hit the mainstream media. In a USA Today gossip column, Forbes, the divorced father of five children and grandfather of nine, was described as "leading a gay lifestyle for at least the last five years."
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NEWS
April 3, 1994 | MARY JORDAN, WASHINGTON POST
The newest dormitory at Brown University, one set aside chiefly for African Americans, is called Harambee House, Swahili for "the coming together of community." Already on Brown's hilltop campus overlooking downtown are Hispanic House, French House, Slavic House, East Asian House and German House.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2006 | Arin Gencer, Times Staff Writer
The 15 young adults stepped onto the campus of Riverside's California Baptist University on Tuesday expecting some conflict. Lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, they wanted to challenge students' ways of thinking about sexual orientation. They wanted to tell the school's possibly closeted students that God loved them, and that being gay and Christian was not a contradiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fred Hersch doesn't have a lot of time for self-pity these days. With no less than seven albums on the market that include his participation as piano soloist, producer or composer, his 20-year career in the jazz business has suddenly begun to take off. Ironically, the increased attention is, in some measure at least, related to his announcement last year that he is HIV-positive and gay--one of the first such public revelations by a well-known jazz performer.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and STEVEN R. CHURM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a blow to Mayor Larry Agran and the city's political establishment, religious fundamentalists and conservatives scored a major victory in an unprecedented battle in Orange County over homosexual rights. By approving Measure N, voters removed protections for homosexuals from the city's 15-month-old human rights ordinance. It was the first vote of its kind in Southern California, and Agran, one of the leading opponents of the measure, labeled the outcome a "terrible setback."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1996 | MATEA GOLD TIMES STAFF WRITER
Huong Nguyen's family had to leave its world, postwar Vietnam, to forge a new life in the United States. Now the UCLA senior has had to stand between two other spheres, torn between her identity as a bisexual and her commitment to the military. On Feb. 1, Nguyen was dropped from the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps, nine months after she wrote to her commander, saying she is gay. (Although she used the term "gay" in her letter, she identifies herself as bisexual.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge Tuesday dismissed charges against a gay sheriff's deputy accused of falsifying a 1989 arrest report, ending a case that had prompted accusations of discrimination and fueled calls for an independent police force in West Hollywood, where he had worked. Judge Judith L. Champagne granted a motion by prosecutors to drop charges against Deputy Bruce C. Boland. Boland faced a felony charge of preparing false evidence and three related misdemeanor charges.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY and KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton plans to issue a policy order as early as today that will formally direct the military to halt new prosecutions of homosexual members of the armed services and to cease asking new recruits about their sexual orientation, White House officials said Wednesday.
OPINION
January 13, 2013 | By Wade Davis
When I was 7 years old, my friends and I would play football in my backyard for hours, often with my mother watching through the kitchen window. One of the games we played was called "smear the queer. " At the time I didn't know what "queer" meant. I only knew if you were brave enough to pick up the ball, you were "the queer" and would get creamed. As I got older, I learned what that term meant, and then, in high school, I realized that I was gay. But that image of how "the queer" got "smeared" stayed with me. I ultimately realized my goal of becoming a professional football player, but being open about my sexuality while I was a player seemed far too dangerous to consider.
OPINION
September 2, 2010 | By Arturo J. González
I write on behalf of the Bar Assn. of San Francisco, a legal professional membership organization with 8,000 members that works to elevate the standards of integrity, honor and respect in the practice of law. I disagree with Times Assistant Managing Editor David Lauter's claim that the sexual orientation of Northern District of California Chief Judge Vaughn Walker is relevant to the paper's reporting on the federal Proposition 8 case Walker...
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