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Seymour Benzer

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NEWS
July 24, 1986
Three Caltech professors have received honors from national societies for scholarly work. John D. Roberts, a professor of chemistry at Caltech since 1952, has been awarded the 1987 Priestly Medal, the nation's highest honor in chemistry, from the American Chemical Society. Roberts is internationally recognized for pioneering in chemical reactivity and studying the structure of molecules. The presentation will take place in April at the society's annual meeting in Denver.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Seymour Benzer, the Caltech biologist who made key findings about the structure and function of genes and pioneered research linking genes to behavior, died from a stroke Friday at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena. He was 86. Many of his colleagues felt that he should have been awarded a Nobel Prize for his achievements in elucidating the nature of genes and their links to everyday activities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Seymour Benzer, the Caltech biologist who made key findings about the structure and function of genes and pioneered research linking genes to behavior, died from a stroke Friday at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena. He was 86. Many of his colleagues felt that he should have been awarded a Nobel Prize for his achievements in elucidating the nature of genes and their links to everyday activities.
BOOKS
July 25, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, Robert Lee Hotz is a science writer for The Times
Consider the new language of science drawn from the tidal word pools of creation: dissatisfaction, pirouette, timeless, ghost, glisten, gang-of-three, methuselah, bizarre and one most newly minted, bubblegum. Each of these is the name of a mutant gene linking biology and behavior in an infinitesimal way that poses profound questions of free will and the predestination of biological programming, of flesh and the spirit.
BOOKS
July 25, 1999 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, Robert Lee Hotz is a science writer for The Times
Consider the new language of science drawn from the tidal word pools of creation: dissatisfaction, pirouette, timeless, ghost, glisten, gang-of-three, methuselah, bizarre and one most newly minted, bubblegum. Each of these is the name of a mutant gene linking biology and behavior in an infinitesimal way that poses profound questions of free will and the predestination of biological programming, of flesh and the spirit.
NEWS
August 25, 1991
Seymour Benzer, James G. Boswell professor of neuroscience at Caltech, has received a $150,000 grant from the McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience in Minneapolis to support his research into the neurogenetics of degeneration in the drosophila (fruit fly) brain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1991
The Israel-based Wolf Foundation Monday awarded its $100,000 1991 prize for medicine to Seymour Benzer, a U.S. expert on the structure of genes. The foundation honored Benzer, a 69-year-old professor at Caltech in Pasadena, for "having generated a new field of molecular neurogenetics by his pioneering research on the dissection of the nervous system and behavior of gene mutations." The foundation was established by Ricardo Wolf in 1975 to "promote science and art for the benefit of mankind."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1999
Biology has traditionally parceled the human brain into two regions: the "new brain" or "neocortex," where reason and analysis reside, and the old or "lower" brain, which reacts to environmental events in a simple, stimulus-response fashion that guides the behavior of less-evolved animals. The basic idea is that our lower brain senses a stimulus--say a car horn or a doctor tapping our knee--and then responds reflexively, tensing our back or flexing our leg.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No, the baby chick wasn't quite right. Neither was the fish, nor the chameleon. Ah, the fruit fly. Now there's a fine specimen, thought Caltech Prof. Seymour Benzer, a neurobiologist of world renown. It was the mid-1960s, and Benzer was looking for an animal, an insect, something to help him understand how genes affect human behavior; to help him understand why his two daughters, born six years apart, behaved so darn differently.
NEWS
July 24, 1986
Three Caltech professors have received honors from national societies for scholarly work. John D. Roberts, a professor of chemistry at Caltech since 1952, has been awarded the 1987 Priestly Medal, the nation's highest honor in chemistry, from the American Chemical Society. Roberts is internationally recognized for pioneering in chemical reactivity and studying the structure of molecules. The presentation will take place in April at the society's annual meeting in Denver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II and Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writers
Edward B. Lewis, the Caltech Nobel laureate who was the first to explain how genes control the development of organs during the early growth of an embryo, died Wednesday at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena after a long battle with cancer. He was 86. Lewis' studies explained how an essentially shapeless fertilized egg develops into an organism with a front and back, head and feet, and right and left sides.
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