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August 17, 1986 | John M. Wilson
Faye Dunaway has "committed" and Treat Williams has "sort-of committed" to star in Paul Bartel's "Scenes From the Class Struggle in Beverly Hills," to be financed by RKO. It's all in the negotiation stage, Bartel told us. The script (by Bruce Wagner) comes from a Bartel notion about "two wealthy women in Beverly Hills, one a widow and one a divorcee, who live next door and the various sexual relationships between them and their servants."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
Written with a poet's ear and directed with an artist's eye, "Forgetting the Girl" plumbs the psyche of an unassuming studio photographer, Kevin Wolfe (Christopher Denham). Traumatized by his sister's drowning when they were kids, he compensates by asking out the women who come to him for head shots. He's looking for a "real girl," not the porn stars whose photos his landlord lusts over - the salacious content of which isn't shown on-screen but, in a masterful touch by director Nate Taylor, revealed by viewers' reactions to them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Lewis Segal
A horrific, unforgettable action painting of male energy, intimacy and agony, the collaborative, partly improvisational “Them” comes to the REDCAT at Walt Disney Concert Hall as a reminder of the fierce beauty of contemporary dance - even contemporary dance backdated by more than a quarter-century.  Created in 1986, "Them" has been reconstructed into the award-winning version that opened Thursday for a four-performance run (through Sunday)....
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Lewis Segal
A horrific, unforgettable action painting of male energy, intimacy and agony, the collaborative, partly improvisational “Them” comes to the REDCAT at Walt Disney Concert Hall as a reminder of the fierce beauty of contemporary dance - even contemporary dance backdated by more than a quarter-century.  Created in 1986, "Them" has been reconstructed into the award-winning version that opened Thursday for a four-performance run (through Sunday)....
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
Written with a poet's ear and directed with an artist's eye, "Forgetting the Girl" plumbs the psyche of an unassuming studio photographer, Kevin Wolfe (Christopher Denham). Traumatized by his sister's drowning when they were kids, he compensates by asking out the women who come to him for head shots. He's looking for a "real girl," not the porn stars whose photos his landlord lusts over - the salacious content of which isn't shown on-screen but, in a masterful touch by director Nate Taylor, revealed by viewers' reactions to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1996 | DONALD PREZIOSI, Donald Preziosi is a professor of art history at UCLA
Christopher Knight's review of the UCLA/Armand Hammer Museum's landmark "Sexual Politics" exhibition and his ad hominem attack on the show's curator, Amelia Jones, must surely be one of the oddest journalistic events of the season, given the near-universal astonishment the review has spawned both on the Internet and in some feminist and more general art historical circles just this past week ("More Famine Than Feast," Calendar, May 2).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1992 | T.H. McCULLOH, T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for Calendar.
"We'd all sit around," says playwright Lori Saveriano, referring to production meetings for her latest play, "and we'd talk and smoke cigarettes--which we're not supposed to do. I'd come home, and my husband would say, 'You've been smoking with the girls!' " Saveriano laughs as she recalls her answer, "Yes, it's true!" But they were excited, she explains, because their production was coming together after two years of hard work and hope.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
The heaving bosom, the siren glare and the fated embrace have been reclaimed with thrilling sensuality in Catherine Breillat's "The Last Mistress," the French filmmaker's bid to put aside the extreme sex of her most notorious work ("Romance," "Anatomy of Hell") and indulge instead in the extreme cinematic pleasures of a well-told yarn of merciless desire.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1986 | DON SHIRLEY
Tony Barsha's "Amos and Ann," at the Wallenboyd, is unyielding in its male perspective. Yet women, as much as men, may appreciate the glee with which "Amos" dismembers the sexual politics of the 1958-60 period in which it's set. It's the story of Amos, a middle-aged Laguna Beach contractor who offers his experiences as a cautionary tale for young men who foolishly endeavor to understand women.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early on in "Compleat Female Stage Beauty," which opened Saturday at the Old Globe, Shakespearean actor Edward Kynaston is horrified to learn that King Charles II is about to lift the ban on women appearing on stage. Kynaston had become a superstar by playing female roles and is in the midst of a triumphant run as Desdemona in "Othello" when his world starts to crumble. "A woman playing a woman?" he wails. "What's the trick in that?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
On a cold and dreary November afternoon, the cozy lobby of the Chateau Marmont calls to mind Dublin's once historic Morrison's Hotel, where Albert Nobbs, the title character in the new gender-bending drama starring Glenn Close, works as a waiter. Clad in black, Close and her costar Janet McTeer sit side by side in armchairs, digging into identical tuna salads and pots of English Breakfast tea — both equally exhilarated, if exhausted. For Close, the film's Friday opening, a one-week theatrical run that precedes a wider January release, represents the culmination of a 30-year artistic odyssey, one that last week netted both actresses nominations for Golden Globe and SAG awards.
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Patrick Kevin Day, Los Angeles Times
It's long been said that there are no new ideas in Hollywood. But we have to admit that there have been some pretty good new incarnations of the old ones. Here we trace the possible genetic forebears of AMC's "Mad Men. " PREMISE "Mad Men": A poor Korean war soldier reinvents himself as a suave ad executive and family man and confronts the increasingly complicated sexual politics of the 1960s. "thirtysomething": Peace-loving hippies of the 1960s reinvent themselves as ad executives and family men and confront the increasingly complicated sexual politics of the 1980s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2010 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Robert Schimmel, a critically acclaimed comedian who made audiences squirm and then laugh with X-rated explorations of sexuality and vulnerability usually drawn from his own life, has died. He was 60. Schimmel died Friday at a Phoenix hospice from injuries sustained in an Aug. 26 car accident, said his brother, Jeff Schimmel. He had suffered serious head and internal injuries whose treatment was complicated by liver disease. The Scottsdale resident was waiting for a liver transplant at the time of his death, his brother said.
OPINION
April 4, 2010
When we're positively weary of the negative (terrorism, famine, political polarization and the inevitability of debt and taxes), cartoonists can always fool around with sexual politics, taking strange political bedfellows to task. Tom Toles whipped out a piece punishing Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele for some GOP extracurricular clubbing. I wondered if the right wing would ever get it right on gay rights. And Mike Luckovich discovered links between golf and the Vatican pedophilia scandal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2010
Where you've seen him. . . . Rob Corddry may still be best known as a correspondent on "The Daily Show." Among his many other appearances: "Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay," "Semi-Pro," "Blades of Glory," "W." (as Ari Fleischer). Lately, he has been writing, directing, producing and starring in the Web series "Children's Hospital": "Our show is similar to 'Grey's Anatomy'; all the sexual politics, but in a children's hospital. Just as inappropriate, but in front of 10-year-olds."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
The heaving bosom, the siren glare and the fated embrace have been reclaimed with thrilling sensuality in Catherine Breillat's "The Last Mistress," the French filmmaker's bid to put aside the extreme sex of her most notorious work ("Romance," "Anatomy of Hell") and indulge instead in the extreme cinematic pleasures of a well-told yarn of merciless desire.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1992 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Part of the interest in Fernando de Rojas' "La Celestina," at the Bilingual Foundation's Little Theatre, is historical. When it was written, a century before Shakespeare's time, there was no secular theater in Spain. It was meant to be read. Margarita Stocker's translation and the adaptation by Margarita Galban and Stocker have whittled it from nine hours to its present, handsome, worthy and workable shape.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
A full-page newspaper ad--a public service announcement--is tacked to the wall next to my desk. Most of the page is taken up by a photograph of a little girl who looks strikingly like my own. This little girl, though, is dead; she was killed by a drunken driver in 1991.
NEWS
June 1, 2006
Re " 'Ex-Gays' Seek a Say in Schools," May 28 Your article on activist ex-gays fails to present a significant fact. Although some people present themselves to mental health professionals or religious leaders believing they are depressed because of their homosexuality, a deeper understanding reveals that they are more likely depressed because societal acceptance remains elusive. It is the ethical responsibility of any professional, whether secular or religious, to attempt to address the underlying cause for a client's depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Women have always defined the sexual politics of modern dance, and the four female- directed companies that appeared in the latest edition of "Split: Dance In and Out of L.A." offered a kind of seminar on the subject Saturday at the Alex Theatre in Glendale. Michigan-based choreographer Laurie Eisenhower provided the most dramatic extremes.
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