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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1999
I do not think most of us in the psychoanalytic community would agree with Dr. Arnold I. Gilberg's opinion (letter, Feb. 22) that it is the labeling of difficulties in a person's sexual function that causes low self-esteem. Rather, it is the feelings of inadequacy and shame about the sexual difficulty which lead the person to conceal the problem, often with a sense of embarrassment and hopelessness. The recent response to the news about Viagra is evidence that there are many individuals hoping for such help but who have been reluctant to reveal their problem.
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NATIONAL
January 23, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Top Air Force brass told a congressional panel Wednesday that they had made progress in addressing the underlying problems of culture and discipline that led to repeated cases of sexual misconduct at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas, calling sexual assault in the ranks "a cancer. " The generals' accounts were challenged by victims, who called sexual assaults in the military "epidemic" and insisted that alleged perpetrators be independently investigated and prosecuted outside the military chain of command.
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NEWS
May 23, 1985 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
A group of physicians associated with Memorial Medical Center of Long Beach has opened a clinic for the diagnosis and treatment of sexual dysfunction in men and women. Although many area clinics treat male sexual dysfunction, centers equipped to diagnose and treat sexual problems of women are rare, said Dr. Allan Shanberg, director of the Memorial Center for Sexual Function, which opened Monday. "Roles are changing," said Shanberg, a staff urologist at the medical center.
SCIENCE
April 26, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
An experimental spray-on anesthetic may be the cure for many men suffering from premature ejaculation -- increasing the time to orgasm more than sixfold, according to new findings to be presented this week. In a double-blind trial of more than 300 men with a lifetime history of prematurity, researchers found that the mean time to orgasm increased from about 0.6 minutes to 3.8 minutes in those using the spray.
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
More than 40% of women and 30% of men regularly have no interest in sex, can't have an orgasm or suffer from some other sexual problem, according to a new analysis of data in a comprehensive U.S. sex survey. The analysis, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., is based on extensive interviews with 1,749 women and 1,410 men done in 1992.
HEALTH
May 8, 2006 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
ELIZABETH Hartofelis had never used birth control pills, relying instead on a diaphragm and then on her husband Christopher's vasectomy to avoid pregnancy. But at age 43, when she started experiencing hot flashes and night sweats, typical symptoms of perimenopause, she began taking a low-dose oral contraceptive to stabilize her fluctuating hormones. A few months later, she lost all interest in sex. "I just felt like I was neutered," says the Westford, Conn., woman.
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | Sandy Banks
It was a fitting release for the week leading up to Valentine's Day . . . a report on sex that lent an air of desperation to all those folks in line at candy counters and Victoria's Secret. Simply put, black lace teddies and romantic candlelight dinners aside, American men and women are dreadful in the sex department. That's the finding of what's been hailed as "the most revealing snapshot of American sexual health" since the Kinsey Report 50 years ago.
NEWS
September 16, 2002 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I have said that I could live the rest of my life without ever having sex again," mused a lithe, stylish West Los Angeles mother of two who has been with her husband for 17 years. "Then when I have sex and get into it, it surprises me. I think oh, this is great." The woman said that she doesn't know why her interest in sex has diminished so dramatically.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1985 | LEE SIEGEL, Associated Press
As AIDS kills their friends and lovers, homosexual men are suffering increased anxiety, depression, isolation and sexual disorders, a New York therapist said. "People in their 20s, 30s and 40s are not used to being surrounded by so many people who are dying," Michael Shernoff, a psychiatric social worker, said at a sex research convention. "People are feeling under attack physically. You never know when you're going to die."
HEALTH
November 17, 2008 | Regina Nuzzo, Nuzzo is a freelance writer.
Far be it from us to pick nits with billionaire Warren Buffett in these bleak economic times, but perhaps he knows more about finance than he does about sex. "It's nice to have a lot of money, but you know, you don't want to keep it around forever," Buffett, worth $62 billion at age 78, told Bloomberg News recently. "Otherwise it's a little like saving sex for your old age." His compatriots might disagree.
HEALTH
November 17, 2008 | Regina Nuzzo, Nuzzo is a freelance writer.
Far be it from us to pick nits with billionaire Warren Buffett in these bleak economic times, but perhaps he knows more about finance than he does about sex. "It's nice to have a lot of money, but you know, you don't want to keep it around forever," Buffett, worth $62 billion at age 78, told Bloomberg News recently. "Otherwise it's a little like saving sex for your old age." His compatriots might disagree.
HEALTH
May 8, 2006 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
ELIZABETH Hartofelis had never used birth control pills, relying instead on a diaphragm and then on her husband Christopher's vasectomy to avoid pregnancy. But at age 43, when she started experiencing hot flashes and night sweats, typical symptoms of perimenopause, she began taking a low-dose oral contraceptive to stabilize her fluctuating hormones. A few months later, she lost all interest in sex. "I just felt like I was neutered," says the Westford, Conn., woman.
NEWS
September 16, 2002 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I have said that I could live the rest of my life without ever having sex again," mused a lithe, stylish West Los Angeles mother of two who has been with her husband for 17 years. "Then when I have sex and get into it, it surprises me. I think oh, this is great." The woman said that she doesn't know why her interest in sex has diminished so dramatically.
NEWS
February 19, 2001 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sure, you're tired; so is your mate. The two of you lie in bed next to each other: two islands enveloped in a cloud of fatigue. The garden-variety battles of putting children to bed, managing job stress, paying bills and squeezing in housework circle your head like a swarm of locusts. The very last thing either of you feels like doing is reaching over and starting something you'll have to finish. But sex, as unlikely as it seems, is the equivalent of the body's natural amphetamine.
HEALTH
May 1, 2000 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Denise's husband thought she was having an affair. The couple's love life had gone down the tubes--to the point, says 33-year-old Denise, that she didn't want to be touched and would even orchestrate a passion-damping fight with her husband if she sensed sex was in the cards that night. "It was a big, huge strain on my marriage," she says. Fifty-three-year-old Randee's love life was also troubled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1999
I do not think most of us in the psychoanalytic community would agree with Dr. Arnold I. Gilberg's opinion (letter, Feb. 22) that it is the labeling of difficulties in a person's sexual function that causes low self-esteem. Rather, it is the feelings of inadequacy and shame about the sexual difficulty which lead the person to conceal the problem, often with a sense of embarrassment and hopelessness. The recent response to the news about Viagra is evidence that there are many individuals hoping for such help but who have been reluctant to reveal their problem.
HEALTH
May 1, 2000 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Denise's husband thought she was having an affair. The couple's love life had gone down the tubes--to the point, says 33-year-old Denise, that she didn't want to be touched and would even orchestrate a passion-damping fight with her husband if she sensed sex was in the cards that night. "It was a big, huge strain on my marriage," she says. Fifty-three-year-old Randee's love life was also troubled.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | DANA KENNEDY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A new book by a low-key New Orleans sex therapist proclaims that the greatest sexual ecstasy comes not from a fling with a Cosmo cover girl, but with your spouse or current partner. In his book, "Constructing the Sexual Crucible" (W. W. Norton, $39.95), Dr. David Schnarch coined the term "wall-socket sex" to explain the electrifying sexual connection that can be reached by two people in a close, intimate relationship. Since AIDS, monogamy has suddenly become more desirable.
NEWS
February 16, 1999 | Sandy Banks
It was a fitting release for the week leading up to Valentine's Day . . . a report on sex that lent an air of desperation to all those folks in line at candy counters and Victoria's Secret. Simply put, black lace teddies and romantic candlelight dinners aside, American men and women are dreadful in the sex department. That's the finding of what's been hailed as "the most revealing snapshot of American sexual health" since the Kinsey Report 50 years ago.
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
More than 40% of women and 30% of men regularly have no interest in sex, can't have an orgasm or suffer from some other sexual problem, according to a new analysis of data in a comprehensive U.S. sex survey. The analysis, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., is based on extensive interviews with 1,749 women and 1,410 men done in 1992.
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